Tag: Allegory

Muse

Muse

Beauty surrounding me
Bringing peace and harmony
Mesmerized by the silence
I’m embraced by your charm
As if protected from harm
I float in your abeyance

Becoming your muse
Your palette of hues
Will paint my life story
With each brush stroke
Oh, the fantasies you invoke
Together we write the allegory

Our existence is enthralling
I feel my body trembling
Ignited with your desire
I can surmount the highest peak
Where the view resplendent
and live life as if on fire

The dramas of the day
Suddenly melt away
Comfort in your positive energy
Strength from your open arms
Soothing my never ending qualms
A perfect synergy

Without you I would be lost
Stay with me at all costs
We are bound together forever
Filling my soul with elation
You are my salvation
I will go with you wherever

Christine Bolton – Poetry for Healing ©

Prompts:

Enthralling

Inspire

Surmount

Resplendent

Photo by Craig Ren on Unsplash

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Looking For The Other Half

The Word of The Day Challenge for June 17 is Moiety. Admittedly I had to look this one up, but I’m thankful to learn its meaning.  It’s definition according to Merriman-Webster’s dictionary is “Moiety: one of two equal parts – Half” It reminded me of a Plato allegory that I discovered some years ago and instantly loved. It’s a beautiful story and worth the read. Here is a brief synopsis of the lengthy document I found on theconversation.com with some links to the Symposium if you are interested.

“In the beginning, humans were androgynous. So says Aristophanes in his fantastical account of the origins of love in Plato’s Symposium. Not only did early humans have both sets of sexual organs, Aristophanes reports, but they were outfitted with two faces, four hands, and four legs. These monstrosities were very fast – moving by way of cartwheels – and they were also quite powerful. So powerful, in fact, that the gods were nervous for their dominion. Wanting to weaken the humans, Zeus, Greek king of Gods, decided to cut each in two, and commanded his son Apollo “to turn its face…towards the wound so that each person would see that he’d been cut and keep better order.” If, however, the humans continued to pose a threat, Zeus promised to cut them again – “and they’ll have to make their way on one leg, hopping!” The severed humans were  a miserable lot, Aristophanes says. “[Each] one longed for its other half, and so they would throw their arms about each other, weaving themselves together, wanting to grow together.” Finally, Zeus, moved by pity, decided to turn their sexual organs to the front, so they might achieve some satisfaction in embracing.”

I find this story very romantic.  For those of us who believe in soulmates and two halves making a whole, this allegory would seem to confirm our thoughts.  I found it buried in a self-help relationship book that someone had recommended to me.  I felt better instantly because I always had an indescribable feeling my whole life that something was missing.  As if I were limping through life with only one leg. For fear of sounding dramatic, the book, and Plato’s allegory, changed my way of thinking about life and the universe.  We waste too much time searching for the wrong things and not realizing that it is us who hinder our own progress.   I hope you enjoyed this. Christine Bolton Word of the day Challenge: Moiety Follow Poetry For Healing on WordPress.com

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