Category: Song Lyric Sunday

Song Lyric Sunday – Susie Q

We have girls’ names beginning with the letter “S” for our prompt this week for Song Lyric Sunday, hosted by Jim Adams.

My pick today is “Susie Q” by Creedence Clearwater Revival. The song has been covered by several artists over the years but this version is, in my opinion, the best. I love CCR!

This was co-written and originally recorded by rockabilly singer Dale Hawkins in 1956. His version hit US #27 a year later. Eleanor Broadwater and Stan Lewis wrote it with Hawkins.

This was Creedence Clearwater Revival’s first single (not counting “Porterville,” which was released when the band was known as The Golliwogs). They went on to become one of the biggest bands of the late ’60s and early ’70s thanks to a string of hits written by their leader, John Fogerty. Early on though, they recorded more cover songs, including “I Heard It Through The Grapevine.” “Susie Q” was their only single not written or co-written by Fogerty to reach the Top 40.

John Fogerty had big plans for “Susie Q” from the start. He intended for it to define CCR’s distinct character. In Bad Moon Rising: The Unofficial History of Creedence Clearwater Revivial, he said, “I knew I needed to work on arranging the song so that the band would sound like Creedence Clearwater Revivial, would sound professional, mysterious and also have their own definition. The song I chose was ‘Susie Q.’ I decided not to write the song myself. I decided to pick something that existed because it’d just be easier. I’d be less self-conscious about doing things.”

The album version runs 8:39. It evolved into a lengthy jam because the band had to fill long sets at their gigs.

The Rolling Stones covered this in 1964. Creedence had been playing the song at live shows, but stopped when The Stones released their version.

This was produced with liberal use of late ’60s studio tricks, including wide stereo separation, feedback, and vocal distortion.

When asked what the rhymes are in the latter part of the song, bass player Stu Cook said, “They were just simple rhymes. John hated it when songwriters used simple rhymes just to make things rhyme, so this was a statement against that. It was sort of anti-Dylan.”

This became popular on the West Coast before it was available on vinyl. The band brought a cassette tape of the song to a San Francisco DJ, who played it in appreciation for the group’s earlier support of a DJ strike.

Thanks to this song, girls named Susie are often nicknamed “Susie Q.”
The guitar riff on the original version was created by James Burton, who was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2001 as a sideman. John Fogerty said that when he heard Burton’s riff for the first time, he was in his mother’s car and got very excited. “I went crazy and immediately began banging on the dashboard.”

CCR also included a cover of Screamin’ Jay Hawkins’ (no relation to Dale) “I Put A Spell On You” on the Creedence Clearwater Revival album. The band’s label, Fantasy Records, released their renditions of these songs as singles around the same time; “Susie Q” peaked at #11 US in November 1968 and “I Put A Spell On You” reached its apex of #58 in December.

The next seven CCR singles hit the Top 4 with their A-sides:

“Proud Mary” (#2)/”Born on the Bayou”
“Bad Moon Rising” (#2)/”Lodi” (#52)
“Green River” (#2)/”Commotion” (#30)
“Down on the Corner” (#3)/”Fortunate Son” (#14 the week before Billboard decided to combine both sides into one chart position)
“Travelin’ Band”/”Who’ll Stop the Rain” (#2 combined)
“Up Around the Bend”/”Run Through the Jungle” (#4 combined)
“Lookin’ Out My Back Door”/”Long as I See the Light” (#2 combined).
The Susie Q was a popular dance step in the ’30s.

The single was titled “Susie Q (part 1)” and ran 4:33. The B-side was “Susie Q (part 2),” clocking in at 3:48.

This is one of the few Creedence songs where vocals of band members besides John Fogerty are heard. You can hear his bandmates in the second part of the song.

Courtesy of Songfacts

LYRICS

Oh Susie Q, oh Susie Q
Oh Susie Q baby I love you, Susie Q
I like the way you walk
I like the way you talk
I like the way you walk
I like the way you talk
Susie Q

Well, say that you'll be true
Well, say that you'll be true
Well, say that you'll be true and never leave me blue, Susie Q

Well, say that you'll be mine
Well, say that you'll be mine,
Well, say that you'll be mine, baby all the time, Susie Q

Uh uh 
Uh uh 
Uh uh 
Uh uh 

Oh Susie Q, oh Susie Q
Oh Susie Q, baby I love you, Susie Q

I like the way you walk
I like the way you talk
I like the way you walk I like the way you talk, Susie Q 

Oh Susie Q, oh Susie Q
Oh Susie Q, baby I love you, Susie Q

Writer/s: Dale Hawkins, Stanley J. Lewis, Eleanor Broadwater 
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – Smooth

We have been prompted with one word titles this week for Song Lyric Sunday challenge, hosted by our good friend Jim Adams. I have to go with the perennial Santana and “Smooth” featuring Rob Thomas. It’s hard for me to believe that this song is over 20 years old already! I hope you enjoy it. I know I never get tired of listening to it.

Rob Thomas from Matchbox Twenty wrote this with Itaal Shur, a songwriter and producer who has worked with Jewel, Robi Rosa and Maxwell (co-writing his first hit, “Ascension (Don’t Ever Wonder).” Shur said in a Songfacts interview: “I was already active in the music business. I had some hit records with Maxwell and I was already touring the world with Groove Collective, so people knew me more in the underground scene, but I wasn’t as big as Rob Thomas, of course. My manager at the time told me that Pete Ganbarg, who was working at the time at Arista, he was looking for music for the new Santana record. At the time, I had my own band and was performing a lot around the city. I jumped at it because I grew up with an older brother who hipped me up to classic rock and I always loved Santana.

I went up to the office and I wanted to hear what they had first to see what kind of direction they were going for, and when I went up there I heard the Wyclef track, I heard the Dave Matthews track, I heard a couple of other tracks, and I realized there wasn’t the kind of track that was, in my opinion, a standard Santana groove like ‘Black Magic Woman,’ ‘Oye Como Va,’ ‘Evil Ways.’ So I went home and wrote this track on guitar with all the arrangements called ‘Room One Seven.’ It was about this couple that meet after a long time and have a little tryst in the hotel room.

I brought it to Arista and they loved the instrumental and they liked parts of the melodies, but they didn’t like the lyrics – they thought it was a little too sexual for Santana – so they asked me if I wanted to work with Rob Thomas. I didn’t know him; I’d heard a little bit about Matchbox Twenty. He happened to live at the time in Soho very close to me. He came over and he had already written the verses to the instrumental that Arista gave him. I had a chorus that had the same melody: ‘Room One Seven on the seventeenth floor. Take the elevator and I’ll meet you at the door.’ He didn’t have a chorus, so before he came, I changed the words around to, ‘Give me the ocean, give me the moon, give me something hot to make my body move,’ and this turned into the chorus that we all know.”

Thomas sang lead on this, but that wasn’t the plan. He had never written a song for someone else before, so he jumped at the chance to write a song with Shur for Santana, figuring it would boost his songwriting bona fides. When they finished the song, Thomas suggested George Michael, one of his musical heroes, as the vocalist. Arista Records ended up asking Thomas to do the vocals, and when he did, it was in Michael’s style. “If you listen to the melody and the cadence, it’s an attempt to emulate his style in so many ways,” he told Billboard.

When Thomas launched his solo career a few years later, he once again emulated Michael, who also made the transition from a group (Wham!) to a solo artist.

Many of the lyrics are Thomas’ ode to his wife, the former Marisol Maldonado, who is Puerto Rican. “My Mu Equita” translates to “My Little Doll” in Spanish; Thomas also calls her his “Spanish Harlem Mona Lisa.” Marisol appears in the video.

GQ published an “oral history” satire of this song in 2016, which is filled with confabulations like this quote from Rob Thomas: “I didn’t even know who Carlos Santana was at this point. I actually thought he was the guy that who was in charge of Libya.”

The song’s co-writer Itaal Shur told us: “The guitar solo from my demo, Santana copied that solo, which was a huge compliment and all the breaks were also on my demo. It was really weird, my demo was kind of like a template for the live band to play. They sped up the song two beats: it was like at 1/13 and went to 1/15 and it went from A Flat Minor to A Minor. They played it as a band and recorded it all live, pretty much. Me and Rob, when we were writing the song, the verses were fine, but we went through about four or five changes with the record company; from like, ‘Give me the ocean, give me the moon,’ ‘You’re just like the ocean…’ Pete Ganbarg, who if it wasn’t for him this song wouldn’t have come together because he put me and Rob together, he said some really good comments about the lyrics – he was an English major and really picky about lyrics. It was a really good collaboration.”

This won Song Of The Year and Record Of The Year at the 2000 Grammys. Supernatural also won for Best Rock Album and Album Of The Year. >>

Clive Davis is a legendary record executive who was the mastermind behind this album. Santana had not had a hit since “Hold On” in 1982, so Davis teamed him up with contemporary musicians like Wyclef Jean, Everlast and Lauryn Hill to make sure the younger generation took notice. The result was a wildly successful album that went over well with Santana’s old fans and created a legion of new ones. This was the first single, and it spent 12 weeks at #1 in the US.

Santana has the distinction of waiting the longest between his first charting single and first #1 hit. In 1969, “Tango” hit #56 in the US, and 30 years later this was #1.

The trend of aging rockers calling in hot young artists to give them contemporary appeal became known in the music press as “The Carlos Santana Effect,” thanks to his Supernatural success.

Marcus Raboy directed the music video. He also did the video for the Supernatural track “Maria Maria.”

Looking back on the song in 2020, Thomas told Songfacts: “I believe the best part of the whole process is that Carlos and I have become so close that we communicate just about every day. Always sending silly messages or song ideas or pics from our day. He’s been a great mentor but an even greater friend.”

Thomas found out this had been released as a single when he was standing on a street corner in Manhattan. A convertible full of girls pulled up with the song blasting on the car radio. He knew it was really big when he went to Los Angeles a short time later and encountered Jason Newsted of Metallica coming out of an elevator. Thomas told CBC Radio: “He came out of an elevator and was like, ‘Hey Rob’ – and I’d never met him – ‘Hey Rob, man, love that Carlos song.’ And I was like, ‘Alright, this has gone from New York hot girls to Metallica. There’s something happening here.”

LYRICS

Man, it's a hot one
Like seven inches from the midday sun
Well, I hear you whispering in the words, to melt everyone
But you stay so cool
My muñequita, my Spanish Harlem, Mona Lisa
You're my reason for reason
The step in my groove

And if you said this life ain't good enough
I would give my world to lift you up
I could change my life to better suit your mood
Because you're so smooth

And it's just like the ocean under the moon
Oh, it's the same as the emotion that I get from you
You got the kind of lovin' that can be so smooth, yeah
Give me your heart, make it real or else forget about it

But I'll tell you one thing
If you would leave it would be a crying shame
In every breath and every word
I hear your name calling me out
Out from the barrio
You hear my rhythm on your radio
You feel the turning of the world, so soft and slow
It's turning you round and round

And if you said this life ain't good enough
I would give my world to lift you up
I could change my life to better suit your mood
Because you're so smooth

And it's just like the ocean under the moon
Oh, it's the same as the emotion that I get from you
You got the kind of lovin' that can be so smooth, yeah
Give me your heart, make it real or else forget about it

And it's just like the ocean under the moon
Oh, it's the same as the emotion that I get from you
You got the kind of lovin' that can be so smooth, yeah
Give me your heart, make it real or else forget about it

Or else forget about it
Or else forget about it
Let's not forget about it
Give me your heart, make it real
Let's not forget about it
Let's not forget about it
Let's not forget about it
Let's not forget about it
Let's not forget about it

Courtesy of Songfacts

Song Lyric Sunday – Say It With Flowers

It’s all about the flowers for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday, hosted by Jim Adams. The prompts are Blossoms, Cherry and Flowers. I have decided to share two songs today. One is an old favorite from the 60s which has proven to be timeless. I think most people know Build Me Up Buttercup by The Foundations, regardless of their age. The video I have selected is from the hilarious movie Something About Mary which features the song. Unfortunately there are very few song facts about this one but it’s upbeat lyrics and rhythm tell it’s story of its popularity.

This was written by Mike D’Abo and Tony Macaulay. D’Abo was lead singer of Manfred Mann, and Macaulay was a successful songwriter who also wrote The Foundations hit “Baby Now That I’ve Found You” as well as songs by The Hollies, Andy Williams and The New Seekers.

David Essex, who was unknown at the time but went on to success with “Rock On,” was offered this song, but he turned it down as he didn’t like the title.

This was featured in the 1998 film There’s Something About Mary>>

This was featured in the 2001 pilot episode of the spy drama Alias, “Truth Be Told,” when Sydney Bristow’s (Jennifer Garner) ill-fated boyfriend sings it on the campus lawn before he proposes to her.

it has also been featured in a Geico commercial.

Courtesy of Songfacts

LYRICS

Why do you build me up (build me up) buttercup, baby
Just to let me down (let me down) and mess me around?
And then worst of all (worst of all) you never call, baby
When you say you will (say you will) but I love you still
I need you (I need you) more than anyone, darlin'
You know that I have from the start
So build me up (build me up) buttercup, don't break my heart

"I'll be over at ten," you told me time and again
But you're late, I wait around and then (bah dah dah)
I went to the door, I can't take any more
It's not you, you let me down again

(Hey, hey, hey) baby, baby, try to find
(Hey, hey, hey) a little time and I'll make you mine
(Hey, hey, hey) I'll be home
I'll be beside the phone waiting for you
Ooh ooh ooh, ooh ooh ooh 

Why do you build me up (build me up) buttercup, baby
Just to let me down (let me down) and mess me around?
And then worst of all (worst of all) you never call, baby
When you say you will (say you will) but I love you still
I need you (I need you) more than anyone, darlin'
You know that I have from the start
So build me up (build me up) buttercup, don't break my heart

You were my toy but I could be the boy you adore
If you'd just let me know (bah dah dah)
Although you're untrue, I'm attracted to you all the more
Why do I need you so?

(Hey, hey, hey) baby, baby, try to find
(Hey, hey, hey) a little time and I'll make you mine
(Hey, hey, hey) I'll be home
I'll be beside the phone waiting for you
Ooh ooh ooh, ooh ooh ooh 

Why do you build me up (build me up) buttercup, baby
Just to let me down (let me down) and mess me around?
And then worst of all (worst of all) you never call, baby
When you say you will (say you will) but I love you still
I need you (I need you) more than anyone, darlin'
You know that I have from the start
So build me up (build me up) buttercup, don't break my heart

I, I, I need you more than anyone, baby
You know that I have from the start
So build me up (build me up) buttercup

Writer/s: Tony Macauley, Mike D'Abo 
Publisher: Warner Chappell Music, Inc., Universal Music Publishing Group
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

My second choice today is Supermarket Flowers by Ed Sheehan. It’s a beautiful song he wrote after his grandmother passed away.

Ed Sheeran penned this aching, raw song as a tribute to his beloved grandmother Anne on the day she died. Speaking to British newspaper The Sun about writing the heartfelt tune he said, “That was the day my gran passed away. I was at my home. It’s just a knee-jerk reaction. You can be really upset and dwell on something or you can put all the good memories in one song.”

It was Anne who inspired both Ed and his brother Matthew, a classical composer, to pursue a career in music. Ed celebrates here the impact she had on him. “I just wanted to make a tribute to my gran,” the singer explained. “She was the musical one in my family. Hopefully I will pass that on to my kids.” 

Sheeran explained the song title: “My gran passed away and we were clearing out her hospital room and the supermarket flowers from the windowsill and having that moment,” he told Nova FM.

This is not the first time that Sheeran has honored his Irish grandparents in song. The x track “Afire Love” was written about Anne’s husband Bill, who died in 2013. Also the track “Nancy Mulligan,” on the deluxe version of Divide, tells the story of how the Irish couple fell in love despite their Catholic-Protestant divide.

Speaking to Apple Music, Sheeran said, “My grandfather just turned to me [at the funeral], he was like, you have to put that out, that has to go on the record. It’s such a good memory, that’s why it’s ended up on there.” >>

According to a chart published by Co-op Funeralcare in 2019, this was the sixth most popular funeral song in the UK. In case you’re wondering, Frank Sinatra’s “My Way” topped the list.

LYRICS

I took the supermarket flowers from the windowsill
I threw the day old tea from the cup
Packed up the photo album Matthew had made
Memories of a life that's been loved
Took the get well soon cards and stuffed animals
Poured the old ginger beer down the sink
Dad always told me, "don't you cry when you're down"
But mum, there's a tear every time that I blink

Oh I'm in pieces, it's tearing me up, but I know
A heart that's broke is a heart that's been loved

So I'll sing Hallelujah
You were an angel in the shape of my mum
When I fell down you'd be there holding me up
Spread your wings as you go
And when God takes you back we'll say Hallelujah
You're home

I fluffed the pillows, made the beds, stacked the chairs up
Folded your nightgowns neatly in a case
John says he'd drive then put his hand on my cheek
And wiped a tear from the side of my face

I hope that I see the world as you did cause I know
A life with love is a life that's been lived

So I'll sing Hallelujah
You were an angel in the shape of my mum
When I fell down you'd be there holding me up
Spread your wings as you go
And when God takes you back we'll say Hallelujah
You're home

Hallelujah
You were an angel in the shape of my mum
You got to see the person that I have become
Spread your wing
And I know that when God took you back he said Hallelujah
You're home

Writer/s: Edward Christopher Sheeran, Benjamin Joseph Levin, John McDaid 
Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd., Universal Music Publishing Group, Spirit Music Group
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Courtesy of Songfacts

Song Lyric Sunday – Forever and Always

What fun prompts Jim Adams, host of Song Lyric Sunday, has given us this week! With so many to choose from I had to control myself and not share three or four. I was also tempted to include one I know I had picked previously. I thought better of it and went searching for something I hadn’t heard before and came upon with this delightful love song by Shania Twain. The video is wonderful and even has Willie Nelson on stage with her. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

Forever and for Always” is a song co-written and recorded by Canadian country music singer Shania Twain and it was the third country single from her fourth studio album Up! (2002). The song was written by Robert John “Mutt” Lange and Twain. The single was released in the United States radio on April 7, 2003. The video debuted on Country Music Television on April 26, 2003. The song was also used for Febreze: Scentstories promotion, in which Twain took part. In 2006, “Forever and for Always” was certified gold for 500,000 digital downloads in the U.S. by the RIAA.

“Forever and for Always” was nominated for two Grammy Awards in 2004, Best Country Song and Best Female Country Vocal Performance; however, it lost in both categories. The song was also named Song of the Year at both the 2004 BMI Country Songwriter Awards and 2004 European BMI Awards.

Twain said there is something inspirational to her about people who start relationships when they are kids, and are still in love when they are older. Twain really enjoyed doing the video for the song, because she was able to realize that visually. She said it is one of her favorite songs.

“Forever and for Always” debuted on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart the week of April 12, 2003, at number 60.[ The single spent 26 weeks on the chart and climbed to a peak position of number four on September 6, 2003, where it remained for one week. “Forever and for Always” became Twain’s 14th top-10 single and 19th top-20 single.

On the adult contemporary chart, “Forever and for Always” debuted at number 30 the week of May 10, 2003. The single spent 77 weeks on the chart and slowly climbed to a peak position of number one on November 15, 2003, where it remained for six non-consecutive weeks. “Forever and for Always” became Twain’s third number one, sixth top-10 single and seventh consecutive top-20 single.

Twain’s fourth-most-successful single on the Billboard Hot 100 is “Forever and for Always”. It debuted on May 24, 2003, at number 75. It spent 23 weeks on the chart and peaked at number 20 on September 6, 2003, where it remained for one week. The single reached number 17 on the airplay chart. “Forever and for Always” became Twain’s fourth top-20 single and ninth top-40 single, as well as her last.

“Forever and for Always” proved to be successful internationally, becoming Twain’s fifth biggest single in the UK. It debuted on June 14, 2003, at its peak at number six. This made it her seventh consecutive, eighth overall, top-10 single. It remained on the entire chart for 10 weeks. In all, “Forever and for Always” hit the top-10 in six countries: Austria, Canada, Germany, Ireland, Romania, and the UK.

Courtesy of Wiki

LYRICS

In your arms, I can still feel the way you want me
When you hold me
I can still hear the words you whispered
When you told me
I can stay right here forever in your arms

And there ain't no way
I'm lettin' you go now
And there ain't no way
And there ain't no how
I'll never see that day

'Cause I'm keeping you forever and for always
We will be together all of our days
Wanna wake up every morning
To your sweet face, always

Ooh baby

In your heart, I can still hear a beat
For every time you kiss me
And when we're apart
I know how much you miss me
I can feel your love for me in your heart

And there ain't no way
I'm lettin' you go now
And there ain't no way
And there ain't no how
I'll never see that day

'Cause I'm keeping you forever and for always
We will be together all of our days
Wanna wake up every morning
To your sweet face, always

Wanna wake up every morning

In your eyes
(I can still see the look of the one)
I can still see the look
Of the one who really loves me
(I can still feel the way that you want)
The one who wouldn't put anything
Else in the world above me
(I can still see your love for me)
I can still see your love for me in your eyes
(I still see the love)

And there ain't no way
I'm lettin' you go now
And there ain't no way
And there ain't no how
I'll never see that day

'Cause I'm keeping you forever and for always
We will be together all of our days
Wanna wake up every morning
To your sweet face

I'm keeping you forever and for always
We will be together all of our days
Wanna wake up every morning
To your sweet face
I'm keeping you forever and for always

Always and forever
And in your arms

Written by written by Robert John "Mutt" Lange and Shania Twain

Lyrics courtesy of Lyrics Hall

Song Lyric Sunday – Jump Right In

Happy Sunday and welcome to Spring!

This week’s Song Lyric Sunday prompts, from our host Jim Adams, are Hop, Jump, Leap, Pounce and Spring. I came across this fun song from the Zac Brown Band. I hope you enjoy it along with the video.

Zac Brown penned this Caribbean-infused tune with his frequent songwriting partner Wyatt Durrette and pop singer-songwriter Jason Mraz. Durrette told the story of the song to Roughstock: “I was down in Anguilla, which is one of the islands way down there in the Caribbean, with our guitar player, Coy Bowles,” he recalled. “He and I went on a seven day disappearing act. It was just a beautiful place. It was a 16×4-mile island that has like 35 beaches on it or something like that. All of them are just the purest, white sand and the most blue water with basically nobody around. Every beach is your beach, pretty much. It’s just a gorgeous place. That’s where the first verse came from … the baby powder beach under my feet. It was a real-life experience.

“Then, right after that, I went to the Keys because the band was recording [their second album] You Get What You Give,” he continued. “We got there and hung out with Zac and the band. We were hanging out, and I told him about what I had so far. We started adding to it, and then left it alone, like usual. We start on them, and then when it runs out, we put it to the side and wait. We had written the melody to the first verse and pretty much all the first verse.

“I guess about a year later, Jason Mraz came down to Zac’s house,” Durrette added. “They were sitting around one night messing with the song, and when Jason heard the first verse, he was like, ‘Man … I just want to jump right in.’ Zac was like, ‘That works!’ They kind of put together the chorus, and then we kind of wrote the second verse together.”

Durrette penned the song’s bridge on a different occasion: “The bridge was something that I wrote completely to the side,” he noted to Roughstock. “I was having sushi with Jimmy, the fiddle player, and something came up about the music meeting the ocean. I was like wow, I need to write that, thinking for a different song … it just being an idea. I played it for Zac, and he was like, ‘That goes with that!’ It all kind of worked out. It took about two years to finally finish, but I guess that’s how we always work.”

Durrette explained the song’s meaning to Roughstock: “The idea behind the song is just another escapism song,” he said. “It’s a song about taking in everything around you and leaving everything else behind for a minute ….just enjoying the moment and not thinking about anything. Just jump on in, even if it’s cold. It will be worth it. That’s kind of the idea behind it. Just let everything else go and live in the moment, whatever that moment may be. Whether it’s listening to music or laying on a beach … that’s kind of the idea behind the song.”

Zac Brown Band Artistfacts

The country/folk band is based out of Atlanta, Georgia, where frontman Zac Brown was born in 1978.

They gained notoriety with the 2008 single “Chicken Fried,” an earlier song re-recorded for their major-label debut album The Foundation. It would be the first of many #1 country singles.

Before joining Zac Brown, multi-instrumentalist Clay Cook was a member of The Marshall Tucker Band. Before that, he was part of a duo called the Lo-Fi Masters with John Mayer. He also co-wrote songs for Mayer’s debut EP, Inside Wants Out, and his debut album, Room For Squares.

They won Best New Artist at the 2010 Grammy Awards, the third country act to win the award (behind Carrie Underwood and LeAnn Rimes).

One of the earliest members of the band was Zac Brown’s dog, Pete. Between high school and college (University of West Georgia), Zac went on a Southeast tour with a drummer and took Pete along.

The video for their 2013 single “Sweet Annie” contains snippets of footage from Coy Bowles’ wedding.

Zac Brown wed Jewelry designer Shelly in 2006 after being introduced by a friend. They had five children together: son Alexander and daughters Joni, Georgia, Lucy and Justice. The couple announced in October 2018 that they were separating after 12 years of marriage.

LYRICS


The Southern wind sings again an island lullaby

Baby powder beach under my feet has got me rolling
And the breeze through crackling leaves like a daytime campfire burning
And the ship is off to sea
And the wake it is a churning
As the Southern wind sings again an island lullaby

You can jump right in
Let the music pull you in
You can jump right in
Oh and lose yourself again
As the Southern wind sings again a island lullaby

There's a place the locals go and no one knows where to find it
And the river starts to flow inside the clouds of Misty Mountain
The water from this stone below becomes a blue-green fountain
As the Southern wind sings again an island lullaby

You can jump right in
Let the music pull you in
You can jump right in
Oh and lose yourself again
As the Southern wind sings again an island lullaby

You can find me where the music meets the ocean
If you get the notion, stop on by and play a while
Simple tune to get your love light glowing
Keep your heart wide open
Disappear just like the tide
Let it roll on by

And jump right in
Let the music pull you in
You can jump right in
Oh and lose yourself again
As the Southern wind sings again an island lullaby
The Southern wind sings again an island lullaby
Island lullaby



Courtesy of Songfacts

Song Lyric Sunday – Misery

This week’s prompts for Song Lyric Sunday, hosted by Jim Adams, are Anguish, Misery and Torment. We are undoubtedly going to be hearing a lot of songs about pain and sadness. Can’t wait! 😦

I have chosen Misery by Maroon 5. It’s a good song and the video tells the couples story of their breakup. Warning – her next boyfriend might want to watch this video before committing! I hope you enjoy it.

This is the first single from American pop rock band Maroon 5’s third studio album, Hands All Over. It was released on June 22, 2010. The song documents the decay of a relationship, familiar territory for the band. Frontman Adam Levine told MTV News: “‘Misery’ is about the desperation of wanting someone really badly in your life but having it be very difficult. Kind of what all the songs I write are about. I’m not treading on new ground, but I think a lot of people – including myself – deal with that all the time. Relationships are difficult, and it’s good therapy to write about them.”

Levine told MTV News about the Joseph Kahn-directed video. “The cool thing is, when Joseph wrote the treatment after reading a few sentences, I thought it was really amazing,” he said. “Because it kind of turns the whole idea of the sexual energy between two people – a guy and a girl, a music video, you’ve seen that a million times – that exists in this video, but it’s turning it on its ass and having the girl be the more domineering one who’s trying to kill me.”

The clip was filmed in Los Angeles with Levine’s girlfriend – Russian model Anne Vyalitsyna – playing the leading lady.The female lead’s attempts to kill her lover in the video results in plenty of action sequences. This meant that stuntmen were required to double up for the band members in some of the scenes. Levine admitted to MTV News: “I’ll tell you a little secret… the stuntmen were so great, but they probably weren’t too happy because they had to dress like us [for the video], which was hilarious, because we aren’t the most masculine dressers. This dude who was [keyboardist] Jesse [Carmichael]’s stunt double was, like, really buff, and he has Jesse’s little low-top Converse and skinny jeans on. The shoes were, like, falling off his massive ankles.”

Levine added: “I did a lot of stuff, a lot of stuff is me! But most of it wasn’t very dangerous. Although, by the end of the day, even not being hit by things is such a physical thing that I was really kind of beat up. I was like, ‘Man, even thinking I got my ass kicked feels like getting my ass kicked.”

The song received positive reviews from music critics. Bill Lamb from About.com, while reviewing the single, awarded it with the maximum of stars (5 out of 5), saying: “All of the usual elements of a Maroon 5 hit are here, from the perky pop-soul sound to lyrics of intense conflict in a relationship. However, this time the band takes it all a few steps forward into the category of pop perfection. Quite possibly a key reason for this step forward is the presence of the by now legendary Robert John ‘Mutt’ Lange in the producers chair. ‘Misery’ is instantly the best mainstream pop single of 2010 so far.”

Courtesy of Songfacts and Wiki

LYRICS

Oh yeah
Oh yeah
So scared of breaking it
That you won't let it bend
And I wrote two hundred letters
I will never send
Sometimes these cuts are so much
Deeper then they seem
You'd rather cover up
I'd rather let them bleed
So let me be
And I'll set you free

I am in misery
There ain't nobody
Who can comfort me
Why won't you answer me?
The silence is slowly killing me
Girl you really got me bad
You really got me bad
I'm gonna get you back
Gonna get you back

Your salty skin and how
It mixes in with mine
The way it feels to be
Completely intertwined
It's not that I didn't care
It's that I didn't know
It's not what I didn't feel,
It's what I didn't show
So let me be
And I'll set you free

I am in misery
There ain't nobody
Who can comfort me
Why won't you answer me?
Your silence is slowly killing me
Girl you really got me bad
You really got me bad
I'm gonna get you back
Gonna get you back

You say your faith is shaken
You may be mistaken
You keep me wide awake and
Waiting for the sun
I'm desperate and confused
So far away from you
I'm getting there
Don't care where I have to run

Why do you do what you do to me, yeah
Why won't you answer me, answer me, yeah
Why do you do what you do to me, yeah
Why won't you answer me, answer me, yeah

I am in misery
There ain't nobody
Who can comfort me
Why won't you answer me?
Your silence is slowly killing me
Girl you really got me bad
You really got me bad
I'm gonna get you back
Gonna get you back

Girl you really got me bad
You really got me bad
I'm gonna get you back
Gonna get you back

(Girl you really got me bad)
(You really got me bad)
(I'm gonna get you back)
(Gonna get you back)Writer/s: Adam Levine, Jesse Royal Carmichael, Michael Allen Madden, James B. Valentine, Sam John Farrar 
Publisher: Warner Chappell Music, Inc.,
Universal Music Publishing Group

Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

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Song Lyric Sunday – The Coffee Song

This week our host of Song Lyric Sunday, Jim Adams, has prompted us to find songs that include Cappuccino, Coffee, Espresso or Mocha in the title or within the lyrics. I must admit I found this a difficult prompt and struggled to find something that I liked 😕. Anyway I discovered this song by Cream called “The Coffee Song”. It was featured on their debut studio album, Fresh Cream. Although it was not featured on either the UK or USA original versions, a later Scandinavian release of the album finally included the song. I hope you like it.

Fresh Cream is the debut studio album by the British rock band Cream. The album was released in the UK on 9 December 1966, as the first LP on the Reaction Records label, owned by producer Robert Stigwood. The UK album was released in both mono and stereo versions, at the same time as the release of the single “I Feel Free”. The album peaked at No. 6 on the UK Albums Chart.]

The album was released in a slightly different form in January 1967 by Atco Records in the US, also in mono and stereo versions.

The mono versions were deleted not long after release and for many years only the stereo recordings were available. The UK mono album was reissued on CD for the first time in Japan, by Universal Music, in late 2013 as part of a deluxe SHM-CD and SHM-SACD sets (both editions also contain the UK stereo counterpart).

In January 2017, the album was again reissued, by Polydor, in a 4-CD box-set containing mono and stereo versions of the original UK and US release along with singles and B-sides.

Bass player Jack Bruce later said that the opening song “N.S.U.” was written for the band’s first rehearsal. “It was like an early punk song… the title meant “non-specific urethritis. It didn’t mean an NSU Quickly – which was one of those little 1960s mopeds. I used to say it was about a member of the band who had this venereal disease. I can’t tell you which one… except he played guitar.”

In 2012, the album was ranked number 102 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 Greatest Albums of all time (the highest-ranking album by Cream on the list). Uncut describes the songs as “all about playing in a band and relaxing, the joy of being young, and they walk it like they talk it, being jumping-off points for wonderful spur-of-the moment improvisations”. Writing for the BBC, Sid Smith notes that “blues, pop and rock magically starts to coalesce to create something brand new”. Stephen Thomas Erlwine of AllMusic believes the record to be “instrumental in the birth of heavy metal and the birth of jam rock”.

Original reissues in the U.S. on RSO/Polydor use the same track listing as the original UK edition given above in which “I Feel Free” is replaced with “Spoonful” on Side 1. Polydor’s original CD release from the 1980s combines the UK and US track lists but also includes “The Coffee Song” and “Wrapping Paper,” which were removed from subsequent CD releases starting in the 1990s.

An edition released only in Scandinavia was a 12-track release, It had the same ten tracks as the UK version plus added two tracks: “Wrapping Paper”, written by Jack Bruce and Pete Brown, and “The Coffee Song”, written by Tony Colton and Ray Smith. Both vinyl and cover were made in Germany and exported to the Swedish market only – the German original had the same 10 tracks as the UK. The group didn’t want “Coffee Song” to be issued at all, but a mono version was mixed and coupled with “Wrapping Paper” as a single. There were no plans at this stage to release it in stereo, so for the Swedish issue, a crude stereo mix was used. This was made during the sessions in early August 1966 for instructive purpose – the whole track as basic mono is mixed far right and a solo guitar overdub far left. Never intended for release, this mix was soon lost and for later stereo issues a new one was made.

The front cover and record no. (623 031) are the same as the German issue, but three different back covers exist. The first listed the correct 12 tracks, the second listed 10 tracks, and a third where the 12 track listing has been “glued” over the 10 track listing.

Courtesy of Wiki

LYRICS

There's a full time reservation
Made in a bar at the railway station,
And there's a story, a kind of fable,
On a card at the corner table.
On it is a message; been there some time.
It starts of, "The coffee tasted so fine"
It says, "One day, this may find you,
These few words may remind you.
We sat here together just to pass time;
You said how the coffee tasted so fine."
It goes on to say, "I love you
If you should find this I must hear from you."
It gives a number but the name has faded away.
All that is left are just the words, "Maybe someday"
That's the story and the fable;
Never leave alone from a corner table.
Doo doo doo doo, doo doo doo doo.
Doo doo-doo doo doo-doo doo doo doo doo.

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Raymond Barry Smith/Tony Colton
Coffee Song (August 1966 London)
lyrics © Bluewater Music Corp.

Song Lyric Sunday – Blowin’ in the Wind

Good Sunday morning! This week’s Song Lyric Sunday, hosted by our friend Jim Adams, is prompting us to find a song with Breeze, Cloud, Sky or Wind In the title or lyrics. I was torn between two great songs by favorite artists but in the end I went with the one with the best lyrics. ‘Blowin’ in the Wind’ by Bob Dylan. To me this song is timeless and it is as relevant today as it was in the 60s. I hope you enjoy it.

Dylan claims that he wrote this song in about 10 minutes one afternoon. He put words to the melody of an old slave song called “No More Auction Block,” which he might have learned from Carter family records. In the evening, Dylan took the song to the nightclub Gerde’s Folk City in Greenwich Village, where he was due to play a set. Before playing it, he announced, “This here ain’t no protest song or anything like that, ’cause I don’t write no protest songs.” During this first performance, Dylan couldn’t read some of his own handwriting and made up some of the lyrics as he went along.

The Dylan version of this song was never a hit – it was a cover by Peter, Paul & Mary that made #2 in the US in February 1963, introducing many people to the music of Bob Dylan, who was an obscure folk singer at the time.

Dylan gained National exposure when he performed this song with Peter, Paul & Mary at the 1963 Newport Folk Festival. Magazines like Time, Playboy, and The New Yorker ran stories on Dylan after the performance.
Dylan wrote this in 1962, but did not release it until his second album a year later. It was common for Dylan to play songs for a while before he recorded them, which gave him control over when they could be covered. Once a song is recorded, anyone can cover it if they pay the mechanical licensing fees.

A November 1963 Newsweek article fueled rumors that Dylan stole this song from a New Jersey high school student. The article stated:

There is even a rumor circulating that Dylan did not write ‘Blowin’ In The Wind,’ that it was written by a Millburn (NJ) High student named Lorre Wyatt, who sold it to the singer. Dylan says he did write the song and Wyatt denies authorship, but several Millburn students claim they heard the song from Wyatt before Dylan ever sang it.

In 1962, Dylan let a folk magazine called Sing Out! publish the lyrics. The student, Lorre Wyatt from Millburn, New Jersey, got the magazine and played it for the band he was in, claiming he wrote it. They performed it for their school a few months before Dylan released the song, which led everyone in the school to believe Dylan had stolen the song from Wyatt.

The rumor became a bigger kerfuffle thanks to some circumstantial evidence linking Dylan to the student:

1) Dylan visited an ailing Woody Guthrie, who was living at Greystone Hospital in New Jersey at the same time Wyatt was a volunteer there, known for singing songs to the patients. (Guthrie spent his Sundays as outpatient, where a couple from East Orange looked after him in their apartment. This is where he and Dylan got together.)

2) Dylan and Wyatt were both known to hang out in Greenwich Village around 1962.

3) Dylan didn’t publish the song until July 30, 1962, which was three weeks after he recorded it. This was unusual in that musicians like to publish their works first to keep them from getting stolen, and it set up a scenario where Dylan heard the song, recorded it, found out it wasn’t published and then published it himself. The truth was that Dylan didn’t always tend to the legal details at a time when he was cranking out song after song.

4) When Mike Royko of the Chicago Daily News contacted Wyatt in 1974 and asked if he wrote the song, Wyatt didn’t deny it and refused comment, which supported his claim that he had sold the song for $1,000 and was forbidden from talking about it as part of the terms.

Later that year, Wyatt came clean, but in the New Times, which had a much smaller circulation than the Chicago Daily News. Wyatt explained how things got out of control, as by trying to downplay his role in the song, it fueled the rumors and led his classmates and teachers to believe they had the inside scoop. Said Wyatt: “I’d begun to make Pinocchio look like he had a pug nose.” For a fictional portrayal of a similar story, check out the movie The Squid And The Whale, where a high school student passes off “Hey You” as his own.

This song was a major influence on Sam Cooke and prompted a change in his music. Cooke felt this could easily have been about racial injustice and thought it had special relevance to the black community. He performed a soulful version on the ABC show Shindig and released a live version on his album Sam Cooke At The Copa. In December 1964, just as Cooke began writing more political music, he was shot and killed by a motel manager who claimed she acted in self-defense. Released shortly after his death, Cooke’s song “A Change Is Gonna Come” may be the best example of Dylan’s influence on him.

Stevie Wonder became the first black artist to take a Dylan song into the US Top 10 when his version of “Blowin’ In The Wind” went to #9 in 1966.
Peter Yarrow of Peter, Paul and Mary said in the Radio Times, October 13-19, 2007: “His (Bob Dylan’s) writing put Peter, Paul and Mary on another level. We heard his demos and Albert (Grossman, both Dylan and the trio’s manager) thought the big song was ‘Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right,’ but we went crazy over ‘Blowin’ In The Wind.’ We instinctively knew the song carried the moment of its own time. He was rising so fast over anybody else, in the level of poetry and expression, to a shatteringly brilliant level.”

Speaking of Dylan in a Songfacts interview, Yarrow added, “He was just a fountain of brilliance of poetry. And he was as a person just a normal human being, like everybody else.”
This may be the most-covered of Bob Dylan’s songs. Some of the many artists who performed it include Dolly Parton, Nickel Creek and Neil Young. When The Staple Singers recorded it in 1963, they became the first black group to cover a Bob Dylan song.

A rendition by the saxophone player Stan Getz went to #110 in 1964, and the gospel group The Edwin Hawkins Singers took it to #109 in 1969, following their hit “Oh Happy Day.”
Bob Dylan performed this in the BBC play Madhouse On Castle Street, which aired January 13, 1963. Dylan performed songs throughout the play, closing with “Blowin’ In The Wind.” >>
Peter, Paul & Mary performed this song at the March on Washington, which took place August 28, 1963. This was a seminal event in American history, epitomized by Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous “I Have A Dream” speech. Mary Travers described having an epiphany during the performance. “Looking out at those 250,000 people, I truly believed at that moment it was possible for human beings to join together to make a positive social change,” she said.

Bob Dylan also performed at the event, appearing with Joan Baez before Peter, Paul & Mary went on.

Dylan performed this song sporadically from 1962-1965, and didn’t play it at all on his 1966 tour, which was cut short by a motorcycle accident. Over the next eight years, he made just a few select live appearances, and performed “Blowin’ In The Wind” at only one of them: George Harrison’s “Concert For Bangladesh” in 1971. This was the first charity concert on this scale, with proceeds helping Bangladeshi refugees in India. It was a good cause, so Dylan acquiesced and played some of his most popular songs during the set, including “Blowin’ In The Wind” and “Mr. Tambourine Man.” When Dylan hit the road in 1975, he included “Blowin’ In The Wind” in his setlist, and he played it at many of his subsequent shows throughout his career, making it one of his most-performed songs at his shows.

This was used in the UK by the British consumer-owned Cooperative Group in a series of adverts. It was the first time one of Dylan’s songs has been used in a UK advert, though his music has previously been used to advertise iTunes and Victoria’s Secret lingerie in America. Some of Dylan’s fans claimed the singer was selling out, but his record company argued that the co-op’s adherence to high ethical guidelines regarding fair trade and the environment influenced his decision.
This song is played in the movie Forrest Gump by the character Jenny (Robin Wright). She’s in a strip club, performing as “Bobbi Dylan.” She’s sitting on a stool naked playing guitar and singing, and when the drunk men start to get fresh, Forrest tries to save her. Joan Baez’s version is featured on the official soundtrack.

The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan made a huge impact on The Beatles. “We just played it, just wore it out,” said George Harrison. “The content of the song lyrics and just the attitude – it was incredibly original and wonderful.”

The song prompted a homily by Pope John Paul II. Playing for the Pontiff at the World Eucharistic Congress in Bologna in 1997, Dylan was greeted by him with the reflection: “You say the answer is blowing in the wind, my friend. So it is: but it is not the wind that blows things away. It is the wind that is the breath and life of the Holy Spirit, the voice that calls and says, ‘Come!'”

The Pope even answered a question Dylan posed in the song: “You’ve asked me: ‘How many roads must a man walk down before he becomes a man?’ I answer you: One. There is only one road for man and it is Christ, who said ‘I am the life.'”

Dylan took some heat for appropriating lines from old poems on some of his tracks from his 2006 Modern Times album, including they lyrics “Where wisdom grows up in strife” from his song “When the Deal Goes Down,” which borrows from a passage from a mid-1800’s poem by Henry Timrod, who wrote, “There is a wisdom that grows in strife.”

These accusations resurfaced in Dylan’s 2012 Rolling Stone interview, where he invoked “Blowin’ In The Wind” as evidence that he has dealt with these questions for quite a while. Said Dylan, “Newsweek magazine lit the fuse way back when. Newsweek printed that some kid from New Jersey wrote ‘Blowin’ In The Wind’ and it wasn’t me at all. And when that didn’t fly, people accused me of stealing the melody from a 16th century Protestant hymn. And when that didn’t work, they said they made a mistake and it was really an old Negro spiritual. So what’s so different? It’s gone on for so long I might not be able to live without it now. F–k em. I’ll see them all in their graves.”

This song was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1999.
In 1997 a review in the biomedical journal Nature Medicine was published under the title “Nitric Oxide And Inflammation: The Answer Is Blowing In The Wind.” It turned out that this was part of a bet among Swedish scientists who were trying to embed Dylan lyrics into their articles.

Courtesy of Songfacts

LYRICS

How many roads must a man walk down
Before you call him a man?
How many seas must a white dove sail
Before she sleeps in the sand?
Yes, 'n' how many times must the cannon balls fly
Before they're forever banned?
The answer, my friend, is blowin' in the wind
The answer is blowin' in the wind

Yes, 'n' how many years can a mountain exist
Before it's washed to the sea?
Yes, 'n' how many years can some people exist
Before they're allowed to be free?
Yes, 'n' how many times can a man turn his head
And pretend that he just doesn't see?
The answer, my friend, is blowin' in the wind
The answer is blowin' in the wind

Yes, 'n' how many times must a man look up
Before he can see the sky?
Yes, 'n' how many ears must one man have
Before he can hear people cry?
Yes, 'n' how many deaths will it take till he knows
That too many people have died?
The answer, my friend, is blowin' in the wind
The answer is blowin' in the wind

Writer/s: Bob Dylan 
Publisher: Universal Music Publishing Group
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – Long Time Gone

Good prompts this week from Jim Adams at Song Lyric Sunday. He gave us Long, Tall, Small and Short. There are some obvious ones but I decided to dig a little deeper and came up with this great song and video from The Chicks (formerly known as the Dixie Chicks – good for them for changing that name!). They are from Texas and as I lived in Dallas for around 14 years, I watched them become very popular. The first time I saw them they were performing downtown Dallas at one of the many outdoor festivals. They were very talented singers and musicians so it was no surprise they made the big time.

This song itself does not have much of a story behind the writing of it but it’s a good one! The Chicks have a better story and that’s probably why I like them so much. The following article was on NPR.org in June of 2020.

The country trio Dixie Chicks have changed the group’s name to The Chicks in an apparent distancing from a name associated with the Confederate-era South. 

The switch was not made with any kind of official announcement or explanation but simply with the release of a new song, “March March,” on Thursday. Its lyrics and video reference current and past public protests involving racial justice, police brutality, gun violence, climate change and LGBTQ rights. The video compares current themes to historical fights in the U.S. for women’s right to vote and the struggles for Black and LGBTQ civil rights.

The video also scrolls the names of dozens of Black victims of police brutality and those who died in apparently racially motivated confrontations, including George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, Eric Garner and Amadou Diallo. The list of names that quickly flash by goes on for more than a full minute.

For years, the Dixie Chicks — Natalie Maines, Emily Strayer and Martie Maguire — served as a cautionary tale to country musicians in terms of avoiding politics. In 2003, shortly before the U.S. invaded Iraq, Maines told an audience in London that they did not support the military action and that she was “ashamed” that then-U.S. President George W. Bush was, like the band, from Texas.

The musicians experienced immediate career fallout. Despite having been massively popular with country audiences before those statements, the group was dropped from country radio stations. Some country fans also staged anti-Dixie Chick demonstrations, which included destroying copies of the band’s CDs.

The damage was lasting. Three years later, broadcast networks including NBC and the CW refused to run ads for a documentary film about the group — called Shut Up & Sing. And the band never really recovered its relationship with the mainstream country industry.

A spokesperson for the group’s label, Columbia Records (part of Sony Music Entertainment), told NPR on Thursday that The Chicks had no comment on the name change. But the switch comes two weeks after another country group, the former Lady Antebellum, changed its name to Lady A. That change was accompanied by a social media statement in which Lady A said that the country’s recent attempts to reckon with racial justice issues had made the band members’ eyes open wide to inequality.

Courtesy of NPR.org

The song, “Long Time Gone”, is about the sorry state of Contemporary Country music. The lyric, “They sound tired but they don’t sound Haggard, they have money but they don’t have Cash,” is a reference to Country legends Merle Haggard and Johnny Cash. The song implies that today’s Country has no soul.

This was written and originally recorded by Darrell Scott on his 2000 album Real Time. Scott is a prominent session guitarist and songwriter as well as a performer.

The song was covered by The Chicks on their 2002 album Home, despite having been written from a presumably male point of view. Released in May 2002 as the lead single from Home, it reached a peak of number 2 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart[1] and number 7 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. Their version won a Grammy Award for Best Country Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group.

Courtesy of Songfacts and Wiki

Lyrics

Daddy sits on the front porch swinging,
Looking out on a vacant field.
Used to be filled with burley t'bacca.
Now he knows it never will.

My brother found work in Indiana,
Sister's a nurse at the old folks home.
Mama's still cooking too much for supper,
And me, I've been a long time gone.

Been a long time gone,
No, I ain't hoed a row since I don't know when.
Long time gone, and it ain't coming back again.

Delia plays that ol' church piano,
Sittin' out on her daddy's farm.
She always thought that we'd be together,
Lord, I never meant to do her harm.

Said she could hear me singin' in the choir,
Me, I heard another song.
I caught wind and hit the road runnin',
And Lord, I've been a long time gone.

Been a long time gone,
Lord, I ain't had a prayer since I don't know when.
Long time gone, and it ain't comin' back again.

Now me, I went to Nashville,
Tryin' to beat the big deal.
Playin' down on Broadway,
Gettin' there the hard way.
Living from a tip jar,
Sleeping in my car.
Hocking my guitar,
Yeah, I'm gonna be a star.

Now, me and Delia singing every Sunday,
Watching the children and the garden grow.
We listen to the radio to hear what's cookin',
But the music ain't got no soul.

Now they sound tired but they don't sound Haggard,
They've got money but they don't have Cash.
They got Junior but they don't have Hank.
I think, I think, I think, the rest is,
A long time gone,

No, I ain't hit the roof since I don't know when.
Long time gone, and it ain't coming back.

I said a long time gone,
No, I ain't honked the horn since I don't know when.
Long time gone, and it ain't coming back again.

I said a long time, long time, long time gone.
Well, it's been a long time.

Long time, long time, long time gone,
Oh, it's been a long time gone.

Long time, long time, long time gone.
Yeah, yeah.

Writer/s: Darrell Scott 
Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, BMG Rights Management
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – Thinking Out Loud

Choosing from the prompts for this week’s prompts for Song Lyric Sunday, provided by Jim Adams, I had fun deciding which one I would pick. The prompts are Brain, Mind or Think. I found many, crossing several genres and decided on Ed Sheeran’s “Thinking Out Loud”. It’s a lovely, romantic song. I hope you enjoy it!

This soulful song finds Sheeran tipping the hat to his key teenage influence, Van Morrison. “No one’s really channeled Van Morrison for a long time,” he pointed out to Q magazine. “Everyone always channels, Michael Jackson and the Beatles and Bob Dylan, and I feel like Van Morrison is a key figure in the music that I make.”

Sheeran wrote this love song about his girlfriend at the time, Athina Andrelos, who worked for English celebrity chef Jamie Oliver. The pair split up in early 2015 after dating for about a year.

Ed Sheeran wrote this with the Bristol singer-songwriter Amy Wadge, whom he previously worked with on his 2010 EP, Songs I Wrote With Amy. Another of their collaborations, “Even My Dad Does Sometimes,” can be found on the deluxe version of the album X.

Sheeran revealed to The Mirror that their song-writing session was held as a favor to his childhood friend to help her deal with financial issues. “[Amy] was going through financial troubles about a year ago,” he said. “She drove to my house – my album was nearly done – and she asked if I could put a song from when I was 17 on the deluxe album, so she could get a little bit of money and pay the mortgage and bills and stuff.”

“While she was there, we wrote ‘Thinking Out Loud’,” he added. “Now she never has to worry about money again.”

The romantic ballad was the last song that Sheeran wrote for X. He penned it in his kitchen

The song’s music video was directed by Emil Nava, who also filmed the clip for “Sing.” The visual features Sheeran and his partner Brittany Cherry ballroom dancing and was shot all at once in 16 mm film. “I wanted the video to be a little different, so I opted for ballroom dancing,” he explained when the video was released in October 2014. “I had lessons for five hours a day when I was on my US tour last month.”

Brittany Cherry was a contestant on Season 10 of the American TV dance competition So You Think You Can Dance. She is formally trained in ballroom, ballet, jazz, Latin and contemporary dance.

This topped the UK singles charts in its 19th week, after an exhilarating performance of the tune by Sheeran on the X Factor live show. In doing so the song broke the record for the slowest continual climb to #1, overtaking the 16-week ascent of Jennifer Rush’s “The Power Of Love” and Celine Dion’s “Think Twice.”

The song broke the UK record for the most streams in a chart week when it was streamed 1.72 million streams in the week ending November 22, 2014.

The record was broken a month later by Mark Ronson’s “Uptown Funk,” which achieved 2.34 million streams in the pre-Christmas week.
Ed Sheeran wanted to look good for the video, so he lost 35 pounds, mainly by giving up beer.

Sheeran performed this at the Grammy Awards in 2015 backed by John Mayer on guitar, Questlove on drums, and Herbie Hancock on keyboards (Sheeran later joined Electric Light Orchestra on “Mr. Blue Sky”). X was nominated for Album Of The Year, but lost to Morning Phase by Beck.
This spent eight weeks at #2 on the Hot 100 behind Mark Ronson’s “Uptown Funk” without ever reaching the peak position. Missy Elliott’s “Work It” and Foreigner’s “Waiting For A Girl Like You” hold the joint record for the most weeks peaked at the runner-up spot: ten apiece.
With electronic music ruling the airwaves, this was one of the few hit songs of its time with a guitar solo (played by Chris Leonard), which is near the end of the song in place of a bridge. Running 4:41, it was also very long by 2014 hit song standards, although this extra time makes the song more appealing as a first dance wedding number

.The song made history by becoming the first to spend a full year inside the UK Top 40. Pharrell Williams’ “Happy” was the previous record holder, having spent 49 consecutive weeks on the Top 40.

This picked up the award for Song of the Year at the Grammys in 2016. Stevie Wonder presented the award, opening the envelope and reading the card in braille before saying, “I told my daughter Iesha this was a great song when I first heard it, and it has won tonight.”

When Sheeran collected the award with Amy Wadge, he said, “We wrote it on a couch in my house after having dinner. Quite odd.” He also thanked his parents for flying to the ceremony each of the previous three years, only to see Ed come away empty-handed. When Sheeran turned the mic over to Wadge, however, producers didn’t let her get a word in before rolling a Glenn Frey tribute.

The song also won for Best Solo Pop Performance, but lost Record of the Year to “Uptown Funk.”

The heirs of Ed Townsend, Marvin Gaye’s co-writer and co-producer on “Let’s Get It On,” sued Ed Sheeran for plagiarism claiming he lifted key parts of the 1973 soul classic.

The lawsuit claims, according to Reuters: “The Defendants copied the ‘heart’ of ‘Let’s’ and repeated it continuously throughout ‘Thinking.’ The melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic compositions of ‘Thinking’ are substantially and/or strikingly similar to the drum composition of ‘Let’s.'”

The suit came two months after musicians Martin Harrington and Thomas Leonard sued Sheeran for allegedly stealing pieces of “Photograph.”

A federal judge dismissed the suit as Townsend’s heirs failed to serve the complaint before the deadline of January 20, 2017.

18 months later a company called Structured Asset Sales, which owns one third of the copyright to the song, added itself to the fray. The company originally tried to join the Townsend lawsuit but their request was turned down. As a result, Structured Asset Sales filed a suit on June 28, 2018 citing similarities in the “melody, harmony, and rhythm compositions” of the songs. The suit asks for $100 million in damages, as well as costs and attorney’s fees

This topped Spotify’s 2017 list of the most popular wedding songs in America based on the streaming platform’s user-made wedding playlists. Runner up was “Marry You” by Bruno Mars.

Courtesy of Songfacts

Lyrics

When your legs don't work like they used to before
And I can't sweep you off of your feet
Will your mouth still remember the taste of my love
Will your eyes still smile from your cheeks

And darling I will be loving you 'til we're 70
And baby my heart could still fall as hard at 23
And I'm thinking 'bout how people fall in love in mysterious ways
Maybe just the touch of a hand
Oh me I fall in love with you every single day
And I just wanna tell you I am

So honey now
Take me into your loving arms
Kiss me under the light of a thousand stars
Place your head on my beating heart
I'm thinking out loud
Maybe we found love right where we are

When my hair's all but gone and my memory fades
And the crowds don't remember my name
When my hands don't play the strings the same way, mm
I know you will still love me the same

'Cause honey your soul can never grow old, it's evergreen
Baby your smile's forever in my mind and memory

I'm thinking 'bout how people fall in love in mysterious ways
Maybe it's all part of a plan
I'll just keep on making the same mistakes
Hoping that you'll understand

But baby now
Take me into your loving arms
Kiss me under the light of a thousand stars
Place your head on my beating heart
I'm thinking out loud
That maybe we found love right where we are, oh

(Ah la la, la la la, la la la, la la la la)

So baby now
Take me into your loving arms
Kiss me under the light of a thousand stars
Oh darling, place your head on my beating heart
I'm thinking out loud
That maybe we found love right where we are

Oh maybe we found love right where we are
And we found love right where we are

Writer/s: Amy Wadge, Edward Christop
her Sheeran 
Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC,
Royalty Network
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind
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