Category: Song Lyric Sunday

Song Lyric Sunday – Something To Talk About

The prompts for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday, hosted by Jim Adams, are Chat, Laugh, Rant, Scream and Talk. I have picked the great song “Something To Talk About” by Bonnie Raitt. I hope you enjoy it and have a good Sunday.

This song is about small-town gossip and the effect it has on the singer and the guy she’s secretly in love with. It turns out that they’re rumored to be having an affair, and since the rumor-spreaders already think that the two people are involved, the song asks, why not have an affair anyway, thus giving them “something to talk about.”

This was written by the Canadian singer Shirley Eikhard, who had recorded in the Jazz and Country genres, but has had her most success as a songwriter, with songs recorded by Chet Atkins, Cher, Anne Murray and Rita Coolidge.

This won a Grammy Award for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance, beating out Oleta Adams, Mariah Carey, Amy Grant and Whitney Houston. The song was also nominated for Record of the Year, but lost to “Unforgettable.”

According to Anne Murray’s 2009 book All of Me, Anne wanted to record this song in 1986, but her producers didn’t think it would be a hit. She called her 1986 album “Something to Talk About” even though it did not include this song. Anne said she was happy that Bonnie Raitt made it a big hit five years later. 

For Raitt, this was by far her biggest chart hit in the United States.

This is a very popular Karaoke song, and is often performed by American Idol contestants. Season 3 winner Fantasia Barrino performed the song on the show, as did Idol notables Kellie Pickler and Sanjaya Malakar.

This lent its name to the 1995 comedy Something To Talk About, starring Julia Roberts as a jilted wife who faces judgment from her conservative town when her husband’s affair goes public. The version in the movie is sung by Therese Willis.

Courtesy of Songfacts

Something To Talk About 
Lyrics

People are talkin', talkin' 'bout people
I hear them whisper, you won't believe it
They think we're lovers kept under covers
I just ignore it, but they keep saying
We laugh just a little too loud
We stand just a little too close
We stare just a little too long
Maybe they're seeing something we don't, darlin'

Let's give them something to talk about
Let's give them something to talk about
Let's give them something to talk about
How about love?

I feel so foolish, I never noticed
You'd act so nervous
Could you be falling for me?
It took a rumor to make me wonder
Now I'm convinced I'm going under
Thinking 'bout you every day
Dreaming 'bout you every night
Hoping that you feel the same way
Now that we know it, let's really show it, darlin'

Let's give them something to talk about
A little mystery to figure out
Let's give them something to talk about
How about love, love, love, love?

Let's give them something to talk about, baby
A little mystery to figure out
Let's give them something to talk about
How about love, love, love, love?

(Something to talk about)
(Something to talk about)
How about love, love, love, love?

How about love, love, love, love?

Writer/s: SHIRLEY EIKHARD 
Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC,
SHIRLEY EIKHARD USA MUSIC
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – Dust In The Wind and Just The Way You Are

Good morning! Jim Adams has given us the prompts of “D and J” for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday, asking us to choose a song beginning with the letter “D” and/or “J”. I picked “Dust in Wind” by Kansas and “Just The Way You Are” by Billy Joel. Two gentle songs that I always enjoy whenever I hear them.

Kansas guitarist Kerry Livgren wrote this after reading a book of Native American poetry. The line that caught his attention was, “For all we are is dust in the wind.”

This got him thinking about the true value of material things and the meaning of success. The band was doing well and making money, but Kerry realized that in the end, he would eventually die just like everyone else. No matter our possessions or accomplishments, we all end up back in the ground.

Kerry Livgren wrote this song when he was under pressure to write a follow-up to the group’s hit, “Carry On Wayward Son.” While playing his acoustic guitar exercises, his wife suggested that putting lyrics to the patterns would yield his hit song. “I didn’t think it was a Kansas-type song,” he told Bruce Pollock. “She said, ‘Give it a try anyway.’ Several million records later, I guess she was right.”

Kansas was almost done writing and rehearsing the Point of Know Return album when their producer, Jeff Glixman, asked if they had any more songs. Livgren reluctantly played this song for his bandmates on acoustic guitar, insisting they wouldn’t like it because it was notKansas. To his surprise, they loved the song and insisted they record it. Livgren then fought against his own song, but was overruled. “Dust In The Wind” became their biggest hit, but Livgren never did think very highly of it. “I tend to like the more bombastic things, like ‘The Wall,’ he said in his interview with Pollock.

This slow, acoustic song was not typical of Kansas, whose previous singles included “Carry On My Wayward Son” and “Point Of Know Return.” It put the band in the position of having their best-known song be one that doesn’t reflect their sound

The phrase “dust in the wind” shows up in the Bible:
You are dust, and to dust you shall return
Genesis, 3:17-19

Kerry Livgren became an evangelical Christian in 1980. He says of his songwriting in the ’70s, “I was only expressing my own searching for something,” adding, “If you look at my lyrics, even ‘Dust in the Wind’ is a song about the transitory nature of our physical lives. That falls under the umbrella heading of God.”

This was the second big hit for Kansas, following “Carry On My Wayward Son.” With two hits under their belt, they were able to headline arena rock shows into the late ’70s. Later hits for the band include “Play the Game Tonight” (1982, #17 US) and “All I Wanted” (1986, #19 US).

In the movie Bill And Ted’s Excellent Adventure, Bill and Ted go back in time and share philosophy with Socrates, who is impressed when Ted, played by Keanu Reeves philosophizes “All we are is dust in the wind.”
This was the first acoustic Kansas song, and perhaps the most famous acoustic rock song ever recorded. It crossed over to a variety of formats, as Rock, Country, and Adult Contemporary radio statins all played it.

Courtesy of Songfacts

Lyrics
Dust in the Wind

I close my eyes, only for a moment,
and the moment's gone
All my dreams pass before my eyes,
a curiosity
Dust in the wind
All they are is dust in the wind

Same old song, just a drop of water
in an endless sea
All we do crumbles to the ground though
we refuse to see
Dust in the wind
All we are is dust in the wind
Oh, ho, ho

Now, don't hang on, nothing lasts forever
but the earth and sky
It slips away
And all your money won't another minute buy
Dust in the wind
All we are is dust in the wind
All we are is dust in the wind
Dust in the wind
Everything is dust in the wind
Everything is dust in the wind

The wind

Writer/s: Kerry Livgren 
Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

My second pick is “Just The Way You Are” – Billy Joel

Joel wrote this song about his first wife, Elizabeth. A pure expression of unconditional love, he gave it to her as a birthday present.Sadly, after nine years of marriage, Joel and Elizabeth divorced in 1982. Joel’s next two marriages didn’t work out either: he was married to Christie Brinkley from 1985-1994, and to Katie Lee from 2004-2010.

“Every time I wrote a song for a person I was in a relationship with, it didn’t last,” Joel said. “It was kind of like the curse. Here’s your song – we might as well say goodbye now.”

This won Grammy Awards for Song of the Year and Record of the Year at the 1979 ceremony. It was a breakthrough for Joel, whose biggest hit to this point was “Piano Man,” which reached #25 in the US.

Joel told USA Today July 9, 2008: “I was absolutely surprised it won a Grammy. It wasn’t even rock ‘n’ roll, it was like a standard with a little bit of R&B in it. It reminded me of an old Stevie Wonder recording.” >>

After Joel recorded this, he didn’t think much of it, considering it a “gloppy ballad” that would only get played at weddings. He credits his producer, Phil Ramone, with convincing him that it was a great song. Ramone brought Linda Ronstadt and Phoebe Snow into the recording studio to hear the song, and of course they loved it, which was good enough for Billy. On Australian TV in 2006, Joel confirmed: “We almost didn’t put it on an album. We were sitting around listening to it going naaah, that’s a chick song.”

Joel’s longtime drummer Liberty DeVitto considers his work on this track his greatest contribution to a Billy Joel song. In his Songfacts interview, DeVitto said: “Me and [producer] Phil Ramone came up with that kind of crazy rhythm that started out as a samba beat, like a bossa nova with a brush and a stick.”

Barry White’s cover version hit #12 in the UK in 1978. The song was also covered by Frank Sinatra and Isaac Hayes, whose version is in 6/8 time with a long introductory rap.

Joel was particularly amused by the Sinatra cover. “When we have a soundcheck we always send up my own material and we do ‘Just The Way You Are’ with this cheesy Las Vegas swing and make a whole joke of the thing and Sinatra did it exactly the same way,” he told Q in 1987. “I screamed when I heard it! You sure this isn’t me singing this, Frankie, or is it a joke or whaaat?”

Joel played a Fender Rhodes electric piano on this track, using the instrument’s phase shifter effect. This same setup can be heard on the Paul Simon song “Still Crazy After All These Years.”
This was the first single off The Stranger, which was Billy Joel’s sixth album

.On a July 16, 2006 blog for the Australian newspaper The Herald Sun, Joel said that he dreamt the melody and chord progression and wrote the lyrics over a few days after the dream recurred. He added that the drum pattern was suggested by his producer at the time, Phil Ramone.
Joel expanded to USA Today: “I dreamt the melody, not the words. I remember waking up in the middle of the night and going, ‘This is a great idea for a song.’ A couple of weeks later, I’m in a business meeting, and the dream reoccurs to me right at that moment because my mind had drifted off from hearing numbers and legal jargon. And I said, ‘I have to go!’ I got home and I ended up writing it all in one sitting, pretty much. It took me maybe two or three hours to write the lyrics.”

This was Joel’s first chart entry in the UK.

In his 2014 appearance on a Howard Stern town hall special, Joel explained that the original sheet music printed for this song was wrong, with an extra chord in the intro. He says that he often hears people playing it the wrong way, and has even corrected some of them when he hears it.

Joel played this on a 1988 episode of Sesame Street where he appeared with the deaf actress Marlee Matlin. They pay a visit to Oscar the Grouch, where Joel sings an altered version of the song to the trash-can dweller while Marlin signs the lyrics. Joel makes it clear that Oscar is fine the way he is, as he sings:

Don’t go changing just to please me

Cause being friendly’s not your style
Don’t want to hear you saying “thank you”
I would hate to see you smile
Just be grouchy
Really grouchy
You’ve done it pretty well so far

Paul McCartney delivered high praise for this song, stating in his Club Sandwich newsletter that it’s one of the few songs he wished he had written (“Stardust” was his first selection).

Joel performed this on Saturday Night Live in 1977, three months before it was released.

Courtesy of Songfacts

Lyrics
Just The Way You Are 

Don't go changing, to try and please me
You never let me down before
Don't imagine, you're too familiar
And I don't see you anymore
I wouldn't leave you in times of trouble
We never could have come this far
I took the good times, I'll take the bad times
I'll take you just the way you are

Don't go trying some new fashion
Don't change the color of your hair
You always have my unspoken passion
Although I might not seem to care

I don't want clever conversation
I never want to work that hard
I just want someone that I can talk to
I want you just the way you are

I need to know that you will always be
The same old someone that I knew
What will it take till you believe in me
The way that I believe in you

I said I love you and that's forever
And this I promise from the heart
I could not love you any better
I love you just the way you are

Writer/s: Billy Joel 
Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC,
Universal Music Publishing Group,
Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd.,
BMG Rights Management
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind



Song Lyric Sunday – M & A

Another great challenge this week for Song Lyric Sunday. Jim Adams has asked us to find songs beginning with the letter M and/or the letter A. Just like last week we are spoilt for choice and I’m looking forward to hearing songs from all genres today. My choices are ‘Mandolin Rain’ from Bruce Hornsby and the Range and ‘And I Love Her’ from the Beatles. Two beautiful songs that I hope you enjoy.

Bruce Randall Hornsby (born November 23, 1954) is an American singer-songwriter and pianist. He draws from classical, jazz, bluegrass, folk, Motown, gospel, rock, blues, and jam band musical traditions.

His recordings have been recognized with industry awards, including the 1987 Grammy Award for Best New Artist with Bruce Hornsby and the Range, the 1990 Grammy Award for Best Bluegrass Album, and the 1994 Grammy Award for Best Pop Instrumental Performance.

Hornsby has worked with his touring band Bruce Hornsby and the Noisemakers, his bluegrass project with Ricky Skaggs, and as a session and guest musician. He was a touring member of the Grateful Dead from September 1990 to March 1992, playing over 100 shows during that period.

In 1984, he formed Bruce Hornsby and the Range, who were signed to RCA Records in 1985. Besides Hornsby, Range members were David Mansfield (guitar, mandolin, violin), George Marinelli (guitars and backing vocals), former Ambrosia member Joe Puerta (bass guitar and backing vocals), and John Molo (drums).

Hornsby’s recording career started with the biggest hit he has had to date, “The Way It Is”. It topped the American music charts in 1986.[11] The song described aspects of homelessness, the American civil rights movement and institutional racism. It has since been sampled by at least six rap artists, including Tupac Shakur, E-40, and Mase.

With the success of the single, the album The Way It Is went multi-platinum and produced another top five hit with “Mandolin Rain” (co-written, as many of Hornsby’s early songs were, with his brother John). “Every Little Kiss” also did respectably well. Other tracks on the album helped establish what some labeled the “Virginia sound”, a mixture of rock, jazz, and bluegrass. Bruce Hornsby and the Range went on to win the Grammy Award for Best New Artist in 1987, beating out Glass Tiger, Nu Shooz, Simply Red, and Timbuk3.

Courtesy of Wiki

Lyrics - Mandolin Rain

The song came and went
Like the times that we spent
Hiding out from the rain under the carnival tent
I laughed and she'd smile
It would last for awhile
You don't know what you got till you lose it all again

Listen to the mandolin rain
Listen to the music on the lake
Listen to my heart break every time she runs away
Listen to the banjo wind
A sad song drifting low
Listen to the tears roll
Down my face as she turns to go

A cool evening dance
Listening to the bluegrass band takes the chill
From the air 'til they play the last song
I'll do my time
Keeping you off my mind but there's moments
That I find, I'm not feeling so strong

Listen to the mandolin rain
Listen to the music on the lake
Listen to my heart break every time she runs away
Listen to the banjo wind
A sad song drifting low
Listen to the tears roll
Down my face as she turns to go

Running down by the lake shore
She did love the sound of a summer storm
It played on the lake like a mandolin
Now it's washing her away again

Listen to the mandolin rain
Listen to the music on the lake
Listen to my heart break every time she runs away
Listen to the banjo wind
A sad song drifting low
Listen to the tears roll
Down my face as she turns to go

The boat's steaming in
I watch the side wheel spin and I
Think about her when I hear that whistle blow
I can't change my mind
I knew all the time that she'd go
But that's a choice I made long ago

Listen to the mandolin rain
Listen to the music on the lake
Listen to my heart break every time she runs away
Listen to the banjo wind
A sad song drifting low
Listen to the tears roll
Down my face as she turns to go

Writer/s: Bruce Hornsby, John Hornsby 
Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, 
Warner Chappell Music, Inc.
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

For the letter A I have chosen one of the prettiest Beatles songs, “And I Love Her”. Paul McCartney’s beautiful voice is just perfect..

Paul McCartney wrote most of this song. In a 1984 interview with Playboy magazine, he stated, “It’s just a love song; no, it wasn’t for anyone.” That was probably the chivalrous thing to do, as by then he was 15 years into his marriage to Linda. When he wrote the song, he was dating an actress named Jane Asher. For a while, they were the most popular couple in England. After they broke up in 1968, McCartney married Linda Eastman and Asher became a proficient author. She later started her own business called “Jane Asher Party Cakes.”

McCartney did write “We Can Work It Out” and “Here, There And Everywhere” about Asher.

This was one of the first pop songs with a title that starts in mid-sentence. Paul was inspired by songs such as Perry Como’s “And I Love Her So.”

Most of the songs on the album A Hard Days Night are John Lennon compositions. Lennon helped out with the middle part of this song, but it’s mostly the work of McCartney. Structurally, the song is fairly conventional, with a clear melody in A+A+B+A system similar to popular music from the ’30s that Irving Berlin wrote.

Paul McCartney was the only Beatle to sing on this. Like “Yesterday,” it is one of just a few Beatle songs with only one vocalist.
George Harrison came up with the acoustic guitar intro that made the song instantly recognizable. “I think that song wouldn’t be anything without that,” McCartney told GQ in 2018. “He just made up that riff, and you think about that song without that riff, it wouldn’t be half as good.”

This is one of the most-covered Beatles songs, with well over 300 recorded versions Their most-covered track is “Yesterday.”
McCartney always intended this to be a ballad. He felt that all of their albums, regardless of how “rocky” they were, should have at least one ballad “to enrich the show.” It’s the reason he added “Till There Was You” to With The Beatles. The Beatles Anthology 1 album has a much faster version that includes both drums and George’s 12-string electric guitar, but that wasn’t the original intent.

The Beatles recorded this song at the end of February 1964, in the week after returning from the United States and before the start of filming their movie A Hard Day’s Night, where they perform the song. The take you hear on record is Take 21.

Ringo played the bongos on this track; George Harrison played the acoustic guitar solo.

The guitar duo Santo & Johnny recorded a mellow surf instrumental version of this song in 1965 which was a huge hit in Mexico. Santo & Johnny are known for their #1 hit “Sleep Walk.”

Despite the fact that he wrote 35% of this song (the middle eight), John Lennon called this “Paul’s first ‘Yesterday.'”

This was the first Beatles recording using purely acoustic instruments.
Paul once stated “This was the first song that I impressed myself with.”
When Paul McCartney was asked during a 2014 Twitter Q&A what he considers to be his favorite cover of one of his tracks, the former Beatle replied: “There are so many that I love it’s difficult to say, but Esther Phillips’ version of ‘And I love HIM’ comes to mind.”

Courtesy of Songfacts

I give her all my love
That’s all I do
And if you saw my love
You’d love her, too
I love her

She gives my everything
And tenderly
The kiss my lover brings
She brings to me
And I love her

A love like ours
Could never die
As long as I
Have you near me

Bright are the stars that shine
Dark is the sky
I know this love of mine
Will never die
And I love her

Bright are the stars that shine
Dark is the sky
I know this love of mine
Will never die
And I love her

Writer/s: John Lennon, Paul McCartney 
Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC,

Tratore, Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd.
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – Paint it Black, Gloria!

Happy New Year everyone! This week Jim Adams has prompted us with PG for Song Lyric Sunday. Not PG rated, but a song that starts with the letter “P” or “G”. I missed last Sunday’s Challenge because of the holidays so I have chosen two songs today. I have had both in my mind for a while and was just waiting for the right prompt, and here it is! Two of my all time favorites. “Paint it Black” by the Rolling Stones and “Gloria” by Van Morrison (THEM). I hope you enjoy them.

This is written from the viewpoint of a person who is depressed; he wants everything to turn black to match his mood. There was no specific inspiration for the lyrics. When asked at the time why he wrote a song about death, Mick Jagger replied: “I don’t know. It’s been done before. It’s not an original thought by any means. It all depends on how you do it.”
The song seems to be about a lover who died:

“I see a line of cars and they’re all painted black” – The hearse and limos.

“With flowers and my love both never to come back” – The flowers from the funeral and her in the hearse. He talks about his heart being black because of his loss.

“I could not foresee this thing happening to you” – It was an unexpected and sudden death .

“If I look hard enough into the setting sun, my love will laugh with me before the morning comes” – This refers to her in Heaven.

The Rolling Stones wrote this as a much slower, conventional soul song. When Bill Wyman began fooling around on the organ during the session doing a takeoff of their original as a spoof of music played at Jewish weddings. Co-manager Eric Easton (who had been an organist), and Charlie Watts joined in and improvised a double-time drum pattern, echoing the rhythm heard in some Middle Eastern dances. This new more upbeat rhythm was then used in the recording as a counterpoint to the morbid lyrics.

On this track, Stones guitarist Brian Jones played the sitar, which was introduced to pop music by The Beatles on their 1965 song Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown). Jones made good television by balancing the instrument on his lap during appearances.

Keith Richards explained how this song came together: “We were in Fiji for about three days. They make sitars and all sorts of Indian stuff. Sitars are made out of watermelons or pumpkins or something smashed so they go hard. They’re very brittle and you have to be careful how you handle them. We had the sitars, we thought we’d try them out in the studio. To get the right sound on ‘Paint It Black’ we found the sitar fitted perfectly. We tried a guitar but you can’t bend it enough.”

This was used as the theme song for Tour Of Duty, a CBS show about the Vietnam War that ran from 1987-1989.

On the single, there is a comma before the word “black” in the title, rendering it, “Paint It, Black.” This of course changes the context, implying that a person named “Black” is being implored to paint. While some fans interpreted this as a statement on race relations, it’s far more likely that the rogue comma was the result of a clerical error, something not uncommon in the ’60s.

Mick Jagger on the song’s psychedelic sound: “That was the time of lots of acid. It has sitars on it. It’s like the beginnings of miserable psychedelia. That’s what the Rolling Stones started – maybe we should have a revival of that.”

U2 did a cover for the 7″ B-side of “Who’s Gonna Ride Your Wild Horses,” and used some of it in live versions of “Bad.” Other artists who have covered the song include Deep Purple, Vanessa Carlton, GOB, Tea Party, Jonny Lang, Face to Face, Earth Crisis, W.A.S.P., Rage, Glenn Tipton, Elliott Smith, Eternal Afflict, Anvil, and Risa Song.

Jack Nitzsche played keyboards. Besides working with The Stones, Nitzsche arranged records for Phil Spector and scored many movies. Nitzsche had an unfortunate moment when he appeared on the TV show Cops after being arrested for waving a gun at a guy who stole his hat. He died of a heart attack in 2000 at age 63.

The Stones former manager Allen Klein owned the publishing rights to this song. In 1965, The Stones hired him and signed a deal they would later regret. With Klein controlling their money, The Stones signed over the publishing rights to all the songs they wrote up to 1969. Every time this is used in a commercial or TV show, Klein’s estate (he died in 2009) gets paid.

This is featured in the closing credits of the movie The Devil’s Advocate. It is also heard at the end of Stanley Kubrick’s movie Full Metal Jacket, where it serves as an allegory of the sorrow of the sudden death in the song relating to the emotional death of the men in the film, and of all men in war.

Brian Jones had a lot of input into this song, but was left off the songwriting credits (Mick Jagger and Keith Richards are the credited writers). Jones did the arrangements for “Paint It Black” and many other songs around this time, but according to Keith Richards, he never presented a finished song to the group, which kept him off the credits.

Jones was a founding member of the Stones and key to their early success. He was still going strong when this song was released in 1966, but fell off a year later when his drug use caught up to him and his girlfriend, Anita Pallenberg, left him for Richards. By June 1969, he was a liability, and the Stones fired him. Less than a month later he drowned in his swimming pool at age 27.

His notable contributions to the group include lead guitar on “Get Off of My Cloud” and recorder on “Ruby Tuesday,” but his work on “Paint It Black” may have been his greatest musical achievement. “Brian’s sitar line not only makes the song happen but also turns it into a timeless classic,” Danny Garcia, director of the film Rolling Stone: Life and Death of Brian Jones, told Songfacts.

Paint if Black Lyrics

I see a red door and I want it painted black
No colors anymore, I want them to turn black
I see the girls walk by dressed in their summer clothes
I have to turn my head until my darkness goes

I see a line of cars and they're all painted black
With flowers and my love, both never to come back
I see people turn their heads and quickly look away
Like a newborn baby it just happens ev'ryday

I look inside myself and see my heart is black
I see my red door and I must have it painted black
Maybe then I'll fade away and not have to face the facts
It's not easy facing up when your whole world is black

No more will my green sea go turn a deeper blue
I could not foresee this thing happening to you
If I look hard enough into the setting sun
My love will laugh with me before the morning comes

I see a red door and I want it painted black
No colors anymore I want them to turn black
I see the girls walk by dressed in their summer clothes
I have to turn my head until my darkness goes

I want to see your face painted black, black as night, black as coal
Don't want to see the sun, flying high in the sky
I want to see it painted, painted, painted, painted black, yea

Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, "Paint It Black"

Courtesy of Songfacts

For “Gloria” I chose Van’s version from The Essential Van Morrison as he sounds so great here.

Them was a garage band from Belfast. “Gloria” was written by Van Morrison, who was their lead singer. The song is about a girl who comes by for (presumably) sexual encounters.

The recorded version is a tidy two and a half minutes with nothing explicit, but when Them (and later The Doors) would perform the song live, it often became an extended jam with Morrison going into more graphic, spoken-word detail about the encounter. Anyone who wondered just what happened when a groupie came by to see a willing rock star was given a first-hand account.

According to Van Morrison, the song was titled after his cousin Gloria, who was 13 years older. The song is not about her though.
In December 1964, this was released as the B-side of the Them single “Baby Please Don’ t Go,” which was a cover of a blues standard. “Gloria” gained traction when it became a highlight of the group’s live shows, sometimes developing into a 20-minute jam.

The song got little airplay in England, but found a following in America among the same garage rock audience that loved “Louie Louie.” In the US, it was first released (as the B-side) in March 1965, but was reissued as the A-side of the single in April 1966, which is when it charted at #71. It became the most well known song for the group, despite its humble beginnings.

At this stage in their career, session musicians played on Them’s records instead of the actual band, although Van Morrison did the real singing. One of these session players was Jimmy Page, who played guitar on this song. He did a lot of studio work before going on to fame with The Yardbirds and Led Zeppelin.

The Shadows of Knight made a version that hit #10 in the US two years later. It became a very popular song to cover because it’s easy to play on guitar and contains an anthemic chorus (G-L-O-R-I-A).

Some of the other groups to record the song include I ragazzi del sole (1966), Blues Magoos (1967), Patti Smith (1975, with a line from her poem Oath added at the beginning: “Jesus died for somebody’s sins but not mine”), The Doors (1983), Count Five (1991), Eddie & The Hot Rods (1997), Rickie Lee Jones (2001), Simple Minds (2001) and Popa Chubby (2001).

Van Morrison released his own version in 1974.

Courtesy of Songfacts

GLORIA - Lyrics

Like to tell you 'bout my baby
 You know she comes around
 Just 'bout five feet-four
 A-from her head to the ground
 You know she comes around here
 At just about midnight
 She make me feel so good, Lord
 She make me feel all right

 And her name is G-L-O-R-I-A
 G-L-O-R-I-A
 Gloria!
 G-L-O-R-I-A
 Gloria!
 I'm gonna shout it all night
 Gloria!
 I'm gonna shout it every day
 Gloria!
 Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah

 She comes around here
 Just about midnight
 She make me feel so good, Lord
 I want to say she make me feel all right
 Comes a-walkin' down my street
 Then she comes up to my house
 She knock upon my door
 And then she comes to my room
 Yeah, and she make me feel all right

 G-L-O-R-I-A
 Gloria!
 G-L-O-R-I-A
 Gloria!
 I'm gonna shout it all night
 Gloria!
 I'm gonna shout it every day
 Gloria!
 Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah
 So good
 Gloria!
 All right
 Feels so good
 Gloria!
 All right, yeah
 Writer/s: Van Morrison 
 Publisher: Warner Chappell Music, Inc.
 Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – Windmills of Your Mind

Song Lyric Sunday prompts for this week are Circle, Polygon, Square and Triangle. The first song that popped into my mind was Windmills of Your Mind by Noel Harrison. I have included his video lower down on this post. I chose not to feature it as his words were so rushed. The lyrics of this song are so beautiful and should be savored so I went with Sting’s version from the 1999 remake of the movie, The Thomas Crown Affair, featuring Pierce Brosnan and Rene Russo. It is much slower and dreamier. I hope you enjoy it.

 

The song was first featured in the 1968 Steve McQueen movie The Thomas Crown Affair. Director Norman Jewison wanted a song that sounded like The Beatles “Strawberry Fields Forever” for a scene where McQueen’s character is flying a glider. The song provided a contrast to the visual: McQueen appeared firmly in control, but the music made viewers feel the trepidation going through his mind.

Songwriters Michel Legrand and Marilyn and Alan Bergman wrote this. It took them a while to come up with the title, which they chose because they thought it was interesting.

This won the 1969 Oscar for Best Song From A Film.
Harrison was the son of the British actor Rex Harrison. He is best known in the US for co-starring with Stefanie Powers in the popular ’60s TV spy series The Girl From U.N.C.L.E.

Dusty Springfield recorded a popular version of this song on her 1969 album Dusty In Memphis. >>

Marilyn Bergman recalled to the ASCAP Extended Songwriters’ Workshop how this song came about: “That was an assignment, for a picture called The Thomas Crown Affair. It was a picture about a very wealthy playboy who has been everywhere and done everything, and for a thrill, plans a very complicated bank heist. There was a scene in which he is flying a glider for pleasure while he’s planning the bank heist, and the director shot six- or seven-minutes of him circling in the glider — which is a dream for a songwriter: no dialogue, no sound effects, just a little shoosh of wind. Norman Jewison, the director, wanted a song that exposed no character, that didn’t tell any plot – he just wanted the restlessness and uneasiness of the character underlined. Michel wrote six or seven full melodies, and when we work with him, we write to his melodies, because even though he expresses himself perfectly in English, his French accent is such that things can come out sounding a little like calypso songs! He played us these wonderful melodies, and we agreed to sleep on it. The next morning all three of us had independently chosen this oddball melody, almost baroque in feel. It was the opposite of what we had thought we would have chosen the night before.”
Alan Bergman added: “I think we chose it because it’s kind of a ribbon, a circular melody that reflected the flight of a glider very well.”

Noel Harrison once said of this song: “It didn’t seem like a big deal at the time. I went to the studio one afternoon, sang it and pretty much forgot about it. I didn’t realize until later what a timeless, beautiful piece Michel Legrand and the Bergmans had written. It turned out to be my most notable piece of work.”

In the 1999 remake of The Thomas Crown Affair, this song appears twice: first by Chico O’Farrill and His Orchestra, then by Sting over the closing credits.

Harrison had trouble with the lyric, “Like a tunnel that you follow to a tunnel of its own, down a hollow to a cavern where the sun has never shone.” Marilyn Bergman recalled: “In Britain, they don’t say ‘shone’ in the past tense. They say ‘shon,’ rhyming with ‘upon.’ The sun ‘shon’ yesterday. He started to sing the song and he sang ‘tunnel of its own… where the sun has never shon.’ We said ‘No, it’s shone.’ And he said ‘No, it’s our language!’ And we said, ‘Yes, but it’s our song.’ So reluctantly, he sang ‘shone’ and our rhyme was intact.”

Lyrics

Round like a circle in a spiral, like a wheel within a wheel
Never ending or beginning on an ever spinning reel
Like a snowball down a mountain, or a carnival balloon
Like a carousel that's turning running rings around the moon
Like a clock whose hands are sweeping past the minutes of its face
And the world is like an apple whirling silently in space
Like the circles that you find in the windmills of your mind!

Like a tunnel that you follow to a tunnel of its own
Down a hollow to a cavern where the sun has never shone
Like a door that keeps revolving in a half forgotten dream
Or the ripples from a pebble someone tosses in a stream
Like a clock whose hands are sweeping past the minutes of its face
And the world is like an apple whirling silently in space
Like the circles that you find in the windmills of your mind!

Keys that jingle in your pocket, words that jangle in your head
Why did summer go so quickly, was it something that you said?
Lovers walking along a shore and leave their footprints in the sand
Is the sound of distant drumming just the fingers of your hand?
Pictures hanging in a hallway and the fragment of a song
Half remembered names and faces, but to whom do they belong?
When you knew that it was over you were suddenly aware
That the autumn leaves were turning to the color of her hair!
Like a circle in a spiral, like a wheel within a wheel
Never ending or beginning on an ever spinning reel
As the images unwind, like the circles that you find 
In the windmills of your mind!

Written by Michel Legrand and Marilyn and Alan Bergman

Courtesy of Songfacts

Song Lyric Sunday – Strawberry Wine

Our prompts for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday are Banana, Cherry, Strawberry and Olive. I wanted to share Strawberry Wine by Deana Carter. It’s a sweet song and I have always enjoyed it.

I wasn’t able to embed the official video into this post so if you’d like to see Deana Carter in action please click here. Otherwise the video below is just as good.

This is a song about a girl’s first love. The title is a reference to Boone’s Farm Strawberry Hill, a very inexpensive and fruity wine that is very popular with teenage girls getting their first sips of alcohol. The wine, like the first love, is sweet and intoxicating, providing a valid metaphor for the song.

This was the first single from the album, and it went to #1 on the US country chart. In 1997, the Country Music Association named it Single of the Year. 

The song was written by Matraca Berg and Gary Harrison and tells of Berg’s own coming of age as a teenager outside of Luck, Wisconsin. She and her friends would sneak off and drink strawberry wine, often getting sick in the process but making indelible memories.

Berg recalled to AOL’s The Boot: “My dad is a farm boy from Wisconsin, and I used to go up there and stay with [my grandparents] Inga and Elmer Berg, and I met a boy up there. My Grandma Berg just kept having babies, so my aunts were my age. So we used to run around and get in a lot of trouble together, chase boys and whatnot. I told Gary this story, and he latched right onto it. We wrote it quickly, in about three or four hours. We really liked it but we thought nobody else probably would. Pat [Higdon, my publisher] was having this tent showcase with label people and artists coming to listen to the new stuff that we’d all written. And that was the only new song I had. I looked at the floor the whole time, because I was so nervous. When I looked up after playing the song for him, he was grinning from ear to ear. Deana Carter was there, and she was the only artist that showed up. She wanted the song for her first record. The song had made the rounds for a little while before she recorded it, and everybody passed on it [including Trisha Yearwood].”

Courtesy of Songfacts

Lyrics

He was working through college on my grandpa's farm
I was thirsting for knowledge and he had a car
I was caught somewhere between a woman and a child
When one restless summer we found love growing wild
On the banks of the river on a well beaten path
It's funny how those memories they last
Like strawberry wine and seventeen
The hot July moon saw everything
My first taste of love oh bittersweet
Green on the vine
Like strawberry wine

I still remember when thirty was old
And my biggest fear was September when he had to go
A few cards and letters and one long distance call
We drifted away like the leaves in the fall
But year after year I come back to this place
Just to remember the taste
Of strawberry wine and seventeen
The hot July moon saw everything
My first taste of love oh bittersweet
Green on the vine
Like strawberry wine

The fields have grown over now
Years since they've seen the plow
There's nothing time hasn't touched
Is it really him or the loss of my innocence
I've been missing so much

Like strawberry wine and seventeen
The hot July moon saw everything
My first taste of love oh bittersweet
Green on the vine
Like strawberry wine
Strawberry wine
Strawberry wineWriter/s: GARY HARRISON, MATRACA BERG 
Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Universal Music Publishing Group
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – Chicken Lips and Lizard Hips

Song Lyric Sunday was a bit of a challenge for me this week with the prompts of Alligator, Crocodile, Snake and Lizard. Two obvious songs came to mind but I avoided them wanting to give others a chance to use them and stretch myself to search for something else. I am happy I did because I found a song performed by Bruce Springsteen, called Chicken Lips and Lizard Hips. I hadn’t heard it before but if you have young kids it’s a fun song to sing with them. The lyrics are hilarious! I hope you enjoy it.

Oh and just for balance, I included some Lizard Life by ZZ Top at the end!

Info

Chicken Lips and Lizard Hips is a 1986 song by Nancy Cassidy. See the original Nancy Cassidy version for more details.

Bruce Springsteen recorded a version of the song for the 1991 Disney charity various artists album For Our Children, benefiting the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation. The lyrics below are Bruce Springsteen’s official studio version as released in 1991.

Studio Recording

Bruce Springsteen recorded the song in late 1990 at Record Plant in Los Angeles, CA. The song was recorded and mixed by Toby Scott with Rob Jaczko and Allen Abrahamson. Springsteen first recorded the traditional song PONY BOY for the upcoming Disney charity album, but he replaced at the last minute with a cover of Nancy Cassidy’s song which he discovered in his son’s nursery. According to Brucebase, another recording of the song was made, featuring additional vocals by Patti Scialfa.

Official Releases

Bruce Springsteen’s cover of CHICKEN LIPS AND LIZARD HIPS was released in January 1991 on the Disney charity album For Our Children. The song was also released in 1991 on a withdrawn Australian CD single. A 10th anniversary edition of the album was released in October 1999. The song was also included on Every Child Deserves A Lifetime, an album released in October 2007 and compiling tracks from the For Our Children series.

Lyrics

Alright
A-one, two, a-one, two, three, four

This is for all you kids out there that hate your mom and pop forcing you to eat
everything that's on your dinner plate every night.

Yeah, when I was a little kid, see, I never liked to eat
And Mama'd put things on my plate and I'd dump 'em on her feet
But then one day she made this soup, I ate it all in bed
I asked her what she put in it, and, well, this is what she said:

Oh, chicken lips and lizard hips and alligator eyes
And monkey legs and buzzard eggs and salamander thighs
Well, rabbit ears and camel rears and tasty toenail pies
Stir 'em all together and it's Mama's soup surprise

Well, now I went into the bathroom and I stood beside the sink
I said, "I'm feeling slightly ill, and I think I'd like a drink"
Mama said, "I've just the thing, I'll get it in a wink
It's full of lots of protein, and vitamins, I think"

It was chicken lips and lizard hips and alligator eyes
Yeah, monkey legs and buzzard eggs and salamander thighs
Rabbit ears and camel rears and tasty toenail pies
Stir 'em all together, it's Mama's soup surprise

Information and Lyrics Courtesy of SpringsteenLyrics.com

Lyrics

I got the attitude
And that's all I ever say
Don't have to tell nobody
How their tail ought to lay
Had a sudden revelation
The heights that I've sunken down to
And I don't mind I can't find
My way out of this witch's brew
Livin' for the lizard life
Livin' for the lizard life
I stumbled on the way around
My own reality
Gettin' right-tightly wound
Past the pale of normality
I like big loungin' every day
On the iguana side of town
The lizard love, it mighty deep
Talkin' way underground
Livin' for the lizard life
Livin' for the lizard life
Livin' for the lizard life
Livin' for the lizard life
I be a reptile all day… More

Source: LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – Blackbird

This week, host of Song Lyric Sunday, Jim Adams, has given us prompts of Bird, Cat, Dog, Fish and Pet. You could say we have been spoilt for choice because I can think of many songs for each prompt. I am curious to see what everyone chooses. My pick is a favorite Beatles song, Blackbird. The backstory is interesting and I hope you enjoy this lovely song and Paul McCartney’s melodic voice and beautiful lyrics.

Paul McCartney wrote this about the civil rights struggle for African Americans after reading about race riots in the US. He penned it in his kitchen in Scotland not long after an incident in Little Rock when the federal courts forced the racial desegregation of the Arkansas capital’s school system.

“I was sitting around with my acoustic guitar and I’d heard about the civil rights troubles that were happening in the ’60s in Alabama, Mississippi, Little Rock in particular,” he told GQ. “I just thought it would be really good if I could write something that if it ever reached any of the people going through those problems, it might give them a little bit of hope. So, I wrote ‘Blackbird.'”

Only three sounds were recorded: Paul’s voice, his Martin D-28 acoustic guitar, and a tapping that keeps time on the left channel.

This tapping sound is a bit of a mystery, although in the Beatles Anthology video McCartney appears to be making the sound with his foot. Some sources have claimed it is a metronome.

The birds were dubbed in later using sound effects from the collection at Abbey Road, where the song was recorded.

McCartney did not have ornithological intentions when he wrote this song. In England, “bird” is a term meaning “girl,” so the song is a message to a black girl, telling her it’s her time to fly:

All your life
You were only waiting for this moment to arise

The guitar accompaniment for this song was inspired by Bach’s Bourrée in E minor for lute. This is often played on classical guitar, an instrument Paul McCartney and George Harrison had tried to learn when they were kids. McCartney told Mojo magazine October 2008: “We had the first four bars (of the Bourrée in E minor) and that was as far as my imagination went. I think George had it down for a few more bars and then he crapped out. So I made up the next few bars, and (sings his four-note variation Bach’s theme) it became the basis of ‘Blackbird.'”

This is one of the songs novice guitar players often try to learn, as it’s one of the most famous finger-style tunes. The singer Donovan claims some credit for teaching The Beatles a technique similar to the one McCartney used here when they were on a retreat to India in early 1968.

The word “bird” had been floating around Paul McCartney’s musical lexicon since 1958 when the Everly Brothers had a hit with “Bird Dog,” a song about a guy trying to steal another dude’s girl. McCartney was a huge fan of the Everly Brothers. Just for fun, here is a video of Bird Dog by the Everly Brothers.

There have been hundreds of covers of this song. Perhaps the most enduring is Brad Mehldau’s instrumental jazz version, released in 1997. The only charting version of the song was by the Cast of Glee, which took it to #37 in 2011. Other notable covers include renditions by José Feliciano, Billy Preston, Sarah Vaughan, Jaco Pastorius, Crosby, Stills & Nash, Bobby McFerrin and Dwight Twilley. The Doves did a cover in 2002 for the soundtrack to the TV series Roswell.

The singer-guitarist Kenny Rankin recorded it for his 1974 album Silver Morning. McCartney was a big fan of Rankin’s rendition: when the Songwriters Hall of Fame inducted Lennon and McCartney in 1987, McCartney skipped the ceremony but had Rankin accept the award on his behalf and perform “Blackbird.”

The “broken wings” concept had been fluttering about for a while, notably in Kahlil Gibran’s 1912 story The Broken Wings. (The Beatles song “Julia” uses lines from one of Gibran’s poems, but McCartney has never cited him as an influence on “Blackbird.”) In 1985, the American group Mr. Mister released their #1 hit “Broken Wings,” which was directly inspired by The Broken Wings and like “Blackbird,” used the line, “Take these broken wings and learn to fly.”

Foo Fighters frontman Dave Grohl told Q magazine that he feels this is the greatest Paul McCartney song. He commented: “It’s such a beautiful piece of music, perfect in composition and performance, and in its lyrics and in the range of his voice. Just learning that song made me a better guitar player and gave me a better appreciation of songwriting. To me it’s just musical bliss.”

At the Academy Awards ceremony in 2016, Dave Grohl performed this song to accompany the “in memoriam” segment, recognizing those in the movie industry who died the previous year.

Blackbird Singing is the title of a book of poems McCartney wrote

This is one of about 12 Beatles songs that McCartney often played in his live shows throughout his career. It lends itself to live performance because it is rather compact (it runs just 2:18) and can be played with just a guitar.

Courtesy of Songfacts

Lyrics

Blackbird singing in the dead of night
Take these broken wings and learn to fly
All your life
You were only waiting for this moment to arise

Blackbird singing in the dead of night
Take these sunken eyes and learn to see
All your life
You were only waiting for this moment to be free

Blackbird fly, blackbird fly
Into the light of a dark black night

Blackbird fly, blackbird fly
Into the light of a dark black night

Blackbird singing in the dead of night
Take these broken wings and learn to fly
All your life
You were only waiting for this moment to arise
You were only waiting for this moment to arise
You were only waiting for this moment to arise

Writer/s: John Lennon, Paul McCartney 
Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Tratore
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – Easy Lover

This week’s prompts for Song Lyric Sunday, hosted by Jim Adams, are Fiancé/Husband/Lover/Wife. I found plenty of Lover songs but not too many for the other categories so I chose to to go with ‘Easy Lover’ by Phil Collins and Phillip Bailey (Earth, Wind and Fire). I loved this collaboration when I first heard it back in the 80s and it was fun to rediscover it this week. I hope you enjoy it too along with the great video of two performers having fun.

Phil Collins sang on this with Bailey, who is a vocalist with Earth, Wind & Fire. Collins produced and played drums on Chinese Wall, and after recording the album, he and bass player Nathan East agreed that it didn’t have a song with enough commercial appeal to release as a single, so they sat down and wrote “Easy Lover.” It does not have deep lyrical content: The song is about a captivating woman who cannot be tamed.

Philip Bailey revealed the story behind the song in Musician magazine: “Phil and Nathan were playing around with a riff on the piano and I was walking around singing ‘Choosy Lover’ over the piano chords. We worked on it all day and put a rough version of it down on tape. The next day we said, ‘let’s check it out so we can go in and record it.’ When we heard it, we realized there was nothing wrong with it. We tried doing it again, but we kept the original.”

Phil Collins told his side of the story when he spoke with Rolling Stone in 2016. Said Collins: “I always loved Earth, Wind & Fire, and in 1984 I was asked if I would produce Philip Bailey’s solo album. People were leaning on him, racially – ‘Don’t come back with a white album. You’re one of us.’ So Philip got Nathan East to play on it also. We hit some rocky ground early on, but we worked everything out. Near the end of the sessions, Philip said, ‘We haven’t written anything together on this album.’

So we just started having a jam one night, and went round and round and turned it into a verse and a chorus. We recorded it that night so we wouldn’t forget it. That song doesn’t sound like any particular era. It’s just fantastic. The hip-hop brigade fell in love with me after ‘Easy Lover.’ They were like, ‘Where’d that come from? That ain’t black music and that ain’t white music. That’s kind of an interesting color of beige.'”

The video won the 1985 MTV award for Best Overall Performance.

Phil Collins doesn’t get a lot of play in dance clubs, but this song did pretty well in discos, which often played a remix by John Potoker that was released as a 12″ single in 1984. Potoker, who later did a remix of “Sussudio,” and also Peter Gabriel’s “Sledgehammer,” incorporated a drum track into the mix that Collins had used as a guide track.

Courtesy of Songfacts

Lyrics

Easy lover
She'll get a hold on you believe it
Like no other
Before you know it you'll be on your knees
She's an easy lover
She'll take your heart but you won't feel it
She's like no other
And I'm just trying to make you see

She's the kind of girl you dream of
Dream of keeping hold of
You'd better forget it
You'll never get it
She will play around and leave you
Leave you and deceive you
Better forget it
Oh you'll regret it

No you'll never change her, so leave it, leave it
Get out quick 'cause seeing is believing
It's the only way
You'll ever know

Easy lover
She'll get a hold on you believe it
Like no other
Before you know it you'll be on your knees
She's an easy lover
She'll take your heart but you won't feel it
She's like no other
And I'm just trying to make you see

You're the one that wants to hold her
Hold her and control her
You'd better forget it
You'll never get it
For she'll say there's no other
Till she finds another
Better forget it
Oh you'll regret it

And don't try to change her, just leave it, leave it
You're not the only one, ooh seeing is believing
It's the only way
You'll ever know, oh

No don't try to change her, just leave it, leave it
You're not the only one, ooh seeing is believing
It's the only way
You'll ever know, oh

She's an easy lover (she's a easy lover)
She'll get a hold on you believe it (get a hold on you)
(She's) like no other
Before you know it you'll be on your knees
(you'll be down on your knees)
She's an easy lover
She'll take your heart but you won't feel it
(you won't feel it)
She's like no other
And I'm just trying to make you see (trying to make you see

Writer/s: Philip James Bailey, Phil Collins, Nathan East 
Publisher: CONCORD MUSIC PUBLISHING LLC,
THE BICYCLE MUSIC COMPANY
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – End of the Line

This week our host for Song Lyric Sunday, Jim Adams, has prompted us with Begin, End, Finish and Start. I came up with a shortlist of songs I could think of and settled for “End of the Line” by the Traveling Wilburys. I love the chance to see the late George Harrison and Tom Petty together in this great video.

“End of the Line” is a song by the British-American supergroup the Traveling Wilburys. Released in October 1988, it was the final track on their debut album, Traveling Wilburys Vol. 1. It was also issued as the band’s second single, in January 1989. The recording features all the Wilburys except Bob Dylan as lead singers: George Harrison, Jeff Lynne (ELO) and Roy Orbison sing the choruses in turn, while Tom Petty sings the verses. The song was mainly written by Harrison and was assigned to his publishing company, Umlaut Corporation. In keeping with the collaborative concept behind the Wilburys project, however, all five members received a songwriting credit.

They were named after a slang term that George Harrison and Jeff Lynne gave to studio equipment. The pair referred to equalizers and limiters as “wilburys,” as in “we’ll bury that mistake in the mix.”

The music video for “End of the Line” was directed by Willy Smax. It was filmed in Los Angeles shortly after Orbison’s death in December 1988, and features Dylan’s participation. To honor Orbison, a shot of a guitar sitting in a rocking chair next to a photo of him was used when his vocals are heard.

The Traveling Wilburys recorded two albums, the first in 1988 and the second in 1990, though Roy Orbison died before the second was laid down.

Their 1988 album Travelling Wilburys Volume One won the 1989 Grammy award for Best Rock Performance by a Group with Vocals.

In the United States, the single peaked at No. 63 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, while peaking at No. 2 on the Album Rock Tracks chart, blocked out the top spot by “Driven Out” by The Fixx and “Working on It” by Chris Rea.

The song was used over the end credits of the final episode of the British sitcom One Foot in the Grave and the American comedy Parks and Recreation.

“End of the Line” appeared in the George Harrison-produced cult comedy Checking Out.

A version sung by Dennis Waterman was used as the theme tune for the pilot of the BBC production New Tricks. The song has also been included in TV spots for the 2004 film The Terminal, as well as the trailer for the 2007 hit comedy Knocked Up.

Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers played this song live during their 2008 North American tour.

Harrison was honoured in the parody song “No Where Near the End of My Time” by radio on-air personality Bob Rivers.

The song was used on the end credits of the Australian family comedy film Red Dog: True Blue in 2016 and for an episode of HBO’s Crashing in 2018.

Courtesy of Songfacts and Wiki

Lyrics

Well it's all right, riding around in the breeze
Well it's all right, if you live the life you please
Well it's all right, doing the best you can
Well it's all right, as long as you lend a hand

You can sit around and wait for the phone
to ring (end of the line)
Waiting for someone to tell you everything (end of the line)
Sit around and wonder what tomorrow will bring
(end of the line)
Maybe a diamond ring

Well it's all right, even if they say you're wrong
Well it's all right, sometimes you gotta be strong
Well it's all right, as long as you got somewhere to lay
Well it's all right, everyday is judgment day

Maybe somewhere down the road aways (end of the line)
You'll think of me, wonder where I am these days
(end of the line)
Maybe somewhere down the road when somebody plays
(end of the line)
Purple haze

Well it's all right, even when push comes to shove
Well it's all right, if you got someone to love
Well it's all right, everything'll work out fine
Well it's all right, we're going to the end of the line

Don't have to be ashamed of the car I drive
(end of the line)
I'm just glad to be here, happy to be alive
(end of the line)
It don't matter if you're by my side
(end of the line)
I'm satisfied

Well it's all right, even if you're old and grey
Well it's all right, you still got something to say
Well it's all right, remember to live and let live
Well it's all right, the best you can do is forgive

Well it's all right, riding around in the breeze
Well it's all right, if you live the life you please
Well it's all right, even if the sun don't shine
Well it's all right, we're going to the end of the line

Wrirer/s: Robert Dylan, George Harrison, Jeffrey Lynne, Roy Kelton Orbison, Thomas Earl Petty 
Publisher: BMG Rights Management, THE BICYCLE MUSIC COMPANY, CONCORD MUSIC PUBLISHING LLC

Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

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