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Hotter Than Hades

Hotter Than Hades

That summer when I was seven was hotter than Hades
The earth dry and cracked like a moon crater
I remember Grandma sitting on her porch
Snipping the green beans into her apron
Wiping the sweat from her eyes
with the damp cloth permanently wrapped around her neck
We spent most days down in the swimming hole
Swinging from the tree and jumping in the water
or floating in tire tubes just to stay cool
When the sun went down we'd catch fireflies in jars
and watch the June bugs spinning on their backs
by the kitchen door
The days passed slower than molasses
Daddy used to say it was hotter than a stolen tamale
I remember the swarm of grasshoppers that came
They were bigger than Texas.  Billy said they were locusts
They ate momma’s sunflowers,
making her madder than a hornet
There were so many in the air they would land on your legs
while you were riding your bike
Grown-ups were bad-tempered and us kids stayed well away
It seemed as if it was never going to rain
Until that day when big fat drops spotted the pavement 
Like the polka dots on my Sunday best dress
It was a Saturday
Finally, the heavens opened
and the rain came down in buckets
We danced in the street until we were soaked to the skin
and Grandma chased us in with her broom
The next day we all went to church to give thanks 
 
 
Copyright © 2021 Christine Bolton - Poetry for Healing
All Rights Reserved

Grace is hosting D'Verse Poets tonight and she has
prompted us to write a poem incorporating setting (specific or descriptive) in our blog.

Word Prompt

Swim - FOWC

Photo by Tengyart on Unsplash

One Liner Wednesday – Take Your Foot out of Your Mouth

Good morning! I know we have all had moments where we wish we could take back things we have said. Usually a clumsy comment that was never meant to offend, but it’s out, and you just want to shrivel up in horror. Have you ever noticed that some people are repeaters and they don’t seem to realize it? This reminded me of them,

For Linda G. Hill’s One Liner Wednesday

Mushroom Cloud

Mushroom Cloud

An early August morning
A day like any other
beginning for many
ending for thousands
Enola Gay released and
Little Boy was on his descent
Exploding above earth
at eight sixteen am
Burning, killing, obliterating
instantly
His mushroom cloud
rising back towards the sky
Quickly spreading outwards
Continuing his destruction
Warnings, given
Believed, perhaps
Doubted, likely
Heeded, not

 
Copyright © 2021 Christine Bolton - Poetry for Healing
All Rights Reserved

Sarah is hosting D'Verse Poets tonight and has
prompted us with "Mushroom" and encouraged us to
use it however we wish.

This poem is about the dropping of the
Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima, Japan on August 6, 1945

Photo courtesy of Live Science

Embracing Change – A Quadrille

Embracing Change

Unlike in our youth
change comes quickly now
Ability to choose
overridden by health
and age
Geography playing its part
as family concerns escalate
Learning to embrace
whatever comes
difficult but necessary
What goes around, 
comes around,
as moving forward
is the only option
 
 
Copyright © 2021 Christine Bolton - Poetry for Healing
All Rights Reserved

Merril is hosting Monday Quadrille at D'Verse Poets
and she has prompted us with the word "Embrace".
This is how I chose to use it.

A Quadrille is a poem of exactly 44 words excluding
the title.

Image by Kranich17 from Pixabay

Song Lyric Sunday – Black Velvet

Our host of Song Lyric Sunday, Jim Adams, has prompted us with ‘Colors’ this week. I found so many songs using colors in the title, let alone the lyrics, that it was hard to decide on which one to go with. I settled for one I am particularly fond of called “Black Velvet” by Alannah Myles. It’s fantastic song and I’m sure you’ll know it.

Have a great Sunday!

This song is about Elvis Presley. Some lyric analysis:

“Jimmie Rodgers on the Victrola up high” – Jimmie Rodgers, a country music pioneer from Elvis’ home state of Mississippi, influencing Elvis (the baby) at an early age. The Victrola is the record player, played loudly.

“Mama’s dancin’ with baby on her shoulder” – Gladys Presley dancing with the infant Elvis.

“Black velvet and that little boy’s smile” – You can buy a black velvet Elvis painting at any respectable yard sale. Early female fans were drawn to his “Little boy smile.”

“Black velvet with that slow southern style” – Elvis delivered some of his songs with slow, undulating hips. Check out “Steamroller Blues” live.

“Up in Memphis the music’s like a heatwave” – Sun Studios. The epicenter of early rock music and where Elvis recorded.

“White lightning, bound to drive you wild” – rock music and booze.

“Mama’s baby’s in the heart of every school girl” – A reference to the baby in the early part of the song, being loved by all the young girls.

“Love Me Tender leaves ’em cryin’ in the aisle” – Love Me Tender was a huge hit for Elvis in 1956.

“The way he moved, it was a sin, so sweet and true” – Elvis’ legendary hips swivel, the Pelvis.

“Every word of every song that he sang was for you. In a flash he was gone, it happened so soon, what could you do?” – Elvis died suddenly in 1977.

This was a Canadian production: The song was written by the Canadian musicians David Tyson and Christopher Ward, and Myles is from Toronto. Ward and Myles were a couple and also worked together – she sang on his 1981 solo album Time Stands Still. Teaming up with Tyson, Ward put together a demo tape for Myles which got her a deal with Atlantic Records. 

Produced by Tyson and Ward, Alannah Myles was her first album, and it was a huge hit in Canada, becoming the top-selling debut album in Canadian history. “Black Velvet” was the first US single, and it was a massive hit, rising to #1 in March 1990, where it stayed for two weeks. The US follow-up single was another song written by Tyson and Ward, “Love Is.” That song went to #36 and was her last chart entry in America. She did have several more hits in Canada.

Christopher Ward got the idea for this song when he was a VJ for the Canadian music channel MuchMusic. He was sent to Memphis to cover the 10th anniversary of Elvis’ death (August 16, 1987), which exposed him to many fervent Elvis fans. Inspired by their passion for the rocker, he took notes while he was working on the special (which was called Mecca in Memphis), writing lyrics based on what Elvis meant to his fans and what it must have been like for him growing up in the South.

Myles won a Grammy award for Best Female Rock Performance for this song, along with several Juno Awards. Additionally, this won a Diamond award for sales in excess of 1,000,000 in Canada, the only time an artist has won this for her debut record. ASCAP awarded the song a ‘Millionaire Award’ in 2005 for over 4 million radio plays in the USA.

According to the song’s writer Christopher Ward, a key line in this song is “A new religion that will bring you to your knees.” He says he got the idea for that line after realizing that Elvis’ affect on fans was similar to what churchgoers would feel after being exhorted by fundamentalist preachers.

Courtesy of Songfacts

Lyrics

Mississippi in the middle of a dry spell
Jimmie Rodgers on the Victrola up high
Mama's dancin' with baby on her shoulder
The sun is settin' like molasses in the sky
The boy could sing, knew how to move ev'rything
Always wanting more, he'd leave you longing for
Black velvet and that little boy smile
Black velvet with that slow southern style
A new religion that'll bring you to your knees
Black velvet if you please

Up in Memphis the music's like a heat wave
White Lightnin' bound to drive you wild
Mama's baby's in the heart of ev'ry school girl
"Love Me Tender" leaves 'em cryin' in the aisle
The way he moved, it was a sin, so sweet and true
Always wanting more, he'd leave you longing for

Black velvet and that little boy smile
Black velvet and that slow southern style
A new religion that'll bring you to your knees
Black velvet if you please

Ev'ry word of ev'ry song that he sang was for you
In a flash he was gone, it happened so soon
What could you do?

Black velvet and that little boy smile
Black velvet in that slow southern style
A new religion that'll bring you to your knees
Black velvet if you please

Black velvet and that little boy smile
Black velvet in that slow southern style
A new religion that'll bring you to your knees
Black velvet if you please

If you please
If you please
If you please

Writer/s: Christopher Ward, David Tyson 
Publisher: Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd., OLE MEDIA MANAGEMENT LP
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind
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