Sun – Compound Word Verse

Sun

Breaking the night in orange glow
Rising in the sky but still slow 
is sunlight

Streaking though the limbs of oak trees
Catching dust particles with ease
are sunbeams

Dancing on water’s gentle waves
Sparkling diamonds memory saves
as sun-kissed 

Tanning bodies on sandy shores
Skin soaking in lotion one pours
for sunburn 

As the day wears on it sinks low
Towards the west it now must go
to sunset


Copyright © 2021 Christine Bolton - Poetry for Healing
All Rights Reserved

Grace is hosting D'Verse Poets and she has prompted us with
Compound Word Verse.  

The Compound Word Verse is a poetry form invented by Margaret R. Smith that consists of five 3-line stanzas, for a total of 15 lines. The last line of each stanza ends in a compound word and these compound words share a common stem word which is taken from the title. (In the first example below the stem word is “moon” from the title “Moonlighting”; the compound words related to the title are moondust, moonbeams, moonsongs, etc.)

The Compound Word Verse (3 lines) has a set rhyme scheme and meter as follows:

Rhyme Scheme: a,a,b
Syllable/Meter: 8, 8, 3 

Image by sabri ismail from Pixabay 

Lost No More

Lost No More

Sun streaming through trees
piercing the forest floor with laser light
I follow the path of brightness
towards the beacon luring me

Unafraid of the unknown
I sense I am in familiar territory
Tall oaks, limbs stretched wide in welcome
pointing me in the direction to travel

Focused on the journey I pay no attention
to distractions pulling me away from my focus
I hear not the call of ghosts from my past
or feel the hands that pull on my clothes

The force propelling me forward
stronger than a million magnets
I am no longer lost
I am found


Copyright © 2021 Christine Bolton - Poetry for Healing
All Rights Reserved


Laura is hosting D'Verse Poets tonight and she has prompted
us with Lost and Found poetry.  We are to choose one of
the 'Lost" poems provided and respond to it with 'Found' poetry.

I chose to respond to Pablo Neruda's Lost In The Forest

“Lost in the forest, I broke off a dark twig
and lifted its whisper to my thirsty lips:
maybe it was the voice of the rain crying,
a cracked bell, or a torn heart.

Something from far off it seemed
deep and secret to me, hidden by the earth,
a shout muffled by huge autumns,
by the moist half-open darkness of the leaves.

Wakening from the dreaming forest there, the hazel-sprig
sang under my tongue, its drifting fragrance
climbed up through my conscious mind

as if suddenly the roots I had left behind
cried out to me, the land I had lost with my childhood—
and I stopped, wounded by the wandering scent.”

Image by jplenio from Pixabay 

Beginning to End – A Quadrille

Beginning to End

A face once smooth
Creamy as alabaster
now lined and sallow
The thick dark hair
highlighting burnt sienna
becomes thinning and white
Tight skin stretched onetime
over strong muscular limbs
Defying gravity
hanging in crepe folds
Soon the cycle will end
Ashes to ashes


Copyright © 2021 Christine Bolton - Poetry for Healing
All Rights Reserved


Sarah is hosting Monday Quadrille at D'Verse Poets
and has prompted us with the word 'Ash'

A Quadrille is a poem of exactly 44 words excluding the title

Image by Tomislav Jakupec from Pixabay 

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