Category: Song Lyric Sunday

Song Lyric Sunday – Before He Cheats

Break Up Songs is the prompt from Janis of the momshiediaries blog, for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday. I went with Carrie Underwood’s “Before He Cheats”. It is a fair warning song with great lyrics of what she will do if he cheats on her. Better look out man, she means business!

Enjoy the song and video and I hope have a great Sunday.

The Song

This song is about revenge. Underwood sings about going into a parking lot and vandalizing her cheating boyfriend’s 4×4 truck with a baseball bat. She finds solace knowing that the next time he cheats, it won’t be on her.

When Underwood sings about her ex putting on “bathroom Polo,” she’s referring to vending machines found in the men’s rooms of certain US drinking establishments that dispense low-grade cologne. The guys who buy these fragrances often believe it will help them attract a mate in the bar, although many females are actually repelled by the scent.

This song won the trophy for Single Of The Year at the 2007 Country Music Association Awards. In addition, Carrie Underwood also won the award for Female Vocalist Of The Year.

In February 2008 “Before He Cheats” became the first country song to achieve RIAA certification as a Double-Platinum Digital Single, recognizing 2 million purchased downloads.

Underwood performed this at the 2008 Grammy awards with the cast of Stomp, which acted as backup dancers and percussionists. The set was designed to look like cars they were beating up.

Some Hearts became the best selling solo female Country debut in RIAA history. It also was the highest selling Country album in the US in both 2006 and 2007.

The Roman White directed-music video shows Underwood destroying her cheating lover’s truck. Her unfaithful partner is played by Atlanta-based model Tabb Shoup.

Speaking with CMT, Underwood admitted she almost passed on this song out of fear of a fan backlash. “I remember at that time – because that was right after Idol – we [were] on the road, and then I get this song,” she recalled. “I [thought], ‘People are going to hate me for singing this song.’ They’re gonna be like, ‘Oh my gosh, we can’t listen to her album. She’s bad, and I can’t let my children listen to this.’ Finally I was just like, ‘You know what? I like this song. I would turn this song up on the radio, so I’m just gonna go for it.'”

The song holds the record for the longest ascent to the top ten of the Billboard Hot 100. It took 38 weeks to climb to the top tier in 2006-07.

Thanks to this song, Underwood carved out a niche for songs that take down badly behaved boyfriends. Some of her later tunes to incorporate this theme include “Cowboy Casanova,” “Two Black Cadillacs” and “Dirty Laundry.”

Courtesy of Songfacts

The Lyrics

Right now, he's probably slow dancing
With a bleached-blond tramp
And she's probably getting frisky
Right now, he's probably buying
Her some fruity little drink
'Cause she can't shoot whiskey

Right now, he's probably up behind her
With a pool-stick
Showing her how to shoot a combo
And he don't know

I dug my key into the side
Of his pretty little souped-up four-wheel drive
Carved my name into his leather seats
I took a Louisville slugger to both head lights
I slashed a hole in all four tires
Maybe next time he'll think before he cheats

Right now, she's probably up singing some
White-trash version of Shania karaoke
Right now, she's probably saying "I'm drunk"
And he's a-thinking that he's gonna get lucky

Right now, he's probably
Dabbing on three dollars
Worth of that bathroom Polo
Oh, and he don't know

That I dug my key into the side
Of his pretty little souped-up four-wheel drive
Carved my name into his leather seats
I took a Louisville slugger to both head lights
I slashed a hole in all four tires
Maybe next time he'll think before he cheats

I might have saved a little trouble for the next girl
'Cause the next time that he cheats
Oh, you know it won't be on me!
No, not on me

'Cause I dug my key into the side
Of his pretty little souped-up four-wheel drive
Carved my name into his leather seats
I took a Louisville slugger to both head lights
I slashed a hole in all four tires
Maybe next time he'll think before he cheats

Oh, maybe next time he'll think before he cheats
Oh, before he cheats

Oh

Writer/s: Chris Tompkins, Josh Kear 
Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Round Hill Music Big Loud Songs
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – Dog and Butterfly


We have been prompted with Insects and Bugs for Song Lyric Sunday this week, courtesy of Amy from aimusic. My song choice for this prompt is Dog and Butterfly by the band Heart. This song was also an inspiration for my similarly named poem, The Dog and the Butterfly. You can read that here if you are interested.

I have used this song before but it was several years ago and we have some new participants in our group so I think it should be acceptable.

Dog & Butterfly” is a song recorded by the rock band Heart. It is the title track to the band’s fourth studio album Dog & Butterfly and was released as the album’s second single. The song is a more subdued effort from the band, differing from past hard rock-oriented hits, as Ann and Nancy Wilson pulled from their folk music influences. The song charted moderately in the US in 1979, peaking at #34 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Ann has said she was inspired when she looked out a window and saw a dog relentlessly chasing a butterfly. She saw the song as an inspiration when things get tough to “keep going after it.”

Although it enjoyed only moderate chart success, the song has remained a setlist staple for Heart consistently through the years.

Lyrics

There I was with the old man
Stranded again so off I'd ran
A young world crashing around me
No possibilities of getting what I need
He looked at me and smiled
Said no, no, no, no, no child

See the dog and butterfly
Up in the air he likes to fly
Dog and butterfly
Below she had to try
She roll back down to the warm soft ground, laughing
She don't know why, she don't know why
Dog and butterfly

Well I stumbled upon your secret place
Safe in the trees you had tears on your face
Wrestling with your desires frozen strangers
Stealing your fires, the message hit my mind
Only words that I could find

See the dog and butterfly
Up in the air he like to fly
Dog and butterfly below she had to try
She roll back down to the warm soft ground
Laughing to the sky, up to the sky
Dog and butterfly

We're getting older the world's getting colder
For the life of me I don't know the reason why
Maybe it's livin' making us give in
Hearts rolling in taken back on the tide
We're balanced together ocean upon the sky

Another night in this strange town
Moonlight holding me light as down
Voice of confusion inside of me
Just begging to go back where I'm free
Feels like I'm through
Then the old man's words are true

See the dog and butterfly
Up in the air he like to fly
Dog and butterfly, below she had to try
She roll back down to the warm soft ground
With a little tear in her eye
She had to try, she had to try
Dog and butterfly, yeah

Up in the air he like to fly
The dog and butterfly, below she had to try
She roll back down to the warm soft ground, laughing
She don't know why
But she had to try, she had to try
Dog and butterfly

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Ann Wilson / Nancy Lamoureaux Wilson / Susan Ennis
Dog And Butterfly lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

Song Lyric Sunday – Bob Dylan

One of the most influential American singer, songwriter, poets of my generation is Bob Dylan. I have chosen him as my artist for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday post, hosted by Jim Adams, who asked us to concentrate on honoring American artists in honor of Independence Day July 4th.

My song choice, Positively 4th Street, is a personal favorite. I used this song back in July of 2018 when SLS was hosted by Helen Vahdati. She had prompted us with the word ‘Street’. I figured enough time had passed and I could share it again.

Only Dylan could answer what this song is actually about. There are many theories shared online as to who or what is the subject of the song. Some say it was his departure from acoustic to electric guitar which was not regarded as a good decision at that time. Others allude to a business association gone wrong. There is also discussion about which 4th Street he is referring to. Is it New York’s Greenwich Village or is it the one in San Francisco? It was definitely 4th Street in New York! Crazy theories in my opinion. I have always regarded it as the ultimate break-up song with unforgettable last lines that have always stuck with me.

Whatever you may think, it is an iconic song that will always put me in a place and time as music usually does.

The Artist

Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman; May 24, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter, author and visual artist. Often regarded as one of the greatest songwriters of all time, Dylan has been a major figure in popular culture during a career spanning nearly 60 years. Much of his most celebrated work dates from the 1960s, when songs such as “Blowin’ in the Wind” (1963) and “The Times They Are a-Changin'” (1964) became anthems for the civil rights and anti-warmovements. His lyrics during this period incorporated a range of political, social, philosophical, and literary influences, defying pop music conventions and appealing to the burgeoning counter culture.

Following his self-titled debut album in 1962, which mainly comprised traditional folk songs, Dylan made his breakthrough as a songwriter with the release of The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan the following year. The album features “Blowin’ in the Wind” and the thematically complex “A Hard Rain’s a-Gonna Fall”. Many of his songs adapted the tunes and phraseology of older folk songs. He went on to release the politically charged The Times They Are a-Changin’ and the more lyrically abstract and introspective Another Side of Bob Dylan in 1964. In 1965 and 1966, Dylan drew controversy when he adopted electrically amplifiedrock instrumentation, and in the space of 15 months recorded three of the most important and influential rock albums of the 1960s: Bringing It All Back Home (1965), Highway 61 Revisited (1965) and Blonde on Blonde (1966). Commenting on the six-minute single “Like a Rolling Stone” (1965), Rolling Stone wrote: “No other pop song has so thoroughly challenged and transformed the commercial laws and artistic conventions of its time, for all time”.

In July 1966, a motorcycle accident led to Dylan’s withdrawal from touring. During this period, he recorded a large body of songs with members of the Band, who had previously backed him on tour. These recordings were released as the collaborative album The Basement Tapes in 1975. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, Dylan explored country music and rural themes in John Wesley Harding(1967), Nashville Skyline (1969), and New Morning (1970). In 1975, he released Blood on the Tracks, which many saw as a return to form. In the late 1970s, he became a Christian and released a series of albums of contemporary gospel music before returning to his more familiar rock-based idiom in the early 1980s. Dylan’s 1997 album Time Out of Mind marked the beginning of a renaissance for his career. He has released five critically acclaimed albums of original material since then, the most recent being Rough and Rowdy Ways (2020). He also recorded a series of three albums in the 2010s comprising versions of traditional American standards, especially songs recorded by Frank Sinatra. Backed by a changing lineup of musicians, he has toured steadily since the late 1980s on what has been dubbed the Never Ending Tour.

Since 1994, Dylan has published eight books of drawings and paintings, and his work has been exhibited in major art galleries. He has sold more than 125 million records, making him one of the best-selling musicians of all time. He has received numerous awards, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom, ten Grammy Awards, a Golden Globe Award and an Academy Award. Dylan has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame and the Songwriters Hall of Fame. The Pulitzer Prize Board in 2008 awarded him a special citation for “his profound impact on popular music and American culture, marked by lyrical compositions of extraordinary poetic power”. In 2016, Dylan was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature “for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition”.

The Song – Positively 4th Street

The song, written and performed by Bob Dylan, was first recorded in New York City on July 29, 1965.  It was released as a single by Columbia Records on September 7, 1965, reaching No. 1 on Canada’s RPM chart, No. 7 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, and No. 8 on the UK Singles Chart. Rolling Stone magazine ranked the song as No. 206 in their 500 Greatest Songs of All Time list.

The song was released between Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde on Blonde, as the follow-up to Dylan’s hit single”Like a Rolling Stone”, but was not included on either album.[7] The song’s title does not appear anywhere in the lyrics and there has been much debate over the years as to the significance or which individual the song concerns.

An unreleased promo spot of the song can be found on the No Direction Home DVD special features.

Courtesy of Wiki

The Lyrics

You've got a lotta nerve to say you are my friend
When I was down you just stood there grinnin'
You've got a lotta nerve to say you got a helping hand to lend
You just want to be on the side that's winnin'

You say I let you down, ya know its not like that
If you're so hurt, why then don't you show it?
You say you've lost your faith, but that's not where its at
You have no faith to lose, and ya know it

I know the reason, that you talked behind my back
I used to be among the crowd you're in with
Do you take me for such a fool, to think I'd make contact
With the one who tries to hide what he don't know to begin with?

You see me on the street, you always act surprised
You say "how are you?", "good luck", but ya don't mean it
When you know as well as me, you'd rather see me paralyzed
Why don't you just come out once and scream it

No, I do not feel that good when I see the heartbreaks you embrace
If I was a master thief perhaps I'd rob them
And tho I know you're dissatisfied with your position and your place
Don't you understand, its not my problem?

I wish that for just one time you could stand inside my shoes
And just for that one moment I could be you
Yes, I wish that for just one time you could stand inside my shoes
You'd know what a drag it is to see you

Writer/s: Bob Dylan 
Publisher: Universal Music Publishing Group
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – Breakfast at Tiffany’s

Our friend Paula of Light Motifs II has given us this week’s prompts for Song Lyric Sunday, hosted by Jim Adams. Her suggestions are Breakfast, Brunch, Dinner, Lunch, Snack and Supper.

I have chosen Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Deep Blue Something. A cute song and video that I remember from the 90s. but the band was really a one hit wonder. The good thing about Song Lyric Sunday is that when you start researching these songs you sometimes find a really interesting backstory. In this case it was Truman Capote’s connection to Rock Music!.

Songfacts

Breakfast at Tiffany’s” is a 1995 song recorded by American alternative rock band Deep Blue Something. Originally appearing on the album 11th Song, it was later re-recorded and released on their album Home. It was the band’s only hit,  peaking at number five on the US Billboard Hot 100. Outside the United States, “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” topped the UK Singles Chart and peaked within the top ten on the charts of Australia, Flanders, Canada, Denmark, Germany, Iceland, the Republic of Ireland and Sweden.

Follow-up singles failed to match the success of “Breakfast at Tiffany’s”, hence the reason for the band’s classification as a one-hit wonder.

Deep Blue Something lead singer Todd Pipes was inspired to write this song after seeing Audrey Hepburn in the film Roman Holiday, but he thought “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” would be a better title.
Breakfast at Tiffany’s is a 1961 movie based on a book by Truman Capote. It starred Audrey Hepburn as Holly Golightly, a high-priced escort looking for a rich man to marry. The movie made the song “Moon River” famous.

The song is a humorous and optimistic look at a failing relationship. One partner focuses on how different the two people are and how they aren’t going to last as a couple:

You say that we’ve got nothing in common
No common ground to start from
And we’re falling apart

The other partner, however, focuses on one small detail they have in common which is that they both like the movie Breakfast at Tiffany’s. The speaker clings to this one detail and repeats it five times as the chorus in the song:

And I said, “What about Breakfast at Tiffany’s”
She said, “I think I remember the film”
and as I recall, I think, we both kinda liked it
And I said, “Well, that’s one thing we got”

Deep Blue Something was formed by four college students from the University of North Texas. This was their only hit, and they did not release another album until Byzantium in 1998.
Todd Pipes recalled to Q magazine November 2008 that promoting this song got to be pretty tiresome. He explained: “As the song had Breakfast in the title, radio stations thought it would be genius to have us on at breakfast time. We’d be up till 3 a.m. and they’d wonder why we were pissed off playing at 6am.”

Truman Capote (1924 – 1984) was an American author, many of whose short stories, novels, plays and non-fiction are recognized literary classics. He was born in Louisiana and his early works, including The Glass Harp, are about the South. He then moved to New York, where he wrote scripts for plays and films plus further novels including his 1958 novella Breakfast at Tiffany’s. In the early 1960s, Capote’s career flagged until In Cold Blood (1965), his journalistic work about the murder of a Kansas farm family in their home, made Capote a celebrity.

Capote was 5 feet 3 inches tall and openly homosexual. His distinctive, high-pitched voice and odd vocal mannerisms were bought to life in Philip Seymour Hoffman’s Oscar-winning portrayal of him in the 2005 movie, Capote.
Apart from this song, Capote has several other connections to rock music. They include:

1) In 1972 Capote was commissioned by Rolling Stone to cover the Rolling Stones’ tour of North America. And though he set out on the tour and began taking copious notes, he quickly fell out with Mick Jagger and refused to write the article. “Mick Jagger is about as sexy as a pissing toad,” he later cattily averred.

2) Capote posthumously appeared on the sleeve of The Smiths’ 1985 single, The Boy with the Thorn in His Side. English fashion and portrait photographer Cecil Beaton took the picture in 1949.

3) Capote was name-checked along with a number of other famous people in the Red Hot Chili Peppers’ 1991 track, “Mellowship Slinky In B Major.”

Courtes of Wiki and Songfacts

Lyrics

You'll say we've got nothing in common
No common ground to start from
And we're falling apart
You say the world has come between us
Our lives have come between us
Still I know you just don't care

And I said, "What about Breakfast at Tiffany's?"
She said, "I think I remember the film
And as I recall, I think we both kinda liked it"
And I said, "Well, that's the one thing we've got"

I see you, the only one who knew me
But now your eyes see through me
I guess I was wrong
So what now? It's plain to see we're over
And I hate when things are over
When so much is left undone

And I said, "What about Breakfast at Tiffany's?"
She said, "I think I remember the film
And as I recall, I think we both kinda liked it"
And I said, "Well, that's the one thing we've got"

You say that we've got nothing in common
No common ground to start from
And we're falling apart
You say the world has come between us
Our lives have come between us
Still I know you just don't care

And I said, "What about Breakfast at Tiffany's?"
She said, "I think I remember the film
And as I recall, I think we both kinda liked it"
And I said, "Well, that's the one thing we've got"

Ooh, and I said, "What about Breakfast at Tiffany's?"
She said, "I think I remember the film
And as I recall, I think we both kinda liked it"
And I said, "Well, that's the one thing we've got"

And I said, "What about Breakfast at Tiffany's?"
She said, "I think I remember the film
And as I recall, I think we both kinda liked it"
And I said, "Well, that's the one thing we've got"

Writer/s: Todd David Pipes 
Publisher: Warner Chappell Music, Inc.
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – Killer Queen

Song Lyric Sunday prompts this week are Brutal, Cruel, Frenzy, Savage and Violent suggested by Melanie. I had a tough time with this one and apart from ‘Don’t Be Cruel’ by Elvis Presley I was stuck. Then I remembered an old favorite ‘Killer Queen’ by Queen and thought it fit the category perfectly, but without the violence. I hope you enjoy Freddie Mercury at his best in this video.

Song Facts

In the New Musical Express November 2, 1974, the song’s writer Freddie Mercury elucidated on this song: “It’s about a high class call girl. I’m trying to say that classy people can be whores as well. That’s what the song is about, though I’d prefer people to put their interpretation upon it – to read into it what they like.”

Regarding the line, “‘Let them eat cake’ she says, just like Marie Antoinette,” according to legend, Marie Antoinette (the Queen of France) said “Let them eat cake” after hearing how the peasants had no bread to eat. It’s more likely that the phrase was uttered by a French philosopher, not Antoinette. 

The Marie Antoinette quote has gone down in history as justification for the French Revolution. It demonstrates how out of touch with the common folk the ruling class had become. According to legend, when informed that there was no bread for the people to eat, she replied, oblivious, “then let them eat cake!” It is said, that enraged by this incredibly ignorant response, the people revolted. In the song, it is used to demonstrate at what level this high priced prostitute sells her wares. 

The first single from Queen’s third album, Sheer Heart Attack, “Killer Queen” was their first song to chart outside their native UK, where “Seven Seas of Rhye,” from their previous album Queen II, reached #10. Their breakthrough to superstardom came with their next album, A Night At The Opera, which has the epic “Bohemian Rhapsody” on the tracklist.

The Sheer Heart Attack album cover was shot by Mick Rock, who did the famous cover of their previous album, Queen II, showing the four band members in darkness with their faces illuminated. Freddie Mercury typically drove the visual direction of the band, but it was drummer Roger Taylor who came up with the concept for the Sheer Heart Attack cover. “He said, ‘I want us

to look like we’re thrown up from a shipwreck on some distant shore,’ so that’s what I shot,” Mick Rock told Songfacts. “Of course, they were soaking wet and there was a lot of spraying going on.”

In the New Musical Express November 2, 1974, the song’s writer Freddie Mercury elucidated on this song: “It’s about a high class call girl. I’m trying to say that classy people can be whores as well. That’s what the song is about, though I’d prefer people to put their interpretation upon it – to read into it what they like.”

Regarding the line, “‘Let them eat cake’ she says, just like Marie Antoinette,” according to legend, Marie Antoinette (the Queen of France) said “Let them eat cake” after hearing how the peasants had no bread to eat. It’s more likely that the phrase was uttered by a French philosopher, not Antoinette. 

The Marie Antoinette quote has gone down in history as justification for the French Revolution. It demonstrates how out of touch with the common folk the ruling class had become. According to legend, when informed that there was no bread for the people to eat, she replied, oblivious, “then let them eat cake!” It is said, that enraged by this incredibly ignorant response, the people revolted. In the song, it is used to demonstrate at what level this high priced prostitute sells her wares. 

The first single from Queen’s third album, Sheer Heart Attack, “Killer Queen” was their first song to chart outside their native UK, where “Seven Seas of Rhye,” from their previous album Queen II, reached #10. Their breakthrough to superstardom came with their next album, A Night At The Opera, which has the epic “Bohemian Rhapsody” on the tracklist.

The Sheer Heart Attack album cover was shot by Mick Rock, who did the famous cover of their previous album, Queen II, showing the four band members in darkness with their faces illuminated. Freddie Mercury typically drove the visual direction of the band, but it was drummer Roger Taylor who came up with the concept for the Sheer Heart Attack cover. “He said, ‘I want us to look like we’re thrown up from a shipwreck on some distant shore,’ so that’s what I shot,” Mick Rock told Songfacts. “Of course, they were soaking wet and there was a lot of spraying going on.”

Courtesy of Songfacts

Lyrics

She keeps her Moet et Chandon
In her pretty cabinet
"Let them eat cake", she says
Just like Marie Antoinette
A built-in remedy
For Kruschev and Kennedy
At anytime an invitation
You can't decline

Caviar and cigarettes
Well versed in etiquette
Extraordinarily nice

She's a Killer Queen
Gunpowder, gelatine
Dynamite with a laser beam
Guaranteed to blow your mind
Anytime

Recommended at the price
Insatiable an appetite
Wanna try?

To avoid complications
She never kept the same address
In conversation
She spoke just like a baroness
Met a man from China
Went down to Geisha Minah
Then again incidentally
If you're that way inclined

Perfume came naturally from Paris (naturally)
For cars she couldn't care less
Fastidious and precise

She's a Killer Queen
Gunpowder, gelatine
Dynamite with a laser beam
Guaranteed to blow your mind
Anytime

Drop of a hat she's as willing as
Playful as a pussy cat
Then momentarily out of action
Temporarily out of gas
To absolutely drive you wild, wild
She's all out to get you

She's a Killer Queen
Gunpowder, gelatine
Dynamite with a laser beam
Guaranteed to blow your mind
Anytime

Recommended at the price
Insatiable an appetite
Wanna try?
You wanna try

Writer/s: Freddie Mercury 
Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, DistroKid
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind


Song Lyric Sunday – Hey Joe

Welcome to another Song Lyric Sunday where we, the participants in the challenge, share different songs after being prompted by our host Jim Adams. This week he has given us “Greet, Hey and Howdy”. We are to find a song with one of these prompt words in either the title or lyrics. Please join us if you want to play along. Create your own post with song choice, video and lyrics and link it to he SLS site so we can all see it and you can read everyone’s posts.

I have gone with the first song that jumped into my head and that is Hey Joe by the great Jimi Hendrix. I was fortunate to have seen him perform at The Upper Cut Club in London’s East End in 1966. Hendrix lived for a time in London in the 60s and it was here in the dressing room of the club that he began writing Purple Haze.

The story goes that, while tuning up backstage on Boxing Day 1966, Hendrix’s manager and producer, Chas Chandler, overheard Hendrix play the Purple Haze riff. He ordered him to write the rest of it and Hendrix wrote the lyrics of the infamous song in the dressing room there that very day.

Purple Haze was then recorded at De Lane Lea studios in Soho two weeks later.

I love the way the poster for the upcoming events at the club spelled his name as Jimmy rather than Jimi.

The second video is a more up front and personal one of Hendrix playing acoustic guitar. Just wanted to share something else.

Background

“Hey Joe” was written by a singer named Billy Roberts, who was part of the Greenwich Village folk scene in the early ’60s. The song is structured as a conversation between two men, with “Joe” explaining to the other that he caught his woman cheating and plans to kill her. They talk again, and Joe explains that he did indeed shoot her, and is headed to Mexico.

Billy Roberts copyrighted this song in 1962, but never released it (he issued just one album, Thoughts Of California in 1975). In 1966, several artists covered the song, including a Los Angeles band called The Leaves (their lead singer was bassist Jim Pons, who joined The Turtles just before they recorded their Happy Together album), whose version was a minor hit, reaching #31 in the US. Arthur Lee’s group Love also recorded it that year, as did The Byrds, whose singer David Crosby had been performing the song since 1965. These were all uptempo renditions.

The slow version that inspired Hendrix to record this came from a folk singer named Tim Rose, who played it in a slow arrangement on his 1967 debut album and issued it as a single late in 1966. Rose was a popular singer/songwriter for a short time in the Greenwich Village scene, but quickly faded into obscurity before a small comeback in the ’90s. He died in 2002 at age 62.

This is the song that started it all for Hendrix. After being discharged from the US Army in 1962, he worked as a backing musician for The Isley Brothers and Little Richard, and in 1966 performed under the name Jimmy James in the group Jimmy James and the Blue Flames. Hendrix introduced “Hey Joe” to the band and added it to their setlist. During a show at the Greenwich Village club Cafe Wha?, Chas Chandler of The Animals was in the audience, and he knew instantly that Hendrix was the man to record the song.

Chandler convinced Hendrix to join him in London, and he became Jimi’s producer and manager. Teaming Hendrix with Noel Redding and Mitch Mitchell, Chandler had the group – known as The Jimi Hendrix Experience – record “Hey Joe,” and released it as a single in the UK in December 1966. It climbed to #6 in February 1967, as Hendrix developed a reputation as an electrifying performer and wildly innovative guitarist.

America was a tougher nut to crack – when the song was released there in April, it went nowhere.

The song incorporates many elements of blues music, including a F-C-G-D-A chord progression and a story about infidelity and murder. This led many to believe it was a much older (possibly traditional) song, but it was an original composition.

Hendrix played this live for the first time at the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival. It was the first time the group performed in America.

This was released in Britain with the flip side “Stone Free,” which was the first song Hendrix wrote for The Jimi Hendrix Experience.

The song was released in the UK on the Polydor label in a one-single deal. Hendrix then signed to the Track label, which was set up by Kit Lambert, producer for The Who.

Dick Rowe of Decca Records turned down Hendrix for a deal, unimpressed with both “Hey Joe” and “Stone Free.” Rowe also turned away the Beatles four years earlier.

This is one of the few Hendrix tracks with female backing vocals. They were performed by a popular trio called the Breakaways (Jean Hawker, Margot Newman, and Vicki Brown), who were brought in by producer Chas Chandler.

The Hendrix version omits the first verse, where Joe buys the gun:

Hey Joe, where you goin’ with that money in your hand?
Chasin’ my woman, she run off with another man
Goin downtown, buy me a .44


In the original (and most versions pre-Hendrix), Joe also kills his wife’s lover when he catches them in bed together.

This was the last song performed at Woodstock in 1969. The festival was scheduled to end at midnight on Sunday, August 17 (the third day), but it ran long and Hendrix didn’t go on until Monday around 9 a.m. There weren’t many attendees left, but Hendrix delivered a legendary performance.

While Jimi’s version is by far the most famous, “Hey Joe” has been recorded by over 1000 artists. In America, three versions charted: 

The Leaves (#31, 1966)
Cher (#94, 1967)
Wilson Pickett (#59, 1969)

Hendrix is the only artist to chart with the song in the UK, although a completely different song called “Hey Joe” was a #1 hit there for Frankie Laine in 1963.

Lyrics

Hey Joe, where you goin' with that gun in your hand
Hey Joe, I said where you goin' with that gun in your hand
I'm goin' down to shoot my old lady
You know I caught her messin' 'round with another man
Yeah, I'm goin' down to shoot my old lady
You know I caught her messin' 'round with another man

Huh! And that ain't cool
Hey hoe, I heard you shot your mama down
You shot her down now
Hey Joe, I heard you shot your lady down
You shot her down in the ground yeah!
Yeah!

Yes, I did, I shot her
You know I caught her messin' round messin' round town
Huh, yes I did I shot her
You know I caught my old lady messin' 'round town
And I gave her the gun
And I shot her
Alright
Shoot her one more time again baby!
Yeah!
Oh dig it
Oh alright

Hey Joe
Where you gonna run to now where you gonna go
Hey Joe, I said
Where you gonna run to now where you gonna go
I'm goin' way down south
Way down to mexico way
Alright
I'm goin' way down South
Way down where I can be free

Ain't no one gonna find me
Ain't no hangman gonna
He ain't gonna put a rope around me
You better believe it right now
I gotta go now
Hey, Joe
You better run on down
Goodbye everybody
Hey, hey Joe

Playing Acoustic Guitar

Song Lyric Sunday – Borrowed Time

Something Old, New, Borrowed and Blue are the prompts this week for Song Lyric Sunday, hosted by our friend Jim Adams. There are some great songs out there to choose from with these prompts in the title or lyrics and I think we will see a wide variety of picks.

I have chosen Borrowed Time by John Lennon. I have to admit it is not my favorite song from him, but there is an interesting backstory to the song, and the video gives us a chance to see some special Lennon moments. (Do your best to block out Yoko Ono! 😦)

“Borrowed Time” is a song from John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s last album, Milk and Honey. While the single failed to chart in the United States, it charted at number 32 in the UK Singles Chart. The B-side features Ono’s song “Your Hands” from the same album.

The song was inspired during Lennon’s 1980 sailing holiday from Newport Rhode Island to Bermuda. During the journey, Lennon’s yacht encountered a prolonged and severe storm, resulting in most of the crew eventually succumbing to profound fatigue and seasickness. Lennon (free of seasickness) was eventually forced to take the yacht’s wheel alone for many hours. Lennon found this terrifying but invigorating, with the effect of both renewing his confidence and making him contemplate the fragility of life (Lennon claimed his recovery from heroin addiction some years earlier had rendered him immune to seasickness). Once he arrived in Bermuda, Lennon heard the line ‘living on borrowed time’ from Bunny Wailer’s “Hallelujah Time” and was inspired by his recent experience to write the lyrics around that theme. Wailer was also the inspiration for the reggae feel of the music. Lennon commented that living on borrowed time was exactly what he was doing but then said, “come to think of it, it’s what we’re all doing, even though most of us don’t like to face it.”

A demo of the song with acoustic guitar and double-tracked vocals was recorded in Bermuda on 22 June 1980 and was released on the John Lennon Anthology in 1998.

An attempt was made to formally record the song during the Double Fantasy sessions on 6 August 1980. It was the second song attempted during the sessions, with Lennon telling the band to think of the Isley Brother’s “Twist and Shout” and “Spanish Twist”. As he was somewhat frustrated that the band could not quite catch the reggae feel, Lennon decided to set the song aside. A horn overdub was planned, but never recorded.

Courtesy of Wiki

Sadly, this proved prophetic, as Lennon was killed in December 1980. (from Fred Seaman’s The Last Days of John Lennon)

According to Yoko Ono, Lennon considered his time precious, and was aware that his life could be cut short. 

This is a very lighthearted song, but the title became sobering when John was killed. “Now when we think about the title, it’s just kind of chilling in a way, that he was very aware that it was a borrowed time,” Yoko said in a 1998 interview with Uncut.

Courtesy of Songfacts

LYRICS

When I was younger
Living confusion and deep despair
When I was younger
Living illusion of freedom and power 

When I was younger
Full of ideas and broken dreams (my friend)
When I was younger ah hah
Everything simple but not so clear 

Living on borrowed time
Without a thought for tomorrow
Living on borrowed time
Without a thought for tomorrow 

Now I am older
The more that I see the less that I know for sure
Now I am older
The future is brighter and now is the hour 

Living on borrowed time
Without a thought for tomorrow
Living on borrowed time
Without a thought for tomorrow 

Good to be older
Would not exchange a single day or a year
Good to be older
Less complications everything clear 

Living on borrowed time
Without a thought for tomorrow
Living on borrowed time
Without a thought for tomorrow

Writer/s: JOHN LENNON, JOHN WINSTON LENNON 
Publisher: Downtown Music Publishing
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – Walking In Memphis

Welcome to another Song Lyric Sunday. This week we are prompted to find songs about towns, counties, cities, states and countries and my journey took me to some far flung places. We all have an affinity to where we are born and I found many songs about my home town of London. Although I was tempted, I decided to keep on searching and found myself hopping all over the world. In the end I opted for a song that I have always enjoyed listening to and we don’t hear it very often – “Walking in Memphis” by Marc Cohn.I like the story behind this song and hope you like it too.

Cohn wrote this song after traveling to Memphis to check out Graceland, which is Elvis Presley’s mansion and a kitschy tourist destination. He made sure to see an Al Green sermon when he was there, but it was a trip out of Memphis along Highway 61 where the meaty part of his journey took place. In the desolate Delta, he saw a sign that said “Hollywood,” which turned out to be the Hollywood Cafe, which is a small diner/music joint in Tunica County, Mississippi. This is where Cohn smelled the catfish and encountered a black woman in her 70s named Muriel who was at the piano. After watching Muriel play a variety of spirituals and Hoagy Carmichael songs for about 90 minutes, he spoke with her when she took a break.

Cohn’s mother died when he was just 2 years old, and he lost his father at age 12. He spent a lot of time reconciling his childhood, which often comes out in his songs. Speaking with Muriel, he got maybe the best therapy of his life. Cohn described this conversation in his 1992 interview with Q magazine, saying: “She was real curious, she seemed to have some kind of intuition about me, and I ended up telling her about my family, my parents, how I was a musician looking for a record deal, the whole thing. Then, it must have been about two in the morning, she asks me up to sing with her and we do about an hour, me and this lady I’d never met before, hardly a song I knew so she’s yelling the words at me. Then at the end, as the applause is rising up, she leans over and whispers in my ear, she’s whispering, “You’ve got to let go of your mother, child, she didn’t mean to die, she’s where she’s got to be and you’re where you have to be, child, it’s time to move on.”

The Hollywood Cafe is still there – you drive right past it to go to several of the casinos now located in Tunica. Muriel and Cohn kept in touch, and she attended his wedding in New York. Cohn saw her again when he took another trip down south and played her some of his new songs, but Muriel died in 1990. >>

This was the first single for Cohn, who was discovered by Carly Simon in the mid-’80s when he was with a 14-piece band called The Supreme Court. Atlantic Records signed him in 1989, but the first attempts to record his debut album with Tracy Chapman’s producer David Kerschenbaum failed. Ten months later, he tried again, producing the set himself with help from the little-known Ben Wisch, who had helped him with his demos. Finally released in 1991 when Cohn was 31 years old, his self-titled debut album was a huge hit, thanks to the massive success of “Walking In Memphis.” Cohn won the 1991 Grammy for Best New Artist award, beating out both Boyz II Men and Seal. Cohn never matched the chart success of this song, but like his musical heroes Van Morrison, Joni Mitchell and Jackson Browne, he remained a critical and artistic success as a songwriter and performer.

Cohn has explained that this song is a journey to be baptized in the world of blues music. He said it is about “Spiritual Awakening.”

The lyrics, “Walking with my feet ten feet off of Beale” refers to Beale Street, an actual street in Memphis. Riley B. King became known as the “Beale Street Blues Boy” shortly after he first arrived in Memphis. Later, the nickname was shortened to B.B., and the rest is history.

Cohn wrote this song after traveling to Memphis to check out Graceland, which is Elvis Presley’s mansion and a kitschy tourist destination. He made sure to see an Al Green sermon when he was there, but it was a trip out of Memphis along Highway 61 where the meaty part of his journey took place. In the desolate Delta, he saw a sign that said “Hollywood,” which turned out to be the Hollywood Cafe, which is a small diner/music joint in Tunica County, Mississippi. This is where Cohn smelled the catfish and encountered a black woman in her 70s named Muriel who was at the piano. After watching Muriel play a variety of spirituals and Hoagy Carmichael songs for about 90 minutes, he spoke with her when she took a break.

Cohn’s mother died when he was just 2 years old, and he lost his father at age 12. He spent a lot of time reconciling his childhood, which often comes out in his songs. Speaking with Muriel, he got maybe the best therapy of his life. Cohn described this conversation in his 1992 interview with Q magazine, saying: “She was real curious, she seemed to have some kind of intuition about me, and I ended up telling her about my family, my parents, how I was a musician looking for a record deal, the whole thing. Then, it must have been about two in the morning, she asks me up to sing with her and we do about an hour, me and this lady I’d never met before, hardly a song I knew so she’s yelling the words at me. Then at the end, as the applause is rising up, she leans over and whispers in my ear, she’s whispering, You’ve got to let go of your mother, child, she didn’t mean to die, she’s where she’s got to be and you’re where you have to be, child, it’s time to move on.”

The Hollywood Cafe is still there – you drive right past it to go to several of the casinos now located in Tunica. Muriel and Cohn kept in touch, and she attended his wedding in New York. Cohn saw her again when he took another trip down south and played her some of his new songs, but Muriel died in 1990. >>

This was the first single for Cohn, who was discovered by Carly Simon in the mid-’80s when he was with a 14-piece band called The Supreme Court. Atlantic Records signed him in 1989, but the first attempts to record his debut album with Tracy Chapman’s producer David Kerschenbaum failed. Ten months later, he tried again, producing the set himself with help from the little-known Ben Wisch, who had helped him with his demos. Finally released in 1991 when Cohn was 31 years old, his self-titled debut album was a huge hit, thanks to the massive success of “Walking In Memphis.” Cohn won the 1991 Grammy for Best New Artist award, beating out both Boyz II Men and Seal. Cohn never matched the chart success of this song, but like his musical heroes Van Morrison, Joni Mitchell and Jackson Browne, he remained a critical and artistic success as a songwriter and performer.

Cohn has explained that this song is a journey to be baptized in the world of blues music. He said it is about “Spiritual Awakening.”

The lyrics, “Walking with my feet ten feet off of Beale” refers to Beale Street, an actual street in Memphis. Riley B. King became known as the “Beale Street Blues Boy” shortly after he first arrived in Memphis. Later, the nickname was shortened to B.B., and the rest is history.

LYRICS

Put on my blue suede shoes
And I boarded the plane
Touched down in the land of the Delta Blues
In the middle of the pouring rain
W.C. Handy, won't you look down over me
Yeah, I got a first class ticket
But I'm as blue as a boy can be

Then I'm walking in Memphis
Walking with my feet ten feet off of Beale
Walking in Memphis
But do I really feel the way I feel?

Saw the ghost of Elvis
On Union Avenue
Followed him up to the gates of Graceland
Then I watched him walk right through
Now security they did not see him
They just hovered 'round his tomb
But there's a pretty little thing
Waiting for the King
Down in the Jungle Room

When I was walking in Memphis
I was walking with my feet ten feet off of Beale
Walking in Memphis
But do I really feel the way I feel?

They've got catfish on the table
They've got gospel in the air
And Reverend Green be glad to see you
When you haven't got a prayer
But, boy, you've got a prayer in Memphis

Now Muriel plays piano
Every Friday at the Hollywood
And they brought me down to see her
And they asked me if I would
Do a little number
And I sang with all my might
She said
"Tell me are you a Christian child?"
And I said "Ma'am, I am tonight"

Walking in Memphis
(Walking in Memphis)
Was walking with my feet ten feet off of Beale
Walking in Memphis
(Walking in Memphis)
But do I really feel the way I feel?

Walking in Memphis
(Walking in Memphis)
I was walking with my feet ten feet off of Beale
Walking in Memphis
(Walking in Memphis)
But do I really feel the way I feel?

Put on my blue suede shoes
And I boarded the plane
Touched down in the land of the Delta Blues
In the middle of the pouring rain
Touched down in the land of the Delta Blues
In the middle of the pouring rain

Writer/s: Marc Cohn 
Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, DistroKid
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – Same But Different

A different kind of prompt for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday, hosted by our friend, Jim Adams. He has asked us to compare two songs and discuss the comparison between them. I have chosen two songs, both with the same name, “Somebody to Love”, but with different lyrics and from different decades.

Queen’s version was written by Freddie Mercury and recorded in 1976. The other by Justin Bieber was written by Heather Bright and The Stereotypes, originally for Usher who recorded it as a demo. Usher was Bieber’s mentor and the song was eventually recorded by Bieber in 2010. Both songs are about needing someone to love but they are quite different in depth and lyrics. Queen’s song is deep and soul-searching and Bieber’s is a light-hearted song about young love you can dance to. Both are good, popular songs.

 

Somebody to Love by Queen 

This song is sung in a gospel style, with the voices of Freddie Mercury, Brian May and Roger Taylor multitracked to sound like a choir. According to Brian May, the gospel sound was inspired by the music of Aretha Franklin.

Freddie Mercury wrote this. The lyrics reflect a man calling out to God, asking why he works so hard, but can’t find love. At the end of the song, he finds hope and decides he will not accept defeat.

This is widely reputed to have been Freddie Mercury’s favorite song he ever wrote.

Queen performed this with Elton John on lead vocals in Paris in January 1997.

On the Greatest Hits III album, which is a tribute to Freddie Mercury, George Michael sings lead.

Anne Hathaway sang this during a musical number in the 2004 movie Ella Enchanted.

Peter Hince, the head of Queen’s road crew, recalled to Mojo magazine September 2009 that “among the road crew there were songs you liked and songs you didn’t like.” He added that this was, “always one of Queen’s best. The studio version was very polished, but on-stage there was so much more guts to it.”

Hince recalled to Mojo the video was “filmed at Wessex Studios while they were making the A Day at the Races album.” He added: “Aesthetically, you had to have all four around the microphone, but John (Deacon) didn’t sing on the records. By his own admission he didn’t have the voice. He did sing on-stage but the crew always knew to keep the fader very low.”

Several bootleg recordings and live videos exist where evidently John’s mic was not turned down, and it becomes painfully obvious that the above statement is true – one particular live performance of “In The Lap Of The Gods” is wince-inducing!

In October 2009 a remake by the cast of the Fox TV musical comedy Glee returned this song to #28 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #26 on the UK singles chart. Their version was featured in the episode “The Rhodes Not Taken.”

Frank Turner covered this for the B-side to his vinyl release of “I Still Believe” in 2011.

The Voice contestant Jordan Smith’s rendition took the song back into the upper reaches of the Hot 100. The week after his performance of the song on the December 7, 2015 episode of the singing competition, Smith’s version debuted at #21 on the chart.

This was used in a commercial for the Honda Ridgeline that debuted during the 2016 Super Bowl. In the spot, a flock of sheep sing this song, having heard it when they were transported in a Ridgeline with a truck-bed audio system, which we’re sure is quite handy for teaching songs to sheep.

Courtesy of Songfacts

Lyrics
 
Each morning I get up I die a little
Can barely stand on my feet (take a look at yourself)
Take a look in the mirror and cry
Lord, what you’re doing to me
I have spent all my years in believing you
But I just can’t get no relief, Lord
Somebody uh (somebody) somebody (somebody)
Can anybody find me somebody to love?

I work (he works hard) hard every day of my life
I work ’til I ache my bones
At the end (at the end of the day) I take home my hard earned pay all on my own
I go down on my knees
And I start to pray (praise the Lord)
‘Til the tears run down from my eyes
Lord, somebody uh (somebody) somebody (somebody)
Can anybody find me somebody to love?

(He works hard) everyday (everyday)
I try and I try and I try
But everybody wants to put me down
They say I’m goin’ crazy
They say I got a lot of water in my brain
I got no common sense
I got nobody left to believe
Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah

Oh, Lord
Somebody uh (somebody) somebody (somebody)
Can anybody find me somebody to love?

(Can anybody find me somebody to love?)
Got no feel, I got no rhythm
I just keep losing my beat
I’m alright, I’m alright (he’s alright)
I ain’t gonna face no defeat
I just gotta get out of this prison cell
Someday I’m gonna be free, Lord

Find me somebody to love
Find me somebody to love
Find me somebody to love
Find me somebody to love
Find me somebody to love
Find me somebody to love
Find me somebody to love
Find me somebody to love
Find me somebody to love
Somebody (somebody) somebody (somebody)
Somebody find me, somebody find me somebody to love
Can anybody find me
Somebody to come on, love, yeah

Find me somebody to love
Find me somebody to love
Find me somebody, somebody, somebody to love (find me somebody to love)
Find me, find me, find me, find me uh somebody to love
Find me somebody to love
Find me somebody to love (anybody, anywhere)
Somebody, somebody to love yeah yeah oh (find me somebody to love)Writer/s: Freddie Mercury

 
Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Somebody to Love by Justin Bieber

Blogger-turned-music mogul Perez Hilton played a role in the making of this song, as it was he who hooked up Los Angeles-based production team, Stereotypes, with Justin’s people. “I’m so involved in music now, and I’m working with a lot of artists, I’ve been meeting with a lot of producers,” Hilton explained to MTV News. “I met with this camp in the Valley, they’re called Stereotypes. They’re these up-and-coming producers, and they played me a lot of their music, and one of their songs, the first time I heard it, I was like, ‘This is a smash. This is a huge hit.’ And then I started thinking, ‘This might be a great song for Justin Bieber.’ So I sent it over to JB’s camp. Justin loved it. They recorded the song, it’s going to be on his new album, and it’s going to be a huge hit for him.”

In this dance track Justin professes his love for a girl and tells her he’d do anything for her. “It’s basically about somebody to love,” he told MTV News. “It’s cool. It’s young. It’s nice. I think it’s like a universal record.”

The song should not be confused with those of the same title by Jefferson Airplane, Queen or Leighton Meester.

The music video for the official remix version featuring Usher was directed by Dave Meyers. The clip features Justin dancing along with several dance crews along a black backdrop, plus a scene with ninjas and a flame outline. The featured dance crews include, Randy Jackson Presents America’s Best Dance Crew season 5 winners Poreotics, and season 3’s runner up Beat Freaks. Singer/actress and model Katerina Graham makes a cameo in a scene with Poreotics and Justin’s best friend Ryan Butler, who previously appeared in the “One Time” promo, also appears alongside Bieber, wearing a T-shirt advertising his Twitter account.

Myers said that he wanted this video to be more playful, stating, “[We’re] bringing Justin into the world of dance on this one, giving Justin the chance to integrate to different styles of dance. So we kind of kept it simple with the art direction, just real graphic and really highlighting the dance. No big story lines, no crowds of people, just real clean.”

The song was originally written by Heather Bright for Usher. Bright’s other credits include Britney Spears’ Femme Fatale track, “Trouble For Me.” As well as Heather Bright, the other accredited writers are Justin and The Stereotypes, though according to her, the Canadian singer contributed little to the penning of the track. In an interview with Free Wired, Bright criticized artists who fail to pay full publishing fees on songs they didn’t write. “Rihanna takes publishing. Justin Bieber takes publishing. Kanye West takes publishing,” she said “On all the stuff that they don’t write, they take publishing.” Bright added that after “Somebody To Love” was released, she was surprised to see that Justin had received songwriting credit for her work. “How did he get a writing credit? That’s an interesting question,” she said. “I don’t know…”

Bright’s controversial comments were intended to defend Britney Spears, who has been criticized for not writing her songs. In a blog Bright gave props to Britney saying she doesn’t take publishing royalties that don’t belong to her and called her team a “bonafide class act.”

Virginia R&B singer Devin Copeland and songwriter Mareio Overton sued Justin Bieber and Usher, claiming ownership of this cut. The duo claimed the tune contains numerous lyrical and stylistic similarities to a copyrighted song they wrote in 2008 by the same name, which was presented by music scouts to Usher, with a view for him recording it for his own album Raymond v. Raymond.

A federal judge in Virginia dismissed the copyright infringement suit on January 5, 2017. The suit was dismissed “with prejudice” meaning that it can’t be re-filed.

Courtesy of Songfacts

LYRICS

{Drumma Boy)

Said you’ll never give away your heart again  
I’ll be knockin’ til you let me in  
I know you told me, you’d rather be lonely  
You don’t even know me  
That’s why I no longer wanna be a stranger  

Sorry you put your trust in others and they let you down  
(let you down)
And all the secrets an unknown evidence now in the open that you found, oh
(that you found, oh)
Cried yourself to sleep so many nights said you’d never again  
I’m not the one you hold it against  
Baby its not my blame

Yeah you independent as hell  
And doin’ it by yourself  
But what you gon’ do when the night time get cold  
I know you told me, you’d rather be lonely (lonely)
You don’t even know me  
I ain’t moving out the way for nothing, I’m stubborn  

Cause you said you’d never, give away your heart again  
I’ll be knockin’ til you let me in  
I know you told me, you’d rather be lonely  
(I want the title of your closest friend)  
You don’t even know me  
That’s why I no longer wanna be a stranger  

Tell me  
What I gotta do
What I gotta do
What I gotta do, do
What I gotta do
What I gotta do
What I gotta do
Yeah  

Your stuck inside no matter how hard you try to forget  
(to forget)
Don’t you wish there was a button we could reset  
And make it easy  
But you can’t take back the decision that you made to love  
No, oh no  
I know its the one that you regretting, not too proud of, no
Because you keep tellin’ me  

Yeah you independent as hell  
And doin’ it by yourself  
But what you gone do when the night time get cold  
I know you told me, you’d rather be lonely  
You don’t even know me  
I ain’t moving out the way for nothing, I’m stubborn  

Cause you said you’d never give away your heart again  
I’ll be knockin til you let me in  
I know you told me, you’d rather be lonely  
(I wan the title of your closest friend, baby)  
You don’t even know me  
That’s why I no longer wanna be a stranger  

Baby tell me  
What I gotta do
What I gotta do
What I gotta do

Baby tell me
What I gotta do
What I gotta do
What I gotta do

I remember the break up  
And the condition that my heart was in  
But I would never surrender  
No no  
I gotta be stronger, there’s nothing time can’t heal  
Girl, I know your scarred  
All I ask is a chance to come in and do my part  
It’s nothing but fear and you’ve been holding on since  
Too under pressure and I see us sinking in  

Said you’ll never give away your heart again  
I’ll be knockin’ til you let me in  
I know you told me, you’d rather be lonely  
You don’t even know me  
That’s why I no longer wanna be a stranger  

What I gotta do
What I gotta do
What I gotta do

What I gotta do
What I gotta do
What I gotta do

Song Lyric Sunday – Elevator Music

This week we are searching for Elevator Music for Song Lyric Sunday! Our friend Maggie, from Cave Walls, has provided the fun prompt. The first thing I thought of was something by Kenny G but then there wouldn’t be any lyrics to share with you here!

I went searching for ideas and found it fascinating that elevator music was a big deal in the 60s. Who knew? It was not high on my list of music! Anyway I do remember that bossa nova style music was popular at that time and I thought of this version of Fool on the Hill by Sergio Mendes and Brasil 66. This is one of my favorite Beatles songs and it is performed beautifully here. Too good for an elevator maybe. It was interesting to read how active Mendes still is and of all the collaborations he’s had with current artists. I hope you enjoy it.

The Song

Paul McCartney wrote this song. It’s about a man who is considered a fool by others, but whose foolish demeanor is actually an indication of wisdom.

An event which prompted this song happened when Paul was walking his dog, Martha, on Primrose Hill one morning. As he watched the sun rise, he noticed that Martha was missing. Paul turned around to look for his dog, and there a man stood, who appeared on the hill without making a sound. The gentleman was dressed respectably, in a belted raincoat. Paul knew this man had not been there seconds earlier as he had looked in that direction for Martha. Paul and the stranger exchanged a greeting, and this man then spoke of what a beautiful view it was from the top of this hill that overlooked London. Within a few seconds, Paul looked around again, and the man was gone. He had vanished as he had appeared. A friend of McCartney’s, Alistair Taylor, was present with Paul during this strange incident, and wrote of this event in his book, Yesterday.

Both Paul and Alistair could not imagine what happened to this man. He had seemed to vanish in thin air. The nearest trees for cover were too far to reach by walking or running in a few seconds, and the crest of the hill was too far as well to reach in that short time. What made the experience even more mysterious, was that just before this man first appeared, Paul and Alistair were speaking to each other of the beauty they observed of the view towards London and the existence of God. Once back home, they spent the morning discussing what had happened, trying to make some sense of it. They both agreed that this was something others were infer occurred as a result of an “acid trip,” but they both swore they had not taken or used any drugs. When Paul filmed the sequence for this song in the film, it shows him on a hilltop overlooking the town of Nice.

Paul played this for John Lennon while they were writing “With A Little Help From My Friends.” John made him write down the words so he wouldn’t forget.

This is a very curious song musically as well as lyrically, as it shifts between major and minor keys. Dan Wilson, a songwriter whose credits include Adele’s “Someone Like You” and Chris Stapleton’s “When The Stars Come Out,” explained in a Songfacts interview: “I think that song is musically just incredible. And mysterious. The way it goes from minor to major to minor just kills me every time.

Why it isn’t a funny kind of silly song in my heart is just a mystery to me, also. The lyrics are like a nursery rhyme. It’s so simple and there’s nothing to it, yet I find it deeply sad and affecting and almost tragic, like it’s some kind of tragedy of human nature being explained or channeled in a super-simple song that toggles from minor to major and back again.”

This began as a solo composition with Paul McCartney at the piano. Flutes were added last.

This was not a hit for The Beatles, but a 1968 cover version by Sergio Mendes & Brasil ’66 went to #6 in the US. In America, this was the highest-charting Beatles cover until 1975, when Elton John took “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds” to #1.

This was used in the Beatles movie Magical Mystery Tour.

Courtesy of Songfacts

The Artist

Sérgio Santos Mendes (Brazilian Portuguese: [ˈsɛʁʒju ˈsɐ̃tuz ˈmẽdʒis]; born February 11, 1941) is a Brazilian musician. He has over 55 releases, and plays bossa nova heavily crossed with jazz and funk. He was nominated for an Oscar for Best Original Song in 2012 as co-writer of the song “Real in Rio” from the animated film Rio.

Mendes is a unique example of a Brazilian musician primarily known in the United States, where his albums were recorded and where most of his touring took place.

Mendes is married to Gracinha Leporace, who has performed with him since the early 1970s. Mendes has also collaborated with many artists through the years, including The Black Eyed Peas, with whom he re-recorded in 2006 a version of his breakthrough hit “Mas que Nada”.

Mendes was born in Niterói, Brazil, the son of a physician. He attended the local conservatory with hopes of becoming a classical pianist. As his interest in jazz grew, he started playing in nightclubs in the late 1950s just as bossa nova, a jazz-inflected derivative of samba, was emerging. Mendes played with Antônio Carlos Jobim (regarded as a mentor) and many U.S. jazz musicians who toured Brazil.

Mendes formed the Sexteto Bossa Rio and recorded Dance Moderno in 1961. Touring Europe and the United States, Mendes recorded albums with Cannonball Adderley and Herbie Mann and played Carnegie Hall. Mendes moved to the U.S. in 1964 and cut two albums under the Sergio Mendes & Brasil ’65 group name with Capitol Records and Atlantic Records.

Mendes became full partners with Richard Adler, a Brooklyn-born American who had previously brought Bossa Trés plus two dancers, Joe Bennett and a Brazilian partner, to appear on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1963. He was also accompanied by Jobim; Flavio Ramos, and Aloísio de Oliveira, a record and TV producer from Rio who used to be a member of Carmen Miranda’s backing group Bando da Lua. The Musicians Union only allowed this group to appear on one TV show and make one club appearance (Basin Street East) before ordering them to leave the U.S. When the new group Brasil ’65 was formed, Shelly Manne, Bud Shank and other West Coast musicians got Mendes and the others into the local musicians union. Adler and Mendes formed Brasil ’65, which consisted of Wanda Sá and Rosinha de Valença, as well as the Sergio Mendes Trio. The group recorded albums for Atlantic and Capitol.

Though his early singles with Brasil ’66 (most notably “Mas que Nada”) met with some success, Mendes really burst into mainstream prominence when he performed the Oscar-nominated “The Look of Love” on the Academy Awards telecast in April 1968. Brasil ’66’s version of the song quickly shot into the top 10, peaking at No. 4 and eclipsing Dusty Springfield’s version from the soundtrack of the movie Casino Royale. Mendes spent the rest of 1968 enjoying consecutive top 10 and top 20 hits with his follow-up singles “The Fool on the Hill” and “Scarborough Fair”. From 1968 on, Mendes was arguably the biggest Brazilian star in the world and enjoyed immense popularity worldwide, performing in venues as varied as stadium arenas and the White House, where he gave concerts for presidents Lyndon B. Johnson and Richard Nixon. The Brasil ’66 group appeared at the World Expo in Osaka, Japan in June 1970.

Mendes’ career in the U.S. stalled in the mid-1970s, but he remained popular in South America and Japan. His two albums with Bell Records in 1973 and 1974 followed by several for Elektra from 1975 on, found Mendes continuing to mine the best in American pop music and post-Bossa writers of his native Brazil, while forging new directions in soul with collaborators like Stevie Wonder, who wrote Mendes’ R&B-inflected minor hit “The Real Thing”.

In 1983, he rejoined Alpert’s A&M records and enjoyed success with a self-titled album and several follow-up albums, all of which received considerable adult contemporary airplay with charting singles. “Never Gonna Let You Go”, featuring vocals by Joe Pizzulo and Leeza Miller, equalled the success of his 1968 single “The Look of Love” by reaching No. 4 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart; it also spent four weeks atop the Billboard adult contemporary chart. In 1984, he recorded the Confetti album, which had the hit songs “Olympia”, which was also used as a theme song for the Olympic Games that year and “Alibis”. The 1980s also saw Mendes working with singer Lani Hall again on the song “No Place to Hide” from the Brasil ’86 album, and as producer of her vocals on the title song for the James Bond film Never Say Never Again.

By the time Mendes released his Grammy-winning Elektra album Brasileiro in 1992, he was the undisputed master of pop-inflected Brazilian jazz. The late-1990s lounge music revival brought retrospection and respect to Mendes’ oeuvre, particularly the classic Brasil ’66 albums.

The album Timeless, released February 14, 2006 by Concord Records,  features a wide array of neo-soul and alternative hip hopguest artists, including The Black Eyed Peas, Erykah Badu, Black Thought, Jill Scott, Chali 2na of Jurassic 5, India.Arie, John Legend, Justin Timberlake, Q-Tip, Stevie Wonder and Pharoahe Monch.

The 2006 re-recorded version of “Mas que Nada” with The Black Eyed Peas had additional vocals by Gracinha Leporace (Mendes’ wife); this version is included on Timeless. In Brazil, the song is also well known for being the theme song for the local television channel Globo’s Estrelas. The Black Eyed Peas’ version contains a sample of their 2004 hit “Hey Mama”. The re-recorded song became popular on many European charts. On the UK Singles Chart, the song entered at No. 29 and rose to and peaked at No. 6 on its second week on the chart.

He makes an appearance dancing along for one of the segments Pharrell Williams’ 24 hour of happy.

Mendes served as co-producer on the soundtrack albums for two animated films about his homeland: 2011’s Rio and its 2014 sequel.

On June 25, 2019, The New York Times Magazine listed Sérgio Mendes among hundreds of artists whose material was reportedly destroyed in the 2008 Universal fire.

Courtesy of a Wiki

LYRICS

Day after day
Alone on a hill
The man with the foolish grin
Is keeping perfectly still
But nobody wants to know him
They can see that he's just a fool
And he never gives an answer

But the fool on the hill
Sees the sun going down
And the eyes in his head
See the world spinning 'round

Well on the way
Head in a cloud
The man of a thousand voices
Talking perfectly loud

But nobody ever hears him
Or the sound he appears to make
And he never seems to notice

But the fool on the hill
Sees the sun going down
And the eyes in his head
See the world spinning 'round

And nobody seems to like him
They can tell what he wants to do
And he never shows his feelings

But the fool on the hill
Sees the sun going down
And the eyes in his head
See the world spinning 'round, oh oh oh, 'round 'round 'round 'round

He never listens to them
He knows that they're the fools
They don't like him

The fool on the hill
Sees the sun going down
And the eyes in his head
See the world spinning 'round

Oh, 'round 'round 'round 'round, oh

Writer/s: John Lennon, Paul McCartney 

Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFin

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