Tag: George Harrison

Song Lyric Sunday – This Boy, The Beatles

Today we have been given the prompts This, That and Other for his week’s Song Lyric Sunday challenge. Our host, Jim Adams, is giving a nod to our friend, Fandango, from the blog This, That and the Other. For the last three-plus years Fandango, not his real name, has given us a daily prompt word to tickle our muses and get us writing, along with Flash Fiction challenges, Provocative Questions and Who Won The Week? A big thank you from your fellow bloggers!

This SLS challenge was a little more difficult than I thought it would be. I found a few songs that fit but I wasn’t that thrilled with them. In the end I went with a very pretty song with great harmonies, This Boy, by the Beatles.

The second video is short and sweet. George Harrison is observing and commenting on another video of The Beatles singing this song. He pokes a little fun and it’s quite funny. I hope you enjoy it.

The Song

John Lennon wrote this song. One of his early compositions, it is seemingly simple, but very clever. The song contains only a few notes, but the space between the notes is filled by the arrangements. It’s the same technique you hear in Liszt’s “Liebestraum,” the piano piece in Schumann’s Davidsbündlertänze and in Beethoven’s “Moonlight Sonata.”

This was the first Beatles composition that was commented on by a music critic. William Mann wrote in The London Times December 27, 1963, that the song had “pendiatonic clusters.”

George Harrison: “It was John (Lennon) trying to do Smokey (Robinson).”

The vocals were a three part harmony sung by Harrison, Lennon and McCartney.

The Beatles performed this on their second Ed Sullivan Show appearance – Feb 16, 1964. They played six songs on the show that night, and this provided a slow change of pace from the uptempo songs like “She Loves You” and “I Want To Hold Your Hand.” The Beatles were just beginning their breakthrough in America and got a huge audience from the show.

This was used in Ringo’s big scene in The Beatles movie A Hard Day’s Night. The version used in the film is an instrumental renamed “Ringo’s Theme (This Boy),” and without any harmony singing.

This was one of the first songs on which The Beatles used a 4-track recorder.

Artists to cover this song include Tom Baxter, David Bowie, Sean Lennon, George Martin, Delbert McClinton and The Nylons.

The Lyrics

That boy
Took my love away
Though he'll regret it someday
But this boy wants you back again

That boy
Isn't good for you
Though he may want you, too
This boy wants you back again

Oh, and this boy would be happy 
Just to love you, but oh my 
That boy won't be happy
'Til he's seen you cry

This boy
Wouldn't mind the pain
Would always feel the same
If this boy gets you back again

This boy, this boy, this boy
Writer/s: John Lennon, Paul McCartney
 
Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, BMG Rights Management,
Songtrust Ave, Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd.
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Courtesy of Songfacts

Song Lyric Sunday – My Sweet Lord

The prompts for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday are Delightful, Pleasant and Sweet suggested by our friend Paula from Light Motifs. It wouldn’t surprise me if we have some repeats again this week as there are a lot of songs with the word ’Sweet’ in the title. I was spoilt for choice but I have picked a favorite, ”My Sweet Lord” by George Harrison. I will never get tired of hearing it. There is a lot of history behind this song so I hope you enjoy reading about it too.

The Song

This was Harrison’s first single as a solo artist, and it was his biggest hit. The song is about the Eastern religions he was studying.

Highly unusual for a hit song, Harrison repeats part of a Hindu mantra in the lyric when he sings, “Hare Krishna… Krishna, Krishna.” When set to music, this mantra is typically part of a chant that acts as a call to the Lord. Harrison interposes it with a Christian call to faith: “Hallelujah” – he was pointing out that “Hallelujah and Hare Krishna are quite the same thing.”

In the documentary The Material World, Harrison explains: “First, it’s simple. The thing about a mantra, you see… mantras are, well, they call it a mystical sound vibration encased in a syllable. It has this power within it. It’s just hypnotic.”


In 1971, Bright Tunes Music sued Harrison because this sounded too much like the 1963 Chiffons hit “He’s So Fine.” Bright Tunes was controlled by The Tokens, who set it up when they formed the production company that recorded “He’s So Fine” – they owned the publishing rights to the song.

During the convoluted court case, Harrison explained how he composed the song: He said that in December 1969, he was playing a show in Copenhagen, Denmark, with the group Delaney and Bonnie, whose piano player was Billy Preston (who contributed to some Beatles recordings). Harrison said that he started writing the song after a press conference when he slipped away and started playing some guitar chords around the words “Hallelujah” and “Hare Krishna.” He then brought the song to the band, who helped him work it out as he came up with lyrics. When he returned to London, Harrison worked on Billy Preston’s album Encouraging Words. They recorded the song for the album, which was released on Apple Records later in 1970, and Harrison filed a copyright application for the melody, words and harmony of the song. Preston’s version remained an album cut, and it was Harrison’s single that was the huge hit and provoked the lawsuit, which was filed on February 10, 1971, while the song was still on the chart.

In further testimony, Harrison claimed he got the idea for “My Sweet Lord” from The Edwin Hawkins Singers’ “Oh Happy Day,” not “He’s So Fine.”

When the case was filed, Harrison’s manager was Allen Klein, who negotiated with Bright Tunes on his behalf. The case was delayed when Bright Tunes went into receivership, and was not heard until 1976. In the meantime, Harrison and Klein parted ways in bitter fashion, and Klein began consulting Bright Tunes. Harrison offered to settle the case for $148,000 in January 1976, but the offer was rejected and the case brought to court.

The trial took place February 23-25, with various expert witnesses testifying. The key to the case was the musical pattern of the two songs, which were both based on two musical motifs: “G-E-D” and “G-A-C-A-C.” “He’s So Fine” repeated both motifs four times, “My Sweet Lord” repeated the first motif four times and the second motif three times. Harrison couldn’t identify any other songs that used this exact pattern, and the court ruled that “the two songs are virtually identical.” And while the judge felt that Harrison did not intentionally copy “My Sweet Lord,” that was not a defense – thus Harrison was on the hook writing a similar song without knowing it. Harrison was found guilty of “subconscious plagiarism” in a verdict handed down on August 31, 1976.

Assessing damages in the case, the judge determined that “My Sweet Lord” represented 70% of the airplay of the All Things Must Pass album, and came up with a total award of about $1.6 million. However, in 1978 Allen Klein’s company ABKCO purchased Bright Tunes for $587,000, which prompted Harrison to sue. In 1981, a judge decided that Klein should not profit from the judgment, and was entitled to only the $587,000 he paid for the company – all further proceeds from the case had to be remitted back to Harrison. The case dragged on until at least 1993, when various administrative matters were finally settled.

The case was a burden for Harrison, who says he tried to settle but kept getting dragged back to court by Bright Tunes. After losing the lawsuit, he became more disenfranchised with the music industry, and took some time off from recording – after his 1976 album Thirty Three & 1/3, he didn’t release another until his self-titled album in 1979. He told Rolling Stone, “It’s difficult to just start writing again after you’ve been through that. Even now when I put the radio on, every tune I hear sounds like something else.”

This was recorded at Abbey Road studios using the same equipment The Beatles used. There were some familiar faces at the sessions who had contributed to Beatles albums, including John Lennon, Yoko Ono, Billy Preston and Eric Clapton. Bobby Whitlock was friends with Harrison and Clapton, and played keyboards on the album. When Songfacts spoke with Whitlock, he shared his thoughts:

“That whole session was great. George Harrison, what a wonderful man. All the time that I ever knew him, which was from 1969 to his passing, he was a wonderful man. He included everyone on everything he did because there was enough for all.”

Whitlock adds, “All during the sessions, the door would pop open and in would spring three or four or five Hare Krishnas in their white robes and shaved heads with a pony tail coming out the top. They were all painted up, throwing rose petals and distributing peanut butter cookies.”

This was the first #1 hit for any Beatle after the band broke up. Harrison became the first Beatle to release a solo album when he issued Wonderwall Music, the soundtrack to the movie Wonderwall, in 1968.

When this song was released, the phrase “Hare Krishna” was associated with a religious group called the International Society for Krishna Consciousness, whose members would often approach passengers in airports, seeking donations and trying to solicit members. Individuals in this group became popularly known as “Hare Krishnas,” with a generally negative connotation.

The Lyrics

My sweet Lord
Mm, my Lord
Mm, my Lord

I really want to see you
Really want to be with you
Really want to see you, Lord
But it takes so long, my Lord

My sweet Lord
Mm, my Lord
Mm, my Lord

I really want to know you
Really want to go with you
Really want to show you, Lord
That it won't take long, my Lord

(Hallelujah)
My sweet Lord
(Hallelujah)
Mm my Lord
(Hallelujah)
My sweet Lord
(Hallelujah)

Really wanna see you
Really wanna see you
Really wanna see you, Lord
Really wanna see you, Lord
But it takes so long, my Lord

(Hallelujah)
My sweet Lord
(Hallelujah)
Mm, my Lord
(Hallelujah)
My my my Lord
(Hallelujah)

I really wanna know you
(Hallelujah)
Really wanna go with you
(Hallelujah)
Really wanna show you, Lord
That it won't take long, my Lord
(Hallelujah)

Mmm
(Hallelujah)
My sweet Lord
(Hallelujah)
My my Lord
(Hallelujah)

Mmm my Lord
(Hare Krishna)
My my my Lord
(Hare Krishna)
Oh my sweet Lord
(Krishna, Krishna)
Oohh
(Hare Hare)
Now I really wanna see you
(Hare Rama)
Really wanna be with you
(Hare Rama)
Really wanna see you, Lord
But it takes so long, my Lord
(Hallelujah)
Mmmm my Lord
(Hallelujah)
My my my Lord
(Hare Krishna)
My sweet Lord
(Hare Krishna)
My sweet Lord
(Krishna, Krishna)
My Lord
(Hare Hare)
Mmmm
(Gurur Brahma)
Mmmm
(Gurur Vishnu)
Mmmm
(Gurur Devo)
Mmmm
(Maheshwara)
My sweet Lord
(Gurur Sakshaat)
My sweet Lord
(Parabrahma)
My, my my Lord
(Tasmayi Shree)
My, my my my Lord
(Guruve Namah)
My sweet Lord
(Hare Rama)
(Hare Krishna)
My sweet Lord
(Hare Krishna)
My sweet Lord
(Krishna Krishna)

Writer/s: George Harrison 
Publisher: CONCORD and MUSIC PUBLISHING LLC, DistroKid
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Courtesy of Songfacts
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