Category: Blog

A Room with a View

A Room with a View

A circle of cackling crows
picnic on abandoned fruit
under the mango tree
Five female ducks
On the bank
Sitting pretty in a row
 
Wood Storks gather
in the shallows
surveying the territory 
As pink spoonbills 
splash land
in the water
 
Needle-beaked Ibis
waiting anxiously
for lawnmowers
to quiet their noise
so they may feast,
hungry for grubs
 
Late afternoon sun
captures Sandhill Cranes
In its glowing golden rays
Light reflecting
like dancing diamonds
on the surface of the lake
 
Full moon rising
Chasing day into night
Sky changing colors
Blues to pinks to greys
As it bids farewell
and darkness comes
 
 
 
Christine Bolton - Poetry for Healing ©

Grace at D'Verse Poets Pub has a special host
tonight, Peter Frankis, an Australian Writer who
has prompted us tonight to write a poem looking
out of a window. 

Image by Paul Brennan from Pixabay 
 

Sturgeon Moon – A Tanka

Sturgeon Moon

Full moon rising high
Reflecting light on water
Stirring dormant souls
Silhouettes of jumping fish
Visible in glow of dusk



Christine Bolton - Poetry for Healing © 

Written for Frank Tassone’s Weekly Haiki Challenge
#150.  This week we will see what’s known as the
Sturgeon Moon. Other names for this Full Moon
include ”Full Green Corn Moon,” signaling that
the corn was nearly ready for harvest,
”Wheat Cut Moon,” “Moon When All Things Ripen,”
and ”Blueberry Moon.”

Worn Away

Worn Away

Under the feet
of the greedy
resolve is slowly
worn away with time
The downtrodden
deplete of energy
Emotionless
Living with
reluctant acceptance
of what they find
impossible to change



Christine Bolton - Poetry for Healing © 

In response to Sue Vincent’s weekly write/photo

Song Lyric Sunday – The Times They Are A-Changin’

Jim Adams gave us some difficult prompts this week for Song Lyric Sunday – Acquire, Collect, Gather and Secure. Not sexy at all Jim!

This was the first and only song I thought of that had the word “Gather” in the lyrics. Bob Dylan’s ‘The Times They Are A-Changin'” from the 1960. The decade of protest and change. Sadly not much has changed in 50 plus years as we find ourselves fighting for the same civil rights today that we were then. It is certainly a song that will continue to resonate and inspire change.

I am interested to see what the others come up with today.

A call to action, “The Times They Are A-Changin'” became an anthem for frustrated youth. It summed up the anti-establishment feelings of people who would later be known as hippies. Many of the lyrics are based on the Civil Rights movement in the US.

In the liner notes of this album Biograph, Dylan wrote: “I wanted to write a big song, some kind of theme song, with short, concise verses that piled up on each other in a hypnotic way. This is definitely a song with a purpose. I knew exactly what I wanted to say and who I wanted to say it to.” 

Dylan recorded this song in October 1963. He first performed the song at a Carnegie Hall concert on October 26 that year, using it as his opening number.

On November 22, 1963, United States president John F. Kennedy was assassinated, which made this song even more poignant. This also presented a quandary for Dylan, who had to decide if he would keep playing the song; he found it odd when audiences would erupt in applause after hearing it, and wondered exactly what they were clapping for.

Dylan kept the song in his sets. It was issued on the album of the same name on January 13, 1964.

Dylan covered the Carter Family Song “Wayworn Traveler,” writing his own words to the melody and named it “Paths Of Victory”. This recording is featured on “Bootleg Series Vol. 1-3”. After writing that song, he re-wrote the words again, changed the time signature to 3/4, and created this, one of his most famous songs ever.

This was released as a single in the UK in 1965 before Dylan went there to tour. It became his first hit in that territory, climbing to #9 on April 21. British listeners liked what they heard from Dylan and made a run on his second album, The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan (released in 1963), sending it to #1 on April 11. This marked the first time in two years that an album by a group other that The Beatles or Rolling Stones was #1 in the UK.

Lyrics

Come gather 'round, people
Wherever you roam
And admit that the waters
Around you have grown
And accept it that soon
You'll be drenched to the bone
If your time to you is worth savin'
And you better start swimmin'
Or you'll sink like a stone
For the times they are a-changin'

Come writers and critics
Who prophesize with your pen
And keep your eyes wide
The chance won't come again
And don't speak too soon
For the wheel's still in spin
And there's no tellin' who
That it's namin'
For the loser now
Will be later to win
For the times they are a-changin'

Come senators, congressmen
Please heed the call
Don't stand in the doorway
Don't block up the hall
For he that gets hurt
Will be he who has stalled
The battle outside ragin'
Will soon shake your windows
And rattle your walls
For the times they are a-changin'

Come mothers and fathers
Throughout the land
And don't criticize
What you can't understand
Your sons and your daughters
Are beyond your command
Your old road is rapidly agin'
Please get out of the new one
If you can't lend your hand
For the times they are a-changin'

The line it is drawn
The curse it is cast
The slow one now
Will later be fast
As the present now
Will later be past
The order is rapidly fadin'
And the first one now
Will later be last
For the times they are a-changin'

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Bob Dylan

Source: LyricFind



Perfect Storm – Haiku Sequence

Perfect Storm

Charcoal clouds
begin to form on
blue canvas of sky
 
Moving quickly
across the expanse
Darkness hovering
 
Menacingly
Spawning thunder claps
Booming loudly
 
Lightning cracks
open the sky
on cue
 
Together
in perfect concert
they perform
 
Before bowing
in acceptance of
the rain’s applause
 
 
Christine Bolton - Poetry for Healing ©


Frank Tassone is hosting D'Verse Poets Pub
tonight and has prompted us with
a Haiku Sequence.
You can write your haiku using the
traditional 5-7-5 syllable count.
Alternatively, you can write haiku
that can be read aloud in a breath,
using a short-long-short format,
without a syllable count.

Image by FelixMittermeier from Pixabay 
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