Category: Flash Fiction

Flower Child – Flash Fiction

Flower Child

Every Sunday without fail, mother and I would walk to the station and catch the morning train to the coast to see my grandmother.   

Mother would tend to grandmother’s garden, caring for roses, mowing grass and trimming bushes. I amused myself as best I could for an eight-year old but mostly I learned about flowers.  Names like Peony, Hollyhock, and Delphinium. The term “bedding plants” made the child I was, giggle.  But pretty blue Lobelia was prefect next to the white Alyssum.

Exhausted we’d return in the early evening with armfuls of her beautiful blooms.   

I did not always want to go.  I know now my mother was escaping from her unhappy life and needed the diversion.  She is no longer here and I think I’d like, too, to plant the sweet alyssum that smells like honey and peace reminding me always of her.

Copyright © 2022 Christine Bolton - Poetry for Healing
All Rights Reserved

Sanaa aka adashofsunny is hosting Prosery Monday at D'Verse.
She has prompted us with this line from a poem that is to be included
in our piece of flash fiction exactly as it is.  

"I’d like, too, to plant the sweet alyssum that smells like honey and peace.”  from the poem, “What I would like to grow in my Garden.” by Katherine Riegel.

The piece of flash fiction is to have no more than 144 words' 

Happy as a Lark – Flash Fiction

Happy as a Lark

Time of no consequence on this summer afternoon.  Reclining comfortably on the cool grass, my back against the shady oak.  Around me gossamer wings of dragonflies work overtime returning my incredulous stare.

Birdsong fills the air as buttercups wave in the breeze.  My mind wanders wherever it wishes and I remember childhood family walks through these fields.  Being the youngest I’d sit atop my father’s shoulders. My siblings carrying the makings of a picnic our mother would set on a tartan blanket.  After, we would play hide and seek and make daisy chains to wear.  Happy as larks we would run until exhausted and collapse in a heap under a tree.

Through the deep caves of thought I hear a voice that sings.  Unrecognizable at first but then as I stir it becomes clearer.  The beautiful sound of a summer lark completing my reverie.

Copyright © 2022 Christine Bolton - Poetry for Healing
All Rights Reserved

Lisa is hosting Prosery Monday at D'Verse Poets tonight.  The line we are to use in our piece of Flash Fiction or Non Fiction is by Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr., from The Chambered Nautilus "Through the deep caves of thought I hear a voice that sings"
Prosery is exactly 144 words excluding the title.  It cannot be poetry.

Crooked Smile – Flash Fiction

Crooked Smile

She had known pain.  Living with her like a constant companion.  Sometimes nudging, often poking.  Always reminding her of its presence.

The hurt ever-present. Over time festering in her heart, she would lance it like a boil.  Easing out the poison stopping it traveling to her very soul.  Concentrating on this familiar task helped her through another day.

The pain reminded her she was alive. Without it, dead.  To the observer, she was a hamster on a wheel continuously moving, going nowhere, caught in a vicious cycle.  That is how I remembered her.

Now returning to that place I see her vacant look gone.  Replaced with shining eyes I’d never noticed before. Knowing instinctively what happened to the pain she carried.  She’d had it sliced away, leaving a scar, and she wore it proudly on her face in the form of a crooked smile.

Copyright © 2022 Christine Bolton - Poetry for Healing
All Rights Reserved

Prosery Monday at D'Verse is hosted tonight by Sarah from SarahSouthwest.  She
has given us a line from a poem by Michael Donaghy.
"She’d had it sliced away, leaving a scar"
We are to use it in exact order in our piece of fiction of exactly 144 words.

Because They Can – Flash Non-Fiction

Evil lives in all of us, of that I am certain.  The good have filters, able to sift through madness knowing instinctively right from wrong. The bad have none.  They wear their hatred openly in the guns they carry.  They know their rights and that’s enough for them.  To hell with ‘bleeding heart liberals’ who want to take them away.  How dare they!  

Who teaches this hatred?  What atrocities can bring someone to this place of evil?  What would this person have done if the gun laws were different?  Stabbed people one by one in a grocery store before being stopped after the second victim? Poisoned the lemonade served to children in school? No, of course not.  These are the things they don’t tell us.  Why would they when their country allows purchase of assault rifles to murder innocents in a more expedient manner? 😡

Copyright © 2022 Christine Bolton - Poetry for Healing
All Rights Reserved

The 144 word limit for Prosery Monday was not enough to release the anger inside me for the ugliness I witness at an alarming rate in this country.  It is as if we are at war with mankind.  Such hatred for the innocents whether children or minorities. 

Lisa from Tao Talk is our host tonight for Prosery Monday at D'Verse Poets and she shared a very moving poem she found on Facebook about the slaughter of those young children in Uvalde, Texas.  She picked one line from the poem and asked us to use it in our prosery tonight. 

“These are the things they don’t tell us”
by Girl Du Jour, from Notes on Uvalde

Blind Faith – Flash Fiction

Blind Faith

The church clock struck again. We’d waited more than an hour.

“Why’s this taking so long?”, said Ma wearily .

“It’s ok”, I replied, knowing the question was rhetorical.

Ma was still guilty about the explosion that left me blind since I was five.  It was May Day and the village was celebrating.  Da left his cigarette burning while he stepped outside to watch.  Pretending I was a grown up, puffing on it, I choked so hard I dropped it near the gas stove.  I don’t remember much else until I woke in the hospital.

Since then Ma has taken me to every faith healer that she could find.  

Each time I say “For how can I be sure I shall see again?”

“The world on the first of May will be brighter that day because you’ll be able to see it.” she replies.

Copyright © 2022 Christine Bolton - Poetry for Healing
All Rights Reserved

Merril is hosting Prosery Monday at D’Verse And has prompted us with this line:  
“For how can I be sure
I shall see again
The world on the first of May” --From “May Day” by Sara Teasdale
Prosery Flash Fiction of exactly 144 words and must include the complete line from the poem.  It may be punctuated but no words can be inserted within the given line.

Walk It Off – Flash Fiction

woman walking near closed doors of building near water with self reflection
Photo by Mitch Kesler on Pexels.com

Walk It Off

With anxiety at a high level I’m pacing the room unable to calm down.  Everything was fine until the call from James.  Why did I answer?  He aggravated me more than usual.

I have to get out of here and walk before I blow a gasket.

I’m halfway down the street before realizing I had no coat.  Shivering, I wandered.  Lonely as a cloud nine, because they are few and far between, well at least to me.  I really can’t remember the last time I was happy with James.  He is probably the most high maintenance man I have ever known.  I feel like I am constantly babying him. Ugh!

The night time streets are empty and I am grateful for the solitude.  I’ll walk until I can cool off and then head home with a clearer head.

James is in the rear-view mirror.

Copyright © 2022 Christine Bolton - Poetry for Healing
All Rights Reserved

Lillian is hosting Prosery Monday at D'Verse and has prompted us with
the famous line "I wandered lonely as a cloud" from William Wordsworth's 
famous poem.  We are to use the line in its entirety with words in that order, although they may be punctuated. Prosery is a piece of flash fiction no more than 144 words excluding the title.

Blessings In Disguise – Flash Fiction

Blessings In Disguise

They sat on the stairs waiting, shoulders touching. Listening to him intently, and loving the warmth of his body next to hers.  It was serendipitous she’d locked herself out of the apartment as he was coming home from work.  She smiled, remembering.

“You ok?” He had said as he stood outside his door watching her struggle with her door.

“Yes, fine” she had responded, not wanting him to see how frustrated she was.

“You’re locked out, aren’t you?” He said with a smile on his face. “I’ll call a locksmith for you.”

“Not necessary” she said.  Embarrassed at her own incompetence.  This was not how it was supposed to be.  She’d had a much better idea in her head how it would be when they finally met.

But she thought, “It is a moon wrapped up in brown paper.”  Sometimes blessings come in disguise.

Copyright © 2022 Christine Bolton - Poetry for Healing
All Rights Reserved


Bjorn is hosting Prosery Monday at D'Verse and his prompt is a line from the poem
Valentine by Carol Ann Duffy - “It is a moon wrapped up in brown paper.”  We are to
use it in our piece of Prosery (flash fiction).  No more than 144 words excluding
the title.

Bookworm – Flash Fiction

Bookworm

She looked over the top of her glasses, perched on the end of her nose.  There he was standing in front of French Literature.  Her heart skipped remembering the last time he had stopped by the desk for assistance.

Sighing, she turned her attention back to cataloging the pile of books that were in front of her.   Busying herself she hadn’t noticed he’d moved across the library floor and was now standing in front of her.

“You look as if you need a break.” he said in a bright, cheerful manner.

Startled she dropped the book she was holding. 

“Excuse me?” she said looking up smiling as she realized it was him

“Would you like to have lunch with me?”  he asked.

“Yes!” she answered, maybe too quickly.

“Great!“  he said.  “Oh, and bring no book, for this one day we’ll give to idleness.”.

Copyright © 2022 Christine Bolton - Poetry for Healing
All Rights Reserved

Ingrid is hosting Monday Prosery at D’Verse Poets and has prompted us with the line: “And bring no book, for this one day we’ll give to idleness.” from from Wordsworth’s ‘Lines Written at a small distance from my House…‘ We are to use the line in our piece of Flash Fiction (Prosery). The rule is that Prosery should be no more than 144 words, excluding the title.

What Goes Around Comes Around – Flash Fiction

What Goes Around Comes Around

As a child she remembered climbing on the rubble of what was once terraced houses.  Sometimes discovering staircases standing alone, still intact but minus the bannister 

A treasure trove of others belongings could still be found in the heap of bricks.  Books, sometimes photos with singed edges, a toy, or a tin of buttons.  

Looking back, understanding a child’s innocence of the horrors that had barely preceded her, she wondered “What are the roots that clutch, what branches grow out of this stony rubbish?”.  A debris of once loved abodes full of life becoming a playground wonderland.  

Then rising from the ashes to become concrete and glass, a new way of living for many in incomprehensible heights above a broken city bombed from recognition.

She stared up at a tower block born from that wreckage now decaying from neglect. What goes around, comes around.

Copyright © 2021 Christine Bolton - Poetry for Healing
All Rights Reserved

Mish is hosting Prosery Monday at D'Verse Poets where we write a piece of flash fiction no longer than 144 words. She has prompted us to include the following quote
from the T.S. Eliot poem The Wasteland.
“What are the roots that clutch, what branches growout of this stony rubbish?”

Keep on Running – Flash Fiction

Keep on Running

Time had passed since Abigail heard the voices so maybe the coast was clear. 

They had been muffled at first until the footsteps got closer, and then she could clearly hear the familiar, distinct southern drawl.  Two men conversing, unaware of her presence as she lay silent and motionless in the undergrowth, not daring to breathe.  She recognized the plantation foreman, Ned, immediately.

“As I said Caleb it ain’t gonna make an ounce of diff’rence.  You can lock ‘em up at nightfall but if they want it bad enough, they’ll as sure as hell try and make a run for it” 

“So if all do their duty, they need not fear harm?” Responded the younger man.  

“Exactly” said Ned, “They just need direction” his voice trailing off as they moved away.

Abigail shuddered, remembering the whipping she had received the last time she escaped.

Copyright © 2021 Christine Bolton - Poetry for Healing
All Rights Reserved

Ingrid is hosting Prosery Monday At D'Verse Poets tonight and has asked
us to write a piece of Flash Fiction (Prosery) using no more than 144 words
excluding the title.  We are to use this line from William Blake's poem,
The Chimney Sweeper.
"So if all do their duty, they need not fear harm"
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