Category: Song Lyric Sunday

Song Lyric Sunday – Wonder

Song Lyric Sunday prompts for this week are Amaze, Astonish, Curious, Shock, Surprise and Wonder suggested by Melanie B Cee, aka Sparky of Sparks From A Combustible Mind.

I have picked the Natalie Merchant song, “Wonder” that I have always liked. Hope you like it too!

The Song

When she was a teenager, Natalie Merchant worked at a day camp for special needs children, many of whom had been institutionalized since infancy and abandoned by their parents. This song was inspired by that experience.

She explained on a VH1 Storytellers appearance: “When I was 13 years old, we’re talking 1976, I spent my summer working as a volunteer for a bunch of hippies, basically, that got a seed grant from the Carter administration, which had a lot of really wonderful programs for the arts. These people started a day camp for handicapped children, and I worked for them the whole summer. A lot of these children were institutionalized – their parents had left the scene a long time ago. They didn’t function so well in a conventional sense, but it seems that a lot of the children had developed like a private language or new senses so they could navigate through the world, especially the blind and the deaf children that we worked with.

From an early age, I had that contact with children who had special needs. I had lost my fear of intimacy with them – especially with Down syndrome kids, they could be really unpredictable and up to that point I had been a little frightened of them. I maintained some of the friendships with those kids and I was always open to meeting children with special needs. So when I wrote the song ‘Wonder,’ I wrote the song about a woman who was born with handicaps that seemed insurmountable, but she did overcome them, greatly because she had a loving family, especially her adoptive mother – she had been given up to an institution at birth.”
This is a very meaningful song to many people who grew up with special needs and their caretakers. The song views these people as “wonders,” with doctors having no explanation for their condition, but seeing the work of God in the creation.

“I’ve met a lot of people through this song, and they’ve told me that they’ve taken it on as their song, that it describes them,” Merchant said. “It describes their strengths in spite of what others would see as deficiencies.”
Natalie Merchant performed this song, along with “Carnival,” on an episode of Saturday Night Live hosted by David Schwimmer in 1995.

The Lyrics

Doctors have come from distant cities, just to see me
Stand over my bed, disbelieving what they're seeing

They say I must be one of the wonders
Of God's own creation
And as far as they see, they can offer
No explanation

Newspapers ask intimate questions, want confessions
They reach into my head to steal, the glory of my story

They say I must be one of the wonders
Of God's own creation
And as far as they see, they can offer
No explanation

Ooo, I believe, fate smiled
And destiny laughed as you came to my cradle
Know this child will be able
Laughed as my body she lifted
Know this child will be gifted
With love, with patience, and with faith
She'll make her way, she'll make her way

People see me I'm a challenge to your balance
I'm over your heads how I confound you
And astound you
To know I must be one of the wonders
God's own creation
And as far as they see, they can offer
Me no explanation

Ooo, I believe, fate smiled
And destiny laughed as she came to my cradle
Know this child will be able
Laughed as she came to my mother
Know this child will not suffer
Laughed as my body she lifted
Know this child will be gifted
With love, with patience and with faith
She'll make her way, she'll make her way
She'll make her way, she'll make her way

Writer/s: NATALIE A MERCHANT 
Publisher: Downtown Music Publishing
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – Guilty

The prompts for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday, hosted by Jim Adams, are Disgust, Embarrassment, Guilt, Regret, Remorse and Shame suggested by Melanie B Cee aka Sparky of Sparks From A Combustible Mind. I thought they were difficult at first but then I remembered a song by Barry Gibb and Barbra Streisand called ’Guilty’ I hope you enjoy it.

The Song

Guilty” is a vocal duet between Barbra Streisand and Barry Gibb. The song was written by all three Bee Gees: Barry, Robin & Maurice Gibb. Released as a single from Streisand’s 1980 album of the same name. “Guilty” peaked at No. 3 on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart and No. 5 on the adult contemporary chart. In the UK, the song reached No. 34 on the UK Singles Chart. The single was certified gold by the RIAA. In addition, “Guilty” won a Grammy Award in the category Best Pop Vocal Performance, Duo or Group. The song also appeared on the 2001 Bee Gees compilation, Their Greatest Hits: The Record.

The funny thing about Guilty is that while it’s credited as a Barbra Streisand album, it’s essentially a Bee Gees album with Streisand singing on it. Barry Gibb did much of the work on the album including writing, producing, and arranging. He plays guitar and sings much of the backing vocals as well as a couple of songs with Streisand including the title track. And the album cover shows Streisand and Gibb nestled with each other in white clothing against a white backdrop. Streisand wasn’t trying to hide the connection. Despite the massive backlash against the group at the time, the public was perfectly fine with hearing the Bee Gees in a supporting role.

The idea for Guilty came from Streisand who after attending a Bee Gees concert at Los Angeles’ Dodger Stadium approached the group about having them collaborate with her on her new album. The initial plan was for the Bee Gees to write and produce half the album but Streisand liked the songs they wrote so much that she and Barry wound up working on the entire album. “Guilty” was written by Barry along with his brothers and bandmates Robin and Maurice Gibb, the only song on the album with writing credits from all three Bee Gees, with Barry producing alongside regular collaborators Albhy Galuten and Karl Richardson.

“Guilty,” the album’s first track, was an obvious choice for a lead single but Streisand and her label Columbia held back on releasing it. By this point, Streisand had hit #1 twice with duets, 1978’s “You Don’t Bring Me Flowers” with Neil Diamond and 1979’s “No More Tears (Enough Is Enough)” with Donna Summer, and she didn’t want the public to see her as just a duets artist. Columbia released “Woman In Love,” a ballad-heavy solo track as the lead single from Guilty weeks before the album’s release to establish the album in its own right. It turned out to be the right decision as “Woman In Love” hit #1 on the Hot 100 in October 1980 becoming Streisand’s fifth and final #1 hit. The success eventually led Columbia to release “Guilty” and it wound up being a big hit as well.

The Bee Gees influence is heavy on “Guilty.” Like a lot of Bee Gees songs, “Guilty” is a love song with vague lyrics about a couple expressing their devotion to each other. Like many Bee Gees songs, it’s filled with lyrics that don’t make a whole lot of sense using Max Martin’s method of melodic math well before he popularized it, “You battle on with the love you’re livin’ on/We are devotion.” None of the lyrics for the album were re-written which says a lot. And it also has lyrics that are trying way too hard to be poetic, “Make it a crime to be lonely or sad/Our love will climb any mountain near or far.” The influence shows up in more direct ways. The build-up to the chorus sounds a lot to me like the post-chorus of “Night Fever.” And one of the lyrics, “Eyes can see that we got a highway to the sky” is a direct lift of the lyric, “You and me girl got a highway to the sky,” from “Too Much Heaven.” 

On Barry Gibb’s demo for “Guilty” released in 2006, you can easily hear what the song could have been with Barry singing in his trademark falsetto throughout. Considering the lyrics don’t exactly require a duet, if the Bee Gees hadn’t fallen so drastically it very well could have been another hit for them. Gibb and Streisand could have easily turned “Guilty” into a show-stopping vocal duet. Instead, their performances are toned down singing in a more restrained manner and not being too showy. 

Courtesy of D’Orazi Hit Parade and Wiki

The Lyrics

Shadows falling, baby, we stand alone
Out on the street anybody you meet got a heartache of their own
(It oughta be illegal)
Make it a crime to be lonely or sad
(It oughta be illegal)
You got a reason for livin'
You battle on with the love you're livin' on

You gotta be mine
We take it away
It's gotta be night and day
Just a matter of time
And we got nothing to be guilty of
Our love will climb any mountain near or far, we are
And we never let it end

We are devotion
And we got nothing to be sorry for
Our love is one in a million
Eyes can see that we got a highway to the sky
I don't wanna hear your goodbye

Pulse's racing, darling
How grand we are
Little by little we meet in the middle
There's danger in the dark
(It oughta be illegal)
Make it a crime to be out in the cold
(It oughta be illegal)
You got a reason for livin'
You battle on with the love you're buildin' on

You gotta be mine
We take it away
It's gotta be night and day
Just a matter of time
And we got nothing to be guilty of
Our love will climb any mountain near or far, we are

And we never let it end
We are devotion
And we got nothing to be sorry for
Our love is one in a million
Eyes can see that we got a highway to the sky

I don't want to hear your goodbye
Don't want to hear your goodbye
I don't want to hear your
And we got nothing, and we got nothing to be guilty of
Our love will climb and mountain near or far, we are
And we never let it end

We are devotion
And we got nothing to be sorry for
Our love is one in a million
Eyes can see that we got a highway to the sky
Don't want to hear your 
And we got nothing to be guilty of, my love

Lyrics submitted by Ice
Guilty Lyrics as written by Barry Gibb, Robin Hugh Gibb, Maurice Ernest Gibb
Lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group
Lyrics powered by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – Silver Spring

I knew which song I wanted to use the moment I saw the prompts for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday. Our friend, Paula from Light Motifs II, provided the prompts of Money, Gold, Silver or Rich. My choice is a classic Fleetwood Mac song, Silver Spring. I hope you enjoy it.

The Song

Stevie Nicks wrote this after her breakup with Lindsey Buckingham, the band’s guitarist and her long time boyfriend. She wanted to make sure he would never forget about her: “I’ll follow you down till the sound of my voice will haunt you.” In 2009, she told Rolling Stone: “It was me realizing that Lindsey was going to haunt me for the rest of my life, and he has.”

Nicks got the idea for the title when she saw a sign for Silver Spring, Maryland while driving with Lindsey. The name was, to her, so beautiful that she wrote it into the song.

This was supposed to appear on Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours album, but it was cut due to space limitations of vinyl. In 2002, it appeared where it was supposed to on the DVD-A release of Rumours.
This was used as the B-side of the singles “Go Your Own Way” and “Don’t Stop.” It didn’t appear on an album until their 1992 The Chain box set. It was also released on their 2002 greatest hits album.
Nicks used to check into hotels on the road under the alias “Miss Silver Spring.”

It was bumped off the Rumors album by another song Nicks wrote called “I Don’t Want To Know,” which the rest of the band liked better and fit better on the album because it was shorter. Stevie was very upset with the decision and considered refusing to sing “I Don’t Want To Know” in protest.
This was finally included in it’s rightful place on the Rumours re-issue, released in 2004. This is a 2-disc set which also includes a longer bonus version of the song.

During this song’s performance on Fleetwood Mac’s 1994 DVD The Dance, halfway through the song while singing, Stevie turns towards Lindsay and appears to be singing directly to him. It was as if she was reminding him who the song was about. Once they locked eyes, you could see and feel the emotions they must have felt many years ago when they dated and eventually broke up. A very intense moment.

Stevie Nicks appeared on two episodes of the TV series American Horror Story: Coven, including the finale, where she performed “Seven Wonders” to open the show. Later in the episode, this song was used to underscore a scene where a witch was sent to burn at the stake.

The Lyrics

You could be my silver spring
Blue-green colors flashin'
I would be your only dream
Your shinin' autumn ocean crashin' 
Don't say that she's pretty 
And did you say that she loves you?
Baby, I don't want to know

So I'll begin not to love you 
Turn around, you'll see me runnin'
I'll say I loved you years ago 
And tell myself you never loved me no 
Don't say that she's pretty 
And did you say that she loves you?
Baby, I don't want to know

Oh no
And can you tell me was it worth it?
Baby, I don't want to know

Time cast a spell on you but you won't forget me
I know I could've loved you
But you would not let me 

Time cast a spell on you but you won't forget me
I know I could've loved you but you would not let me 
I'll follow you down 'til the sound of my voice will haunt you 
Give me just a chance, you'll never get away from the sound of the woman that loves you

Was I such a fool?
I'll follow you down til' the sound of my voice will haunt you
Give me just a chance, you'll never get away from the sound of the woman that loves you?
Time cast a spell on you but you won't forget me
I know I could've loved you, but you would not let me
I'll follow you down 'til the sound of my voice will haunt you

Writer/s: Stevie Nicks 
Publisher: Wixen Music Publishing
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Courtesy of Songfacts

Song Lyric Sunday – Can’t Get You Out Of My Head

This week’s Song Lyric Sunday prompts are Head, Hat, Hair and Scarf suggested by our friend Paula of Light Motifs II, The first song I thought of was “Can’t Get You Out Of My Head” by Kylie Minogue. It does tend to stay with you, so be warned! I’ve been singing it all day!

The Song

True to the title, this is a song you can’t get out of your head. It’s sometimes known as “The La La Song” because the chorus is Kylie singing “La, la, la, la, la, la, la, la” over and over, which combined with the irresistible groove makes it an effective earworm. The song even starts with that chorus.

The verses are an afterthought on this one, there to support the music. The lyric finds Minogue crazy in love, hoping she can spend a lifetime with this lucky guy.

This was written by Cathy Dennis and former Mud guitarist Rob Davis. Dennis had a few hits as a solo artist in the early ’90s, including “Just Another Dream” and “Too Many Walls.” Regarding “Can’t Get You Out Of My Head,” she told Songwriting magazine: “It was organic, we didn’t try and do anything contrived, so when something did spark we were both able to embrace it and jump on it and go with it. I thought the song is very ‘left of center’ for pop.”

Cathy Dennis and Rob Davis originally wrote this for S Club 7 after their manager, Simon Fuller, asked the duo to come up with a song for the British pop group. After Fuller heard the demo, he felt it wasn’t right for S Club 7 and rejected it. It was then offered to Sophie Ellis-Bextor, but she turned it down. Davis then met with Minogue’s A&R executive Jamie Nelson who, after hearing the demo cassette of the song, booked it for Minogue to record.

For most Americans, this was the first they heard from Minogue since 1988, when her cover of “The Loco-Motion” hit #3. She became an international sensation that year, but in the ’90s her support was concentrated in the UK and in her home country of Australia. “Can’t Get You Out Of My Head” put her back on the charts in many more territories.

This song fits into the disco revival timeline, bringing the boogie back in the ’00s after Madonna, Daft Punk and Jamiroquai flew the flag in the late ’90s. Minogue stuck to the sound and had a number of Dance hits in America as disco crested again in the ’10s. Her 2020 was even titled Disco.

The year before this was released, Minogue played the Green Fairy in the movie Moulin Rouge. In Australia, she’s a huge celebrity thanks to her role on the soap opera Neighbours and her high-profile romance with INXS lead singer Michael Hutchence.

In the UK, this song was huge, staying in the Top 40 for five months. This song’s first week on the UK chart was Kylie’s personal 262nd week on chart, making her the most successful chart act not from the US or UK. “Can’t Get You Out Of My Head” is her biggest seller in the UK, selling 1,037,235 copies. It was the biggest single and the most played song of 2001 there (it was aired 45,577 times on UK radio).

At the 2002 Brit Awards, Kylie performed a version of this to the beat of “Blue Monday” by New Order. This remix was released as the B-side of her 2002 hit “Love At First Sight.”
The song was accompanied by a state-of-the-art video directed by Dawn Shadforth, who had Kylie dressed in various futuristic fashions on a virtual set. The look evoked the ’60s sci-fi renditions of Utopia.

This was the most-played tune of the 2000s in the UK, according to PRS for Music, which collects royalties on behalf of songwriters and composers. The track received the most airplay and live covers in the first decade of the 21st century whilst Britney Spears’ single “Toxic” was the second most played song. The same songwriter, Cathy Dennis, penned both tunes.

The Lyrics

La, la, la, la, la, la, la, la
La, la, la, la, la, la, la, la
La, la, la, la, la, la, la, la
La, la, la, la, la, la, la, la

I just can't get you out of my head
Boy, your lovin' is all I think about
I just can't get you out of my head
Boy, its more than I dare to think about

La, la, la, la, la, la, la, la
La, la, la, la, la, la, la, la

I just can't get you out of my head
Boy, your lovin' is all I think about
I just can't get you out of my head
Boy, its more than I dare to think about

Every night
Every day
Just to be there in your arms
Won't you stay
Won't you stay
Stay forever and ever and ever ah ah

La, la, la, la, la, la, la, la
La, la, la, la, la, la, la, la
La, la, la, la, la, la, la, la
La, la, la, la, la, la, la, la

I just can't get you out of my head
Boy, your lovin' is all I think about
I just can't get you out of my head
Boy, its more than I dare to think about

There's a dark secret in me
Don't leave me lost in your arms
Set me free
Feel the need in me
Set me free
Stay forever and ever and ever ah ah

La, la, la, la, la, la, la, la
La, la, la, la, la, la, la, la
La, la, la, la, la, la, la, la
La, la, la, la, la, la, la, la

I just can't get you out of my head (La,la,la La,la,la,la,la)

Songwriters: Cathy Dennis / Robert Berkeley Davis
Can't Get You Out of My Head lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC,
Universal Music Publishing Group

Courtesy of Songfacts

Song Lyric Sunday – Hole in my Shoe

Socks, Shoes, Boots and Feet are the prompts for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday, suggested by Paula of Light Motifs II. I have chosen an old one from the swinging sixties by Traffic. A band that I really liked with two of my favorite performers, Steve Winwood and Dave Mason. The song is typical of the time and the lyrics are as silly as “I am the Walrus” by the Beatles.

The Song

This psychedelic song was written by Traffic’s guitarist Dave Mason, who played sitar on the track. Depending on your state of mind, you might find some weighty meaning in the song, but Mason says he was just writing down random thoughts in the style of a nursery rhyme. He also insists that he hadn’t tried LSD when he wrote it. In a Songfacts interview with Mason, he explained: “That’s the first song I ever wrote. It was my first attempt at songwriting. I mean, that stuff I did back then, when I listen to it, I cringe and realize I need to work on writing. But writing comes out of living. You have to have something.”

Dave Mason tells us that this song was “the beginning of the end as far as the other three guys were concerned for me.” The band’s second single (after “Paper Sun”), it was a the biggest UK hit for Traffic, but it wasn’t what Mason’s bandmates had in mind, since they didn’t think it represented their sound. Steve Winwood explained to The Sun June 26, 2008: “We never wanted to be a pop band but we had a hit with ‘Shoe,’ which was Dave’s song. Dave had his own idea about the band, the rest of us had another one – a not-quite-as-sensible one, really, because it wasn’t half as commercial.”Mason quit the band soon afterwards and Traffic began to develop a less commercial sound, which put an end to their run of hit singles in the UK. However their new material proved popular on American Rock stations and it gave the band a second wind across the Atlantic.

The monologue in the middle of the song was by Francine Heimann. Little is known about her.

In 1984 Neil (AKA actor Nigel Planer) recorded a humorous cover, which again fell one place short from topping the UK charts. Neil was a hippie character played by Nigel Planer in the BBC comedy series The Young Ones and there was a great deal of comic potential in Planer’s hippie student singing about the “hole in my shoe letting in water.” It won the 1985 Brit Award for Best Comedy Record, the only time the category was included. To promote the single, Planer performed this song live on the BBC music show Top of the Pops. In a memorable performance he stumbled and knocked down the scenery.

Traffic never performed this song, in large part because of Steve Winwood’s disdain for it. He once called it a “trite little song.”

Courtesy of Songfacts

The Lyrics

I looked to the sky
With an elephant's eye
Was looking at me
From a bubblegum tree
And all that I knew was
The hole in my shoe which
Was letting in water (letting in water)

I walked through a field 
That just wasn't real
With a hundred tin soldiers
Would shoot at my shoulder
And all that I knew
The hole in my shoe which
Was letting in water (letting in water)

(I climbed on the back of a giant albatross
Which flew through a crack in the cloud
To a place where happiness reigned all year round
And music played ever so loudly)

I started to fall 
And suddenly woke
And the dew on the grass
Had soaked through my coat
And all that I knew
The hole in my shoe which
Was letting in water (letting in water)

Writer/s: DAVE MASON 
Publisher: T.R.O. INC., Universal Music Publishing Group
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – Long Cool Woman (In a Black Dress)

Today’s Song Lyric Sunday prompts have been suggested by Paula from Light Motifs II. They are Suit, Pants, Dress and Shirt. An old song came to mind. Long Cool Woman by the Hollies. I always liked it because it was so different from what the Hollies had previously recorded and to me it was reminiscent of songs from Creedence Clearwater Revival. It was interesting to see that John Fogerty had also noticed the similarities and had secured an out of court settlement. I hope you enjoy it.

This tale of a government agent and a femme fatale contains one of the classic indecipherable lyrics in rock history. The part after “she was a long cool woman in a black dress” is “just a 5′ 9″ beautiful tall.”
The Distant Light album was out for a year before this song was released as a single. Before the single was released, lead singer Allan Clarke left the group, replaced by Swedish singer Michael Rickfors (another founding member, Graham Nash, left in 1968). After “Long Cool Woman” became a hit in the US, Clarke rethought his solo career and came back. The group released one album with Rickfors, Romany in 1972, before Clarke took back his position.

On the charts, this was a rare miss in the UK, where the Hollies were from and where they had their greatest success. It was surprising, however, how well it did in the US.

This is the only Hollies single without any backing vocals. The reason why Clarke is the only singer on this record is that he didn’t intended the song to be released on a Hollies album, but as a record of his own. When the band learned that he intended to do a solo recording, Clarke was issued an ultimatum – he could either remain with The Hollies or pursue a solo career, but not both. Clarke told Rolling Stone in 1973: “I think with me the band feared that if I got a hit I’d leave. How can you stop destiny? Now, if they originally agreed, I might not even have left. ‘Long Cool Woman’ would have been released a year earlier, and we’d have done a few tours of the States and maybe would have been really big.”

Clarke wrote this song with the Brittish songwriters Roger Cook and Roger Greenaway. Cook and Greenaway also wrote “I’d Like To Teach The World To Sing” by The New Seekers.

Clarke, Cook and Greenaway wrote the song in England about the bootlegging days during the American prohibition era. Cook recalled to The Tennessean that the trio returned to their office after having “had a skinful” and decided it would be fun to write a song about “Prohibition and all the bad people surrounding it.” So they came up with a story about “the FBI raiding and this (woman) singing at the bar. (The narrator) doesn’t want her to get in trouble. So he kind of saves her.”Note to readers outside the UK: A “skinful” is a British term, essentially meaning an amount of alcohol that is enough to make a person drunk.

The song has featured in a number of movies, including the 2000 Walt Disney film Remember The Titans, the 2005 sports prison comedy The Longest Yard and the 2009 supernatural drama The Lovely Bones.

This was used in a 2021 Super Bowl commercial for the sandwich chain Jimmy John’s. In the spot, Brad Garrett plays a mob-like kingpin trying to protect his empire of low-quality meats against the insurgent Jimmy John’s.

For this song, Allan Clarke imitated John Fogerty’s vocal style on Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Green River.” The Creedence frontman was unimpressed and secured an out-of-court settlement.

Song Lyric Sunday – Emotion

The prompts for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday were suggested by Di of Pensitivity101. They are: Anxiety, Delight, Emotions, Pain, Pride and Relief. I remembered a few songs with Emotion in the title settling for the one written by The Bee Gees, but I have chosen the Destiny’s Child version. I particularly liked it and I hope you enjoy it along with the video. its fun to see the young Beyonce, Kelly Rowland and Michelle Williams.

The Song

In 1977, Barry and Robin Gibb of the BeeGees wrote “Emotion” for Australian singer Samantha Sang, and the song reached number three on the Billboard Hot 100 Chart in 1978. It was her only hit. The three Gibb brothers provide backup vocals. The song was intended for the film Saturday Night Fever, but was not used in the movie. It does appear in the 1978 Joan Collins film The Stud.

The Bee Gees ended up recording their own version of the song in 1994 for an album called Love Songs, which was never released. The song was eventually included on the 2001 compilation Their Greatest Hits: ‘The Record’, however, and was covered by Destiny’s Child that same year. The girl group’s rendition ultimately became an international hit, reaching the top ten on the US Hot 100 chart, and top five on the UK Singles Chart.

In 2001 Destiny’s Child released a cover version of “Emotion” on their album Survivor, which was mostly comprised of bumping dance numbers about female empowerment. “Emotion” showcased a different side of the group, and the sensitive ballad was released as a single in October 2001 following the September 11 terrorist attacks in America. This version reached #10 US and #3 UK.

Courtesy of beegees.com and Songfacts

The Lyrics

Hey, yeah, yeah
Hey, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah
Ooh yeah

It's over and done
But the heartache lives on inside
And who is the one you're clinging to
Instead of me tonight?

And where are you now
Now that I need you?
Tears on my pillow
Wherever you go, go
I'll cry me a river
That leads to your ocean
You'll never see me fall apart

In the words of a broken heart
It's just emotions taking me over
Caught up in sorrow, lost in the song
But if you don't come back
Come home to me, darling
Don't you know there's nobody left in this world to hold me tight
And don't you know there's nobody left in this world kiss goodnight
Kiss goodnight
Goodnight
Goodnight

I'm there at your side
A part of all the things you are
But you got a part of someone else
You gotta go find your shining star

And where are you now
Now that I need you?
Tears on my pillow
Wherever you go
I'll cry me a river
That leads to your ocean
You'll never see me fall apart

In the words of a broken heart
It's just emotions taking me over (taking me over)
Caught up in sorrow, lost in the song (yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah)
But if you don't come back
Come home to me, darling
Don't you know there's nobody left in this world to hold me tight
Nobody left in this world to hold me tight
Nobody left in this world kiss goodnight
Nobody left in this world

And where are you now
Now that I need you?
Tears on my pillow
Wherever you, you go
I'll cry me a river
That leads to your ocean
You'll never see me fall apart

In the words of a broken heart
It's just emotions taking me over
I'm caught up in sorrow, lost in the song (don't you know I'm lost without you, baby)
But if you don't come back
Come home to me, darling
Nobody left in this world to hold me tight (yeah, nobody, nobody to hold me)
Nobody left in this world kiss goodnight (nobody to kiss me, yeah)
Goodnight
Goodnight

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Barry Alan Gibb / Robin Hugh Gibb
Emotion lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

Song Lyric Sunday – Buffalo Soldier

Jim Adams, our host of Song Lyric Sunday, has handed over the prompt reins today to Di from the blog Pensitivity. She has asked us to find songs with Army, Soldier or War in the title or lyrics. I have chosen Bob Marley’s Buffalo Soldier. I hope you enjoy it.

The Song

The Buffalo Soldiers were a segregated regiment of black cavalry fighters during the American campaign to rid the West of “Indians” so that “civilized” white people could gain the lands used by Native Americans. Ironically, many of the soldiers were slaves taken from Africa. Bob Marley gives a small history lesson as a protest song about the black man’s role in building the country that continues to oppress him.

Released two years after Marley’s death, this song was one of the last that he recorded. Issued as a single, it reached #4 on the UK charts, where Marley had as much success posthumously as he did when he was alive: seven more released charted after this one.

The song was included on Confrontation (1983), which was the first Bob Marley album released after his death, and also on the hits collection Legend (1984), which became the best-selling reggae album of all time.

Marley wrote this song with fellow Jamaican, Noel Williams, who went by the name King Sporty. Williams was an inventive creator of dance music, blending reggae and disco on his 1975 track “Music Maker,” and impelling the Miami bass sound as a producer of tracks like “Funky Fresh Beat” by Youth MC’s, released in 1986.

Courtesy of Songfacts

Lyrics

Buffalo Soldier, dreadlock Rasta
There was a Buffalo Soldier
In the heart of America
Stolen from Africa, brought to America
Fighting on arrival, fighting for survival

If you know your history
Then you would know where you coming from
Then you wouldn't have to ask me
Who the heck do I think I am

I'm just a Buffalo Soldier
In the heart of America
Stolen from Africa, brought to America

Said he was fighting on arrival
Fighting for survival
Said he was a Buffalo Soldier
Win the war for America

Said he, woe yoy yoy, woe yoy yoy yoy
Woe yoy yoy yo, yoy yoy yoy yo

Woe yoy yoy, woe yoy yoy yoy
Woe yoy yoy yo, yoy yoy yoy yo

Buffalo Soldier, troddin' through the land woah
Said he wanna ran, then you wanna hand
Troddin' through the land, yeah, yeah

Said he was a Buffalo Soldier
Win the war for America
Buffalo Soldier, dreadlock Rasta
Fighting on arrival, fighting for survival
Driven from the mainland
To the heart of the Caribbean

Singing, woe yoy yoy, woe yoy yoy yoy
Woe yoy yoy yo, yoy yoy yoy yo

Woe yoy yoy, woe yoy yoy yoy
Woe yoy yoy yo, yoy yoy yoy yo


Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Bob Marley / Noel Williams
Buffalo Soldier lyrics © Music Sales Corporation, Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Song Lyric Sunday – If I Ain’t Got You – Alicia Keys

Today’s Song Lyric Sunday challenge, hosted by Jim Adams, is ‘Clive Davis Day’ and we are to find any song that he has produced. On this day of the 64th Annual Grammy Awards, what a perfect time to be looking at the most amazing talent and insight of one of the record industry’s most revered record producers. Davis has been the force behind jump-starting many of the most famous recording artists. (See below). It should be an easy task to find an artist and song that he has produced. My choice is Alicia Keys for the artist and her song ‘If I Ain’t Got You’. A personal favorite of mine.

If you have not yet seen “Clive Davis: The Soundtrack of Our Lives” on Netflix, I encourage you to watch it. His life story and his industry achievements have been quite extraordinary.

The Song

This song was written by Alicia Keys after learning that 22-year-old R&B singer Aaliyah had died in a plane crash in The Bahamas on August 25, 2001. The tragedy inspired this tune; Keys later recalled: “The song idea came together right after Aaliyah passed away. It was such a sad time and no one wanted to believe it. It just made everything crystal clear to me – what matters, and what doesn’t.”

Performers on American IdolThe Voice and other such TV music talent shows have covered the song on countless occasions. Keys reflected to Entertainment Weekly in 2012: ”I have heard a lot of people cover this song. I think that’s actually the biggest compliment for a writer and for an artist, but especially for a writer. It showcases a big range and a powerful emotion, and I never think about it until it’s time to be on tour, and then I’m like, ‘S—! What did I do?’ [Laughs] You gotta make it through two hours, and I’m not lip-synching, so it’s serious.”

Keys won Best Female R&B Vocal Performance for this song at the 2005 Grammy Awards.

Courtesy of Songfacts

Clive Davis

Clive Jay Davis (born April 4, 1932) is an American record producer, A&R executive, music industry executive, and lawyer. He has won five Grammy Awards and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a non-performer, in 2000.

As the record industry’s most innovative, outspoken and influential executive, Clive Davis has had a profound effect on the world of music, acting as both its champion and its critic, and as perhaps its most visible and respected spokesman. Clive Davis’ contributions to music are, to a large extent, responsible for bringing the industry to where it is in the new millennium.

In the first phase of his career, Davis was General Counsel of Columbia Records and was appointed Vice President and General Manager in 1966. In 1967 he was named President of the company. The Monterey Pop Festival in June of 1967 confirmed what Davis had been feeling about rock: the new music was a powerful force, the artistic expression of an emerging culture. He personally signed Janis Joplin’s Big Brother and The Holding Company to Columbia. After that, he was directly responsible for the signing of many more landmark artists in the rock field, among them Blood, Sweat & Tears, Chicago, Santana, Boz Scaggs, Loggins & Messina, Laura Nyro, Billy Joel, Bruce Springsteen, Aerosmith and Earth, Wind and Fire. In addition to bringing this fresh, brand new talent to Columbia, he signed such artists as Neil Diamond, Pink Floyd, Herbie Hancock and The Isley Brothers.

While building the rock roster, Davis was also strengthening the label’s catalog in all fields of recorded music, achieving historic success in the areas of r&b, country, jazz and pop music. He played a key role in the careers of Simon & Garfunkel, Sly & The Family Stone, Bob Dylan, Barbra Streisand and Andy Williams. Davis figured prominently in shaping career turning points for Miles Davis and Herbie Hancock, and he signed Weather Report. Under his aegis, the company made a strong entry into r&b. Davis’ deal with Gamble & Huff brought to the company the famed Philadelphia-International label, which had an enormous string of hits and set the course for black music in the ’70s.

Davis left Columbia Records in May 1973 and, after writing the book, Clive: Inside The Record Business, a national best-seller in both hard cover and paperback, he founded with Columbia Pictures, Arista Records in the fall of 1974. The Arista Records hot streak began immediately. Only three months after the company opened its doors Barry Manilow’s smash hit “Mandy”, found by and named by Davis, went straight to #1.

Under Davis’ leadership, Arista launched the careers of Whitney Houston, Barry Manilow, Patti Smith, Kenny G, Sarah McLachlan, Monica and Dido. The label also attracted such important artists as Aretha Franklin, The Grateful Dead, The Kinks, Lou Reed, Eurythmics, Dionne Warwick, Daryl Hall & John Oates, and Carly Simon.

Arista’s Nashville division, begun in 1988, quickly became the talk of the industry with the discovery of a stellar lineup of stars led by Alan Jackson, Brooks & Dunn, Diamond Rio, Pam Tillis and Brad Paisley. With over 150 major industry awards Arista Nashville set the pace for country music.

Analogous to his agreement with Gamble & Huff in the seventies, Davis made his agreement with L.A. Reid and Babyface to form LaFace Records in October 1989. During this time, LaFace built an outstanding roster of hitmaking artists including TLC, Toni Braxton, Usher, OutKast, and Pink.

In 1994, Davis and producer/entrepreneur Sean “Puffy” Combs entered into a 50/50 joint venture that resulted in the creation of Bad Boy Records with an artist roster that grew to include Notorious B.I.G., Faith Evans, Mase, 112 and of course Puffy Combs. Along with LaFace Records, Bad Boy became the most successful Hip-Hop and Rap label of the ’90s, with a shelf full of Grammy, “Soul Train” and other industry awards. Bad Boy amassed sales of more than 12 million albums in its first three years, including five RIAA platinum and multi-platinum titles and ten RIAA gold.

Throughout the Nineties, Arista staked its place in music history time and time again. Specifically, superstars such as Whitney Houston, Santana, Monica, Sarah McLachlan and Deborah Cox broke records with their long-running chart-topping positions. In fact, Arista carved its niche as the only record label in the Soundscan era (whose tracking began in May 1991) to occupy the top three spots on Billboard’s Hot 100 at one time. This occurred for a five-week period in 1995, when TLC’s “Waterfalls” held strong at #1, while Monica’s “Don’t Take It Personal” and “One More Chance” by Notorious B.I.G. alternated at the second and third position. Arista later staked its claim to the top three positions on Billboard’s Hot R&B chart in February, 1999 with “Heartbreak Hotel” by Whitney Houston, “Angel Of Mine” by Monica and “Nobody’s Supposed To Be Here” by Deborah Cox (which stayed at #1 for a history-making 14 weeks). All three singles were executive produced by Clive Davis.

The 9x Grammy winning album, Supernatural, sold over 26 million copies worldwide, produced the #1 hits “Smooth” and “Maria Maria” (#1 record on Billboard’s Hot 100 Singles for 12 weeks), marked the reunion of Carlos Santana and Clive Davis and the two accepted, as producers, the Grammy for Best Album of The Year.

Also, in 2000, Clive Davis was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as the only non-performer along with other legends such as Eric Clapton, Earth, Wind & Fire and James Taylor. Almost simultaneously, it was announced that the celebrated Arista chief would be the recipient of the Trustees Lifetime Achievement award by NARAS at the Grammy Awards

The landmark year continued when NBC Television broadcast a two hour primetime special saluting Arista Records and Clive Davis entitled “25 Years Of #1 Hits: Arista Records Anniversary Celebration” featuring performances by Santana, Whitney Houston, Aretha Franklin, Toni Braxton, Puff Daddy, Annie Lennox, Sarah McLachlan, Alan Jackson, Barry Manilow, Brooks & Dunn, Kenny G, Patti Smith, Monica, and many others. This once-in-a-lifetime concert special benefited AmFAR, City Of Hope, and T.J. Martell Foundation.

In August 2000, Clive Davis began a new phase in his career, announcing the formation of J Records. The label quickly became the buzz of the industry with platinum success story after success story, beginning with Alicia Keys whose debut album Songs In A Minor sold over 10 million copies and swept the Grammys. Her second album, The Diary of Alicia Keys debuted at #1 and has since sold over 8 million copies worldwide.

J Records has emerged as a dominant music force with chart topping albums by Maroon 5 whose debut album sold over 10 million copies worldwide, Annie Lennox, Luther Vandross and Rod Stewart, whose five Great American Songbook Volumes returned him to the top of the charts selling over 18 million copies worldwide, with all five volumes being co-produced by Davis.

Continue reading at clivedavis.com

The Song

Some people live for the fortune
Some people live just for the fame
Some people live for the power, yeah
Some people live just to play the game

Some people think that the physical things define what's within
And I've been there before, and that life's a bore
So full of the superficial

Some people want it all
But I don't want nothing at all
If it ain't you baby
If I ain't got you baby
Some people want diamond rings
Some just want everything
But everything means nothing
If I ain't got you, yeah

Some people search for a fountain
That promises forever young
Some people need three dozen roses
And that's the only way to prove you love them

Hand me the world on a silver platter
And what good would it be
With no one to share, with no one who truly cares for me

Some people want it all
But I don't want nothing at all
If it ain't you baby
If I ain't got you baby
Some people want diamond rings
Some just want everything
But everything means nothing
If I ain't got you

Some people want it all
But I don't want nothing at all
If it ain't you baby
If I ain't got you baby
Some people want diamond rings
Some just want everything
But everything means nothing
If I ain't got you, yeah

If I ain't got you with me baby
So nothing in this whole wide world don't mean a thing
If I ain't got you with me baby

Written by Alicia Keys

Song Lyric Sunday – Do Ya Think I’m Sexy?

This week’s prompts for Song Lyric Sunday, hosted by Jim Adams, are ‘Mind, Think and Brain’ suggested by Paula of Light Motifs II.

Two songs I thought of immediately I had already previously used in the last few years and I didn’t want to repeat. Then I remembered this old Rod Stewart song that I still like hearing. “Do Ya Think I’m Sexy? I hope you enjoy him at his sexy best!

The Song

Stewart was known for his soulful blues and folk ballads, but this song was a disco departure, and it gave him a new look. He attracted many new fans, but alienated many of his old ones, who had no interest in disco and fondly remembered Rod as a member of The Faces, where he earned a reputation as hard-rocking party animal. Reflecting on the song in the May 1995 issue of Mojo magazine, Stewart said: “I think it’s one of those songs that everyone can remember what they were doing in that particular year. It was one of the 10 songs that summed up that whole dance/disco period. And that’s what music’s about surely, to bring back memories.”

Speaking in Esquire in 2012, he said: “I used to be embarrassed to sing ‘Da Ya Think I’m Sexy,’ but people love it. So it’s in the show.”

Most of the music for this song was written by drummer Carmine Appice, who had recently joined Stewart’s band. Appice told Songfacts: “We were in the studio and ‘Miss You’ by The Rolling Stones was a big hit. Rod was always a guy that used to listen to what was going on around him. He was always looking at the charts and listening. He was a big fan of The Rolling Stones, so when they came out with “Miss You,” disco was really big at the time, so he wanted to do some kind of disco-y song, something like ‘Miss You,’ nothing like Gloria Gaynor.

With the band, he would always tell us, ‘I want a song like this’ or ‘I want a song like that,’ so I went home and I came up with a bunch or chords and a melody. I presented it to him via a friend of mine, Duane Hitchings, who is a songwriter who had a little studio. We went in his studio with his drum machines and his keyboards, and he made my chords sound better. We gave Rod a demo of the verses and the bridge, and Rod came up with the chorus. We played it with the band many, many ways before we got the correct arrangement with Tom Dowd. Unfortunately, they put so much stuff on it that it dwarfed the sound of the band. It made the band sound smaller because it had strings and two or three keyboard players, congas, and drums. When we were doing it, we thought it was going to be more like The Rolling Stones with just the band playing it. It came out and went to #1 everywhere.”

The distinctive riff came from an instrumental song called “Taj Mahal” by a Brazilian musician named Jorge Ben. When Ben filed suit, Stewart agreed to give proceeds from the song to UNICEF. He later recalled in his book, Rod: The Autobiography: “I held my hand up straight away. Not that I’d stood in the studio and said, ‘Here, I know: we’ll use that tune from Taj Mahal as the chorus. The writer lives in Brazil, so he’ll never find out.’ Clearly the melody had lodged itself in my memory and then resurfaced. Unconscious plagiarism, plain and simple.”

There is a blues guitarist named Taj Mahal who made his own version of the song using this same riff. The title, and also the only lyrics in the song, is “Jorge Ben.”

Courtesy of Songfacts

The Lyrics

Sugar, sugar
She sits alone waiting for suggestions
He's so nervous avoiding all the questions
His lips are dry, her heart is gently pounding
Don't you just know exactly what they're thinking

If you want my body and you think I'm sexy
Come on sugar let me know.
If you really need me just reach out and touch me
Come on honey tell me so
Tell me so baby

He's acting shy looking for an answer
Come on honey let's spend the night together
Now hold on a minute before we go much further
Give me a dime so I can phone my mother
They catch a cab to his high rise apartment
At last he can tell her exactly what his heart meant

If you want my body and you think I'm sexy
Come on honey tell me so
If you really need me just reach out and touch me
Come on sugar let me know

His heart's beating like a drum
Cause at last he's got this girl home
Relax baby now we are alone

They wake at dawn ''cause all the birds are singing
Two total strangers but that ain't what they're thinking
Outside it's cold, misty and it's raining
They got each other neither one's complaining
He say's I sorry but I'm out of milk and coffee
Never mind sugar we can watch the early movie

If you want my body and you think I'm sexy
Come on sugar let me know
If you really need me just reach out and touch me
Come on honey tell me so

If you really need me just reach out and touch me
Come on sugar let me know
If you really, really, really, really need me
Just let me know
Just reach out and touch me
If you really want me
Just reach out and touch me
Come on sugar let me know
If you really need me just reach out and touch me
Come on sugar let me know
If you, if you, if you really need me
Just come on and tell me so

Writer(s): Duane S Hitchings, Roderick David Stewart, Carmine Appice 
%d bloggers like this: