Category: Song Lyric Sunday

Song Lyric Sunday – Motown – Ooo Baby Baby

It’s Motown Week at Song Lyric Sunday! I have chosen an old favorite by Smokey Robinson and the Miracles, Ooo Baby Baby. It’s such a sexy break up/make up smoochy song. I love it.

Have a great Sunday.

The Song

The song is about cheating, with the singer apologizing for stepping out on his girl and letting her know that he’s all torn up about it. Robinson insists it isn’t autobiographical.

When Smokey Robinson appeared on American Idol in 2009, he said that this song came about by accident. The Miracles used to sing a medley of love songs on stage, and at the end of the medley (a song called “Please Say You Want Me” by the Schoolboys) he broke off into singing “ooh, baby baby.” The Miracles were so in tune that the other members started harmonizing with him, and the crowd went crazy. They incorporated this bit into their live act, then used it as the basis for the song when they decided to record it.

Smokey Robinson wrote this with fellow Miracle Pete “Warren” Moore. It is now considered the Miracles’ signature song.

According to the Rolling Stone Top 500 Songs, “Robinson called this ballad his ‘National anthem,’ noting, ‘Wherever we go, it’s the one song that everybody asks for.'”

This is one of the most confusingly credited songs of all time; the title sometimes appears as “Ooo Baby Baby” instead of “Ooh Baby Baby,” and the group alternately listed as The Miracles or Smokey Robinson & the Miracles. We’ve even seen a demo 45 where the song is listed as “Oo Baby Baby.”

On most compilation albums, the song is listed as “Ooo Baby Baby.”

It is officially published as “Ooh Baby Baby,” with the alternate titles covering all the permutations:

“Baby Baby”
“Oh Baby Baby”
“Ooo Baby Baby”
“Oo Baby Baby”

Linda Ronstadt, who also covered the Miracles song “The Tracks Of My Tears,” released a version of this song that went to #7 US in 1979. The Five Stairsteps also charted with the song, taking it to #63 US in 1967. Other popular versions are by Shalamar, Sylvester and Ella Fitzgerald.
John Lennon, a huge fan of American soul music, copped the “I’m Crying” line in “I Am The Walrus” from the refrain in this song.

Lenny Kravitz covered the song for his 2014 Strut album. Kravitz told The Daily Telegraph that he rarely does covers, but an unexpected blast of this tune left him wanting to record it. “One morning early I was having my make up done for Hunger Games and the make-up artist was listening to a Motown station and it came on,” he said. “I hadn’t heard it for a long time (and) it sounded so beautiful.”

Courtesy of Songfacts

The Lyrics

Ooo la la la la
I did you wrong my heart went out to play
But in the game I lost you
What a price to pay, hey I'm crying

Ooo baby baby
Ooo baby baby

Mistakes I know I've made a few
But I'm only human
You've made mistakes too, I'm crying

Ooo baby baby
Ooo baby baby

I'm just about at the end of my rope
But I can't stop trying I can't give up hope
'Cause I feel that one day I'll hold you near
Whisper I still love you
Until that day is here I'm crying

Ooo baby baby
Ooo baby baby
Ooo baby baby
Ooo baby baby ooo

Writer/s: CLIFFORD N. BRANCH JR., PHYLLIS ROBINSON
Publisher: Universal Music Publishing Group
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – Reflections

Our friend Clive, from Take it Easy, has offered up this week’s Song Lyric Sunday prompt and it is “Songs with a recognizable intro”. I have chosen Reflections by the Supremes. The intro to this song is memorable, well at least to me. The album Reflections was released in 1967. The song was also used as the theme for a TV drama here in the States called China Beach about the Vietnam War. It ran from late 80s to early 90s and was the springboard for some now recognizable.actors.

The Song

“Reflections” was written by the Motown songwriting team of Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier and Eddie Holland. In a Songfacts interview with Dozier, he explained: “It’s about when the love has gone bad, or when things have changed in life. One thing in life that’s ever changing is tomorrow is always different from today. Things change for many reasons, and you have to be aware of why, and what is happening around you. You have to adapt to the changes in life. That’s what that was about: your reflection on how things used to be, can be and will be, hopefully.

It’s all about hope, too. The main theme of that song is hope: although things have come to pass, you have to start changing, remembering the old to get involved with a new approach in life.”
This song tells the story of a woman who looks back in anguish at her lost love, wondering what could have been had things worked out. But the song was directed in some ways at Motown head Barry Gordy, with the same sentiment.

Starting with “Where Did Our Love Go” in 1964, the Holland-Dozier-Holland team wrote nine #1 hits for The Supremes as well as many big songs for The Four Tops, Martha & the Vandellas, and several other acts on the label. After a few years of runaway success, the three writers demanded publishing rights to their songs, but were rebuffed by Gordy. This was when they wrote “Reflections,” which pleased Gordy by providing yet another hit for The Supremes, but portended the departure of Holland-Dozier-Holland, who left a short time later, breaking their contract in the process. The legal tussle between Gordy and his former star writers stretched on for many years.

Sonically, this was a departure for The Supremes, with no saxophone or prominent electric guitar backbeat. It retained the sturdy bassline of James Jamerson, but featured a Wurlitzer electric piano by Earl Van Dyke and tambourine by Jack Ashford. Pistol Allen was the drummer and Joe Messina added guitar. The oscillator-generated sound effects also appear throughout the track.

This was the first foray for The Supremes into psychedelic pop, a sound fully realized by The Beatles a month earlier when they released their Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album.

“Reflections” has some mind-bending lyrics:

Trapped in a world
that’s a distorted reality

It also opens with some trippy sound effects that were created with a custom oscillator designed by one of The Funk Brothers, who were session musicians for most Motown songs of the period.

This was released during The Summer of Love (1967) when the Vietnam War was raging. This made it an appropriate choice for the theme song of the TV series China Beach, which was set in Vietnam during the war. The series ran on ABC from 1988-1991

The Lyrics

Through the mirror of my mind
Time after time
I see reflections of you and me

Reflections of
The way life used to be
Reflections of
The love you took from me

Oh, I'm all alone now
No love to shield me
Trapped in a world
That's a distorted reality

Happiness you took from me
And left me all alone
With only memories

Through the mirror of my mind
Through all these tears that I'm crying
Reflects a hurt I can't control
Although you're gone
I keep holding on
To those happy times
Oh, girl when you were mine

As I peer through the windows
Of lost time
Keeping looking over my yesterdays
And all the love I gave all in vain
(All the love) All the love
That I've wasted
(All the tears) All the tears
That I've tasted
All in vain

Through the hollow of my tears
I see a dream that's lost
From the hurt baby
That you have caused

Everywhere I turn
Seems like everything I see
Reflects a hurt I can't control

In you I put
All my hope and trust
Right before my eyes
My whole world has turned to dust

Reflections of
The love you took from
Reflections of
The way life used to be

In you I put
All my hope and trust
Right before my eyes
My whole world has turned to dust

Now baby, why did you do it?
Reflections

Writer/s: DAVID BRYAN BENOIT 
Publisher: Universal Music Publishing Group
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind


Courtesy of Songfacts

Song Lyric Sunday – Van Morrison – Cover of Rolling Stone

Artists who have appeared on the cover of Rolling Stone Magazine is our prompt for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday. What a fantastic subject suggested by our host Jim Adams! It was fun just scrolling through the list going back to the 1960s. My choice is probably my most favorite artist of all time, Van Morrison. He appeared on issue #62 July 9, 1970. The song I picked is ‘Someone Like You’, a favorite of mine. It was written and recorded much later than the magazine issue.

The Song

“Someone Like You” is a song written by Northern Irish singer and songwriter Van Morrison and recorded on his seventeenth studio album, Poetic Champions Compose (1987). It has become a wedding and movie classic and the song subsequently furnished the framework for one of Morrison’s most popular classics and love ballads, “Have I Told You Lately”, released in 1989.

In 1987, the single charted at number 28 on the Billboard Adult Contemporary in the U.S.In 2019, it peaked at #1 on the Ireland radio airplay chart.

“Someone Like You” was recorded in the summer of 1987 at Wool Hall Studios in Beckington, Somerset with Mick Glossop as engineer.

This song was released again on two of Morrison’s compilation albums in 2007. A remastered version has been included in the album, Still on Top – The Greatest Hits and it is one of the songs on Van Morrison’s 2007 compilation album, Van Morrison at the Movies – Soundtrack Hits.

The song was featured in the following movies:

Only the Lonely (1991)
Prelude to a Kiss (1992)
French Kiss (1995)
One Fine Day (1996)
Someone Like You (2001)
Bridget Jones’s Diary (2001)
American Sniper (2014)

Charlie’s Angel Farrah Fawcett was a huge fan of Van Morrison. When the actress was dying of cancer and too sick to attend one of his concerts, the Irish singer taped it especially for her. It was one of the last things she ever watched.

Courtesy of Wiki and Songfacts

The Song Lyrics

I've been searching a long time
Someone exactly like you
I've been traveling all around the world
Waiting for you to come through

Someone like you makes it all worth while
Someone like you keeps me satisfied
Someone exactly like you

I've been travelin' a hard road
Baby, lookin' for someone exactly like you
I've been carryin' my heavy load
Waiting for the light to come shining through

Someone like you makes it all worth while
Someone like you keeps me satisfied
Someone exactly like you

I've been doin' some soul searching
To find out where you're at
I've been up and down the highway
In all kinds of foreign lands

Someone like you makes it all worth while
Someone like you keeps me satisfied
Someone exactly like you

I've been all around the world
Marching to the beat of a different drum
But just lately I have realized
Maybe the best is yet to come

Someone like you makes it all worth while
Someone like you keeps me satisfied
Someone exactly like you
Someone exactly like you
Someone exactly like you

Writer/s: Van Morrison
Publisher: BMG Rights Management
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – Famous Parents

Our friend Paula from Light Motifs II has suggested the prompt for today’s Song Lyric Sunday. It is “Singers with Famous Musician Parents”. My immediate go to is Norah Jones who came onto the scene in 2002 with her smash album ‘Come Away With Me’. Her style and beautiful voice drew in a huge fan base curious about her music and background. It turned out she was the daughter of the famous sitar player Ravi Shanker. Yes, remember him? He taught Beatles’ guitarist George Harrison how to play the sitar!

The Song

This love song is the title track to Norah Jones’ debut album, released in 2002 when she was just 22. A patient, peaceful song, it finds Jones singing about a romantic escape where the only thing that matters is that they’re together. At the time, Jones was dating her bass player, Lee Alexander.

“Come Away With Me” is one of three songs Jones wrote on the album, which was produced by the legendary Arif Mardin (Diana Ross, Aretha Franklin, Chaka Khan) and released on the jazz label Blue Note Records. Jones had final say on the tracklist and left off a number of songs she wrote herself, going with songs written by her collaborators instead. Her guitarist, Jesse Harris, has five songs on the album, including the lead single, “Don’t Know Why.”

The Come Away With Me album is a rare massive seller with no big hits. The only song to land in the Hot 100 was “Don’t Know Why,” which made #30. “Come Away with Me” was the third single, released in December 2002 after the album had been out for nine months. By this time, it has already sold millions of copies, but many were just discovering it. In February 2003, it took Album of the Year at the Grammy Awards, one of five wins for Jones that night. The album ended up selling 10 million in America to go Diamond, a certification more familiar to acts like the Bee Gees and Backstreet Boys.

The music video was directed by James Frost, whose work includes Radiohead’s “House of Cards” and Coldplay’s “Yellow.” It shows Jones driving what appears to be the 1971 Cadillac DeVille that played a very important role in her life (we’re not sure if it’s the real one or a replica, but it has Texas plates). Jones’ mother bought her the oversized vehicle when they were living in Texas and Norah needed to commute for work. The car was pretty much indestructible, so it was a safe choice.When Jones was a student at the University of North Texas, she let a friend borrow the car to transport a band that was in town from New York City. This band and their crew ended up hanging out with Jones, and one of them, Jesse Harris, stayed in touch. When Jones moved to New York to pursue music, she started collaborating with Harris and one of the other guys from that trip to Texas bought the car. For Jones, the vehicle is a symbol of her Texas roots and of her life journey.


Courtesy of Songfacts

Song Lyric Sunday – Kiss From A Rose

This week our host for Song Lyric Sunday, Jim Adams, has given us the prompts, Hug, Kiss and Embrace. I have chosen Kiss From A Rose, by Seal. This was an easy pick for me as I just happened to hear it again today. I have always liked it as it reminds me of a visit back home to the UK in the nineties. It was such a great trip and this song was being played everywhere. On checking I did notice that I had featured this song more than three years ago for another SLS prompt. I think enough time has passed and that it really doesn’t matter if I choose it again, right?

Have a great Sunday.

.

The Song

One of the more mysterious songs ever written, there has been much speculation as to the meaning of “Kiss From A Rose” – many think it has something to do with drugs, while others hear it as an expression of love or a journey to the afterlife. Seal has never explained what the song is about, offering only that there was “some kind of relationship that inspired the lyrics.” Seal bucked convention by not including printed lyrics with the album, something he did because he didn’t want to wash away anyone’s interpretation. He also says that his songs often mean more than one thing, so attributing a meaning would be too simplistic. In lieu of lyrics, Seal wrote a screed on the subject that went with the album. “I think it’s the general vibe of what I’m saying that is important and not the exact literal translation,” he wrote. “The song is always larger in the listener’s mind because with it they attach imagery which is relative to their own personal experience. So it is your perception of what I’m saying rather than what I actually way that is the key.”

Seal wrote this song sometime around 1988 when he was living in a squat in Kensal Green, London. He says it was a liberating time, as it was before he had a record deal and there was no pressure on him. He didn’t know how to play any instruments, so he sang the instrumental parts onto a 4-track tape recorder as an experiment. He tossed the tape aside and thought nothing of it; when he recorded his 1991 debut album, he didn’t even consider it. The song was revived two years later when Seal played if for his best friend, who told Seal’s producer, Trevor Horn, about it. Horn made Seal play it for him, and he liked what he heard. They recorded the song for his second album (Seal, 1994), but they still nearly tanked it. “I thought it was too flowery and that it didn’t fit,” Seal told The Guardian. They were going to pull it from the tracklist, but reconsidered after their friend Lynne Franks heard the album-in-progress and said she liked “that song that was something about a rose.”

The song was released as a single in the UK, where it went to #20 in July 1994. In America, the song didn’t get noticed until it played under the end credits of the movie Batman Forever and was included on the soundtrack. The film was released in May 1995, nearly a year after Seal’s album was issued. The movie appearance sparked demand for the song in the US; it was issued as a single there in June 1995 and climbed to #1 in August.Batman Forever was distributed by Warner Bros., the same conglomerate that owned Seal’s US label, Sire Records. The song was submitted for a love scene featuring Nicole Kidman’s Dr. Chase Meridian character and Val Kilmer’s Batman, but the film’s director, Joel Schumacher, decided it was a better fit under the end credits.

Do you hear the lyric as “kiss from a rose on a grave?” If so, you’re not the only one, but it’s really “kiss from a rose on a gray.” David Sancious, who played keyboards on Seal’s 1998 album Human Being and joined him on the subsequent tour, found out from the source.  “We were having lunch somewhere one day and he explained it to me,” Sancious told Songfacts. “It was a poetic thing, just a little taste of poetry that happened to sound like something else.”

With its curious waltz time, lavish harmonies and epic sound proportions, “Kiss From A Rose” has a very different sound and stood out on the radio, where many stations were willing to play it. In the US, it was a #1 hit on the Adult Contemporary charts for 12 weeks.

This won Grammy Awards in 1996 for Record of the Year, Song of the Year and Best Pop Vocal Performance. It wasn’t eligible for an Oscar because the song appeared on Seal’s album before it was used in the film.

Courtesy of Songfacts

The Lyrics

Ba-ya-ya, ba-da, ba-da-da-da, ba-ya-ya
Ba-ya-ya, ba-da, ba-da-da-da, ba-ya-ya
Ba-ya-ya, ba-da, ba-da-da-da, ba-ya-ya
Ba-ya-ya, ba-da, ba-da-da-da, ba-ya-ya

There used to be a greying tower alone on the sea
You became the light on the dark side of me
Love remained a drug that's the high and not the pill

But did you know that when it snows
My eyes become large and
The light that you shine can't be seen?

Baby, I compare you to a kiss from a rose on the grey
Ooh, the more I get of you, the stranger it feels, yeah
And now that your rose is in bloom
A light hits the gloom on the grey

Ba-ya-ya, ba-da, ba-da-da-da, ba-ya-ya
Ba-ya-ya, ba-da, ba-da-da-da, ba-ya-ya

There is so much a man can tell you, so much he can say
You remain my power, my pleasure, my pain
Baby, to me, you're like a growing addiction that I can't deny
Won't you tell me, is that healthy, baby?

But did you know that when it snows
My eyes become large and
The light that you shine can't be seen?

Baby, I compare you to a kiss from a rose on the grey
Ooh, the more I get of you, the stranger it feels, yeah (yeah)
Now that your rose is in bloom
A light hits the gloom on the grey

I've been kissed by a rose on the grey
I've been kissed by a rose on the grey
And if I should fall, will it all go away? (I've been kissed by a rose on the grey)
I've been kissed by a rose on the grey

There is so much a man can tell you, so much he can say
You remain my power, my pleasure, my pain
To me, you're like a growing addiction that I can't deny (yeah)
No won't you tell me, is that healthy, baby?

But did you know that when it snows
My eyes become large and
The light that you shine can't be seen?

Baby, I compare you to a kiss from a rose on the grey
Ooh, the more I get of you, the stranger it feels, yeah
Now that your rose is in bloom
A light hits the gloom on the grey

Yes, I compare you to a kiss from a rose on the grey
Ooh, the more I get of you, the stranger it feels, yeah (yeah)
And now that your rose is in bloom
A light hits the gloom on the grey

Ba-ya-ya, ba-da, ba-da-da-da, ba-ya-ya

Now that your rose is in bloom
A light hits the gloom on the grey

Writer/s: Henry Olusegun Adeola Samuel 
Publisher: Universal Music Publishing Group
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – If You Could Read My Mind

This week Jim Adams has prompted us with “Songs that remind us if ourselves” for Song Lyric Sunday. As I write poetry about feelings and healing, I have always been drawn to this song. The lyrics are wonderful and poetic telling the story of Gordon Lightfoot’s breakdown of his marriage.

The Song

“If You Could Read My Mind” is a song by Canadian singer-songwriter Gordon Lightfoot. It reached number one on Canadian music charts and was his first recording to appear on the American music charts, reaching number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart in February 1971. Later in the year it reached number 30 in the UK. The song also reached number one for one week on the Billboard Easy Listening chart, and was the first of four Lightfoot releases to reach number one.

This song first appeared on Lightfoot’s 1970 album Sit Down Young Stranger, which was later renamed If You Could Read My Mind following the song’s success.

Lightfoot has cited his divorce for inspiring the lyrics, saying they came to him as he was sitting in a vacant Toronto house one summer. At the request of his daughter, Ingrid, he performs the lyrics with a slight change now: the line “I’m just trying to understand the feelings that you lack” is altered to “I’m just trying to understand the feelings that we lack.” He has said in an interview that the difficulty with writing songs inspired by personal stories is that there is not always the emotional distance and clarity to make lyrical improvements such as the one his daughter suggested. 

In 1987 Lightfoot filed a lawsuit against the writer of “The Greatest Love of All”, alleging plagiarism of 24 bars of “If You Could Read My Mind”. Lightfoot has stated that he dropped the lawsuit when he felt it was having a negative effect on the singer Whitney Houston, as the lawsuit was about the writer and not her. 

The song is in A major and uses the subtonic chord.

The Lyrics


If you could read my mind love
What a tale my thoughts could tell
Just like an old time movie
About a ghost from a wishing well
In a castle dark or a fortress strong
With chains upon my feet
You know that ghost is me
And I will never be set free
As long as I’m a ghost you can see
 
If I could read your mind love
What a tale your thoughts could tell
Just like a paperback novel
The kind the drugstore sells
When you reach the part where
the heartaches come
Come the hero would be me
Heroes often fail
And you won’t read that book again
Because the ending’s just to hard to take
 
I walk away like a movie star
Who gets burned in a three way script
Enter number two, a movie queen
To play the scene of bringing all the
good things out in me
But for now love let’s be real
 
I never knew I feel this way
And I’ve got to say that I just don’t get it
I don’t know where we went wrong
But the feeling’s gone and I just can’t get it back
 
If you could read my mind love
What a tale my thoughts could tell
Just like an old time movie about a
ghost from a wishing well
In a castle dark or a fortress strong
With chains upon my feet
The story always ends
And if you read between the lines
You’ll know that I’m just trying to understand
The feeling that you left
 
I never knew I feel this way
And I’ve got to say that I just don’t get it
I don’t know where we went wrong
But the feeling’s gone
And I just can’t get it back
Source: LyricFind

Songwriters: Gordon Lightfoot
If You Could Read My Mind lyrics
© Warner Chappell Music, Inc
 


Song Lyric Sunday – When Bands Break Up

There is an interesting prompt for today’s Song Lyric Sunday from our host Jim Adams. He has asked us to find a song from a band that broke up and we wished they were still together. I have had to go to the first band that I loved as a pre-teen, The Beatles. When they broke up, well, it was the end of the world. At the time we were all in love with the look, the sweet music and of course easily swept up with the hysteria known as Beatlemania. I couldn’t understand why the Beatles would want to break up and I hated Yoko Ono for ruining everything. Of course I now know that they wanted to pursue their experimental music instead of playing for audiences who never heard them anyway because of the screaming.

Lennon and McCartney were amazing songwriters but It wasn’t until much later, after I had watched the Beatles Anthology and other documentaries, that I realized how much George Martin, their record producer, influenced their music and recordings. He was affectionately known as the “Fifth Beatle”

So my choice of song today is Eleanor Rigby which features an amazing string section, one of George Martin’s ingenious contributions. Hope you enjoy it.

The Song

Paul McCartney wrote most of this song. He got the name “Eleanor” from the actress Eleanor Bron, who appeared in the 1965 Beatles film Help!. “Rigby” came to him when he was in Bristol, England, and spotted a store: Rigby and Evens Ltd Wine and Spirit Shippers. He liked the name “Eleanor Rigby” because it sounded natural and matched the rhythm he wrote.
McCartney explained at the time that his songs came mostly from his imagination. Regarding this song, he said, “It just came. When I started doing the melody I developed the lyric. It all came from the first line. I wonder if there are girls called Eleanor Rigby?”

McCartney wasn’t sure what the song was going to be about until he came up with the line “picks up the rice in a church where a wedding has been.” That’s when he came up with the story of an old, lonely woman. The lyrics “wearing the face that she keeps in a jar by the door” are a reference to the cold-cream she wears in an effort to look younger.

The song tells the story of two lonely people. First, we meet a churchgoing woman named Eleanor Rigby, who is seen cleaning up rice after a wedding. The second verse introduces the pastor, Father McKenzie, whose sermons “no one will hear.” This could indicate that nobody in coming to his church, or that his sermons aren’t getting through to the congregation on a spiritual level. In the third verse, Eleanor dies in the church and Father McKenzie buries her.
“Father Mackenzie” was originally “Father McCartney.” Paul decided he didn’t want to freak out his dad and picked a name out of the phone book instead.

After Eleanor Rigby is buried, we learn that “no one was saved,” indicating that her soul did not elevate to heaven as promised by the church. This could be seen as a swipe at Christianity and the concept of being saved by Jesus. The song was released in August 1966 just weeks after the furor over John Lennon’s remarks, “Christianity will go. It will vanish and shrink. I needn’t argue about that; I’m right and I will be proved right. We’re more popular than Jesus now.”

For the most part, the song eluded controversy, possibly because the lilting string section made it easier to handle.

A string section scored by Beatles producer George Martin consisting of four violins, two violas and two cellos were used in recording. Paul may have been inspired by the classic composer Vivaldi.
The Beatles didn’t play any of the instruments on this track. All the music came from the string players, who were hired as session musicians.

Paul McCartney recounted this song’s origin story in a 2018 interview with GQ. He said: “When I was really little I lived on what was called a housing estate, which is like the projects – there were a lot of old ladies and I enjoyed sitting around with these older ladies because they had these great stories, in this case about World War II. One in particular I used to visit and I’d go shopping for her – you know, she couldn’t get out. So I had that figure in my mind of a sort of lonely old lady.

Over the years, I’ve met a couple of others, and maybe their loneliness made me empathize with them. But I thought it was a great character, so I started this song about the lonely old lady who picks up the rice in the church, who never really gets the dreams in her life. Then I added in the priest, the vicar, Father McKenzie. And so, there was just the two characters. It was like writing a short story, and it was basically on these old ladies that I had known as a kid.”

In Observer Music Monthly, November 2008, McCartney said: “These lonely old ladies were something I knew about growing up, and that was what ‘Eleanor Rigby’ was about – the fact that she died and nobody really noticed. I knew this went on.”

There is a gravestone for an Eleanor Rigby in St. Peter’s Churchyard in Woolton, England. Woolton is a suburb of Liverpool and Lennon first met McCartney at a fete at St. Peter’s Church. The gravestone bearing the name Eleanor Rigby shows that she died in October 1939, aged 44. However Eleanor was not like the lonely people in McCartney’s song, as she was married. Another of the gravestones there has the word “McKenzie” written on it. McCartney has denied that that is the source of the names, though he has agreed that they may have registered subconsciously.

The Lyrics

Ah, look at all the lonely people
Ah, look at all the lonely people

Eleanor Rigby
Picks up the rice in the church where a wedding has been
Lives in a dream
Waits at the window
Wearing the face that she keeps in a jar by the door
Who is it for?

All the lonely people
Where do they all come from?
All the lonely people
Where do they all belong?

Father McKenzie
Writing the words of a sermon that no one will hear
No one comes near
Look at him working
Darning his socks in the night when there's nobody there
What does he care?

All the lonely people
Where do they all come from?
All the lonely people
Where do they all belong?

Ah, look at all the lonely people
Ah, look at all the lonely people

Eleanor Rigby
Died in the church and was buried along with her name
Nobody came
Father McKenzie
Wiping the dirt from his hands as he walks from the grave
No one was saved

All the lonely people (ah, look at all the lonely people)
Where do they all come from?
All the lonely people (ah, look at all the lonely people)
Where do they all belong?

Writer/s: John Lennon, Paul McCartney
Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – Died at the Age of 27 Club

Amy Winehouse – September 24, 1983 – July 23, 2011

Jim Adams, our host for Song Lyric Sunday, has prompted us with “Members of the Died at the Age of 27 Club”. We are to choose a song by an artist who, you guessed it, died at the age of 27. Surprisingly there are quite a few. I picked Amy Winehouse and her memorable and fitting song, “Rehab”.

The Song & Artist

This song is autobiographical. Many successful musicians are haunted by their own personal demons of drink and drugs, and Winehouse is no exception. In February 2007 her father gave a candid interview to the Sun newspaper in which he denied that his daughter was an alcoholic, although he admitted that like many single women of her age she sometimes overdid the drink. On one occasion, after splitting up with her boyfriend, she fell over and hit her head.

Her previous management company wanted her to go into rehab but she said she didn’t need to. Her father agreed, adding that she wasn’t an alcoholic but had been drinking too much because she was lovesick, and “You can’t go into rehab for that.” Alcoholics drink everyday, he said, and his daughter didn’t. Hence the line: “They tried to make me go to rehab, I said no, no, no.”
Amy Winehouse was asked by The Daily Mail on August 3, 2007 how she writes songs. Said Winehouse: “With ‘Rehab’ I was walking down the street with Mark Ronson, who produced my last album. I just sang the hook out loud. It was quite silly really.”

She was then asked, “Did you sing the ‘no no no’ bit as well?'”

“Yeah, I sang the whole line exactly as it turned out on the record! Mark laughed and asked me who wrote it because he liked it. I told him that I’d just made it up but that it was true and he encouraged me to turn it into a song, which took me five minutes. It wasn’t hard. It was about what my old management company (run by former Spice Girls manager Simon Fuller) wanted me to do.”
On August 14, 2007, Winehouse entered The Causeway Retreat, a rehab center in Essex, England, with her new husband (and fellow addict), Blake Fielder. Addiction specialists know that admitting a couple to rehab together is a bad idea, but The Causeway was not an ethical institution: it was shut down amid a host of violations in 2010.

In the documentary Amy, Fielder is shown at the facility badgering Winehouse, putting a video camera to her face and asking her to sing “the new, updated version of ‘Rehab,'” presumably making a joke out of it. She refuses.

Winehouse did a few more stints in rehab to treat her drug and alcohol addiction, but it was ultimately unsuccessful. She was found dead in her London home on July 23, 2011.
This won the 2007 Ivor Novello Award for Best Contemporary Song.
At the 2008 Grammy awards, this won for Song Of The Year, Female Pop Vocal Performance and Record Of The Year. Winehouse also won for Best New Artist, and performed a medley of songs that were televised from London. Ronson won for producer of the year.

Backstage at the Grammy ceremony Mark Ronson recalled to Billboard magazine what it was like playing “Rehab” for Winehouse’s A&R for the first time. “About the first 15 seconds in, he said ‘Rewind, rewind!’ I didn’t think there would be dollar signs lighting up.”
The lines, “I’d rather be at home with Ray” and “There’s nothing you can teach me that I can’t learn from Mr. Hathaway” are references to two of Winehouse’s soul music inspirations: Ray Charles and Donny Hathaway. Hathaway is best known for his duets with Roberta Flack: “Where Is The Love?” and “The Closer I Get To You.”
Winehouse’s label Island Records originally didn’t foresee this song’s success. Island Records president Darcus Beese explained in a Genius annotation:

“When ‘Rehab’ dropped it was just like a newspaper being lit. I wasn’t expecting this song to be the one that did it. We wanted to come in with a cool angle. We thought putting Ghostface Killa on ‘You Know I’m No Good’ would be the big hit. It wasn’t until people heard ‘Rehab’ that they really got it.”

The Lyrics

[Chorus]
They tried to make me go to rehab
I said, "no, no, no"
Yes, I been black
But when I come back, you'll know, know, know
I ain't got the time
And if my daddy thinks I'm fine
He's tried to make me go to rehab
I won't go, go, go

I'd rather be at home with a Ray
I ain't got seventy days
'Cause there's nothing, there's nothing you can teach me
That I can't learn from Mr. Hathaway

I didn't get a lot in class
But I know we don't come in a shot glass

[Chorus]

The man said, "why do you think you here?"
I said, "I got no idea."
I'm gonna, I'm gonna lose my baby
So I always keep a bottle near
He said, "I just think you're depressed."
This, me, yeah, baby, and the rest

They tried to make me go to rehab
But I said, "no, no, no"
Yes, I been black
But when I come back, you'll know, know, know

I don't ever want to drink again
I just, oh, I just need a friend
I'm not gonna spend ten weeks
Have everyone think I'm on the mend

And it's not just my pride
It's just till these tears have dried

[Chorus]

Written by Amy Winehouse
Learn more about Amy Winehouse's life here
Courtesy of Songfacts

Song Lyric Sunday – Sweet Love

This week Jim Adams, our host of Song Lyric Sunday, has handed the prompt reins to fellow blogger Angie from the blog King Ben’s Grandma, She has given us “Sweet, Honey, Sugar, Candy and Chocolate”, Plenty of songs out there to fit today’s theme. I have picked Sweet Love by Anita Baker. A personal favorite from the 80s.

The Song

Sweet Love” is a song by American R&B singer and songwriter Anita Baker from her second studio album, Rapture (1986). It was written by Anita Baker, Louis A. Johnson, and Gary Bias, and produced by Michael J. Powell. It was released in July 1986, as the album’s first single.

The song was Baker’s first big hit single, peaking at number two on the US Billboard R&B chart, number three on the US Billboard Adult Contemporary chart, and number eight on the US Billboard Hot 100 in the fall of 1986. In the UK, it reached number 13 on the UK Singles Chart and peaked at number 21 on Canada’s Top Singles chart.

“Sweet Love” won the Grammy Award for Best R&B Song at the 29th Annual Grammy Awards (1987).

Daryl Easlea of the BBC said that Baker’s voice “rings like a bell”, and that “Sweet Love” is one of the three most memorable tracks on Rapture. He felt that the lyrics might have sounded trite if sung by a different artist, but that Baker imbued them with “so much passion and wonderment” that they sound like “old love sonnets” brought back to life.

Baker won two Grammys at the 29th Annual Grammy Awards (1987). “Sweet Love” was selected as Best R&B Song, earning her (along with Gary Bias and Louis Johnson) a songwriting award. Also, the album containing this song, Rapture, won in the category Best Female R&B Vocal performance.

Courtesy of Wiki

The Lyrics

With all my heart, I love you, baby
Stay with me and you will see
My arms will hold you, baby
Never leave, 'cause I believe I'm in love

Sweet love
Hear me callin' out your name
I feel no shame
I'm in love, sweet love
Don't you ever go away
It'll always be this way

Your heart has called me closer to you
I will be all that you need
Just trust
In what we're feeling
Never leave, 'cause baby, I believe
In this love

Sweet love
Hear me callin' out your name
I feel no shame
I'm in love, sweet love
Don't you ever go away
It'll always be this way

There's no stronger love in this world (no stronger love)
Oh, baby, no
You're my man, I'm your girl
I'll never go, wait and see, can't be wrong
Don't you know this is where you belong?

How sweet this dream, how lovely, baby
Stay right here, never fear
I will be all that you need
Never leave, 'cause baby, I believe
In this love

Sweet love
Hear me callin' out your name
I feel no shame
I'm in love, sweet love
Don't you ever go away
It'll always be this way

oh, no, no, no, no, no, no, no
(Sweet love) oh-ooh
So sweet
So sweet
So sweet oh, oh, love
(Sweet love) yeah, oh love
Oh baby no, sweeter love
(Sweet love) oh sweeter love
Oh no, no, no, no, no, no, no no, no
(Sweet love) don't nobody know
Don't nobody know how sweet it is
(Sweet love) how sweet it is
Love me sweetly, baby
Just leave me sweetly, baby
(Sweet love)
Don't nobody know
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Anita Baker / Gary Bias / Louis A. Johnson
Sweet Love lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Song Lyric Sunday – Australian Music – INXS

I used to be a big fan of INXS and thought front man Michael Hutchence was really hot! Sadly he was a troubled soul and took his own life by hanging himself in the closet of his hotel room in Sydney in 1999. So they are my pick for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday, Australian Music, hosted by Jim Adams. I chose their well known hit “Need You Tonight”

A documentary on Michael Hutchence’s revealed some insights into his life and state of mind at the time of his suicide. You can read about it here in Rolling Stone.

The Song

“Need You Tonight” is basically a musical booty call, with lines that could work if you’re Michael Hutchence (“All you got is this moment,” “There’s something about you girl that makes me sweat”), but would get the rest of us laughed out of the room. It’s not clear how his night ends, but he takes his best shot at the end:I’ve got to let you know
You’re one of my kind
Hutchence didn’t overthink it – he wrote the lyric in one night.

For the Kick album, INXS tried a different approach, with Michael Hutchence and Andrew Farriss (multi-instrumentalist for the band) doing all the songwriting. They wrote “Need You Tonight” and a few other tracks on the album at a studio in Hong Kong, where they worked for two weeks. Farriss came up with the rhythm track on a Roland 707 drum machine in a flash just before leaving for the airport – he was still working on it when the cab driver arrived, so he had the cabbie wait while he recorded a quick demo on cassette.In Hong Kong, he played Hutchence the cassette and Michael wrote the lyrics on the spot in about an hour, creating a sensual storyline to fit the mood of the music. Farriss brought his drum machine with him and was able rebuild the track, adding the guitar riff and a bass line he played on a keyboard bass. With Hutchence adding vocals, they recorded a proper demo of the song that they took back to Sydney, where they recorded it with their bandmates. The way the song came together that day was the same way they recorded it. The drum machine stayed, but their live drummer, Jon Farriss (one of three brothers in the band), added cymbals, toms and fills.

This was the song that launched INXS to global stardom. They had released five albums and were huge in their native Australia, but were just starting to get noticed in most other countries. Many Americans knew the band from their MTV hit “What You Need,” but they had little draw in that country. Atlantic Records knew the Kick album was a chance to break them in America, but the label pushed back when they heard the album, deeming it out of touch. INXS’ manager, Chris Murphy, addressed their concerns by setting up a tour of American colleges to promote “Need You Tonight” as the first single. If this small-scale effort went well, Atlantic could put more promotional might behind the album knowing it had at least a niche audience.So, when the single and album were released in October 1987, INXS was dispatched to places like Kalamazoo, Michigan and Poughkeepsie, New York, where they played colleges. As hoped, the tour got a great reaction and college radio stations jumped on “Need You Tonight.” Their fears assuaged, Atlantic pushed the song to commercial radio stations, which added it to their playlists.

MTV put the video in hot rotation, and on January 30, 1988, “Need You Tonight” went to #1 in America. “Devil Inside,” “New Sensation” and “Never Tear Us Apart” were the next three singles, keeping INXS on the air throughout 1988, while Kick stayed in the upper end of the albums chart the entire year.

The transition to Bono-level superstar frontman was a tumultuous one for Michael Hutchence, who struggled to stay grounded. While his bandmates formed families away from the public eye, his every move – especially his high-profile relationship with Kylie Minogue – was covered in the entertainment press. INXS didn’t release another album until 1990 when they returned with X. It was a success, but subsequent releases had more narrow appeal. Hutchence had a daughter, Tiger Lily, in 1996 with the British TV personality Paula Yates. Struggling with depression and away from his daughter, he committed suicide in 1997.

“Need You Tonight” segues seamlessly into the next track on the album, a poem Andrew Farriss wrote and put to music called “Mediate.” Both tracks are in the same tempo and based on the same drum machine groove, so they flow together very well. When the band heard how well they stitched together, they decided to segue them, à la Queen with “We Will Rock You” into “We Are The Champions.” Many radio stations play the songs together, which is how they appear in the video.

At 2:30, there’s a fake ending after Michael Hutchence sings, “I’m Lonely.” That was the only significant change the band made to the original demo

Courtesy of Songfacts

The Lyrics

Come over here

All you've got is this moment
Twenty-first century's yesterday
You can care all you want
Everybody does, yeah, that's okay

So slide over here and give me a moment
Your moves are so raw, I've got to let you know
I've got to let you know
You're one of my kind

I need you tonight
'Cause I'm not sleepin'
There's somethin' about you, girl
That makes me sweat

How do you feel? I'm lonely
What do you think? Can't think at all
What you gonna do? Gonna live my life

So slide over here and give me a moment
Your moves are so raw, I've got to let you know
I've got to let you know
You're one of my kind

I need you tonight
'Cause I'm not sleepin'
There's somethin' about you, girl
That makes me sweat

So how do you feel? I'm lonely
What do you think? Can't think at all
What you gonna do? Gonna live my life

How do you feel? I'm lonely
What do you think? Can't think at all
What you gonna do? Gonna live my life
So slide over here and give me a moment
Your moves are so raw, I've got to let you know
I've got to let you know
So slide over here and give me a moment
I've got to let you know, I've got to let you know
You're one of my kind

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Andrew Charles Farriss / Michael Kelland Hutchence
Need You Tonight lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group,
Warner Chappell Music, Inc
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