Tag: Lyrics

Song Lyric Sunday – Happiness is a Warm Gun

The prompts for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday, hosted by our friend, Jim Adams, are Bomb, Gun, Knife and Weapon. I have chosen probably something that will get multiple picks today. Happiness is a Warm Gun. In my opinion Lennon’s version is incredible, but I have chosen to use the one from the movie, ‘Across the Universe’ as the video clip is amazing. I really enjoyed this movie and if you haven’t seen it, and if you’re a Beatles fan, it’s must!

The Song


The title came from an article in The American Rifleman, a magazine published by the National Rifle Association. The story was titled “Happiness Is A Warm Gun.” In it, the author recalls the special time when he took his 7-year-old son shooting for the first time. It struck John Lennon as “fantastic, insane… a warm gun means you’ve just shot something.” Said Lennon, “I thought it was so crazy that I made a song out of it.”

This complicated song, which involved various different time signatures, (the 6/8 middle section was made more convoluted by Ringo continuing to drum in 4/4), took 15 hours and over 100 takes to nail. The first half of one take was combined with the second half of another to form the complete song.

Like the composer Wagner, Lennon felt that a song must have increasing excitement, climax and redemption. The song is built from pieces of several different little songs, with different melodies and rhythms, and one after another, the excitement is increasing. The climax is the falsetto, and finally the redemption is in the continuing call and answer.

When The White Album was released in 1968, it was not commonly known that Lennon was a composer, as many people thought that he was only a lyric writer. After The Beatles broke up, their individual songwriting contributions were revealed in greater detail. 

Lennon said of this song: “It’s sort of a history of rock ‘n’ roll.” Much of the imagery in the lyrics is about his sexual passion for Yoko.

Lennon considered this one of his favorites. It’s also Paul McCartney’s favorite song on The White Album.

In the last section of the song, the backing vocals are “Bang, Bang, Shoot, Shoot.”

A popular theory is that Lennon meant for this to be a drug metaphor for doing heroin:

“Needing a fix”

“Jump the gun” – meaning to cook it up

“Bang, Bang, SHOOT, SHOOT”

“When I hold you in my arm, nobody can do me no harm” – heroin addicts tell how when you’re on it, nothing can do you no harm and Lennon’s overall nature seem to point to this >>

This was banned by the BBC for sexual symbolism. They thought the gun was a phallic symbol.

The original line “When I hold you in my arms and feel my finger on your trigger…” appears in unreleased, bootlegged versions of “I’m So Tired” as “When I hold you in your arms, when you show me each one of your charms, I wonder should I get up, and go to the funny farm.” This could mean the line was originally sexual but was put in as a metaphor for a gun later on. 

The final doo-wop chorus of this song has the exact same chord progression as “This Boy,” just in a different key.

The phrase “happiness is a warm gun” is a play on a Peanuts comic strip from 1960 where Lucy hugs Snoopy and says, “Happiness is a warm puppy.” That phrase became a popular slogan, appearing on mugs, T-shirts and lots of other merch.

Tori Amos covered this on her 2001 album Strange Little Girls. All the songs on the album were written by men – Amos took on different characters to interpret them from a woman’s point of view. Yoko Ono had to approve this, and she did.

The Breeders covered this on their 1990 album Pod.

This is the song that inspired 2Pac to cast his gun as his girlfriend in “Me and My Girlfriend”: “She’s the only woman I need!” 

The Lyrics

She's not a girl who misses much
Do do do do do do, oh yeah
She's well-acquainted with the touch of the velvet hand
Like a lizard on a window pane
The man in the crowd with the multicolored mirrors
On his hobnail boots
Lying with his eyes while his hands are busy
Working overtime
A soap impression of his wife which he ate
And donated to the National Trust

I need a fix 'cause I'm going down
Down to the pits that I left uptown
I need a fix 'cause I'm going down

Mother Superior jumped the gun
Mother Superior jumped the gun
Mother Superior jumped the gun
Mother Superior jumped the gun
Mother Superior jumped the gun
Mother Superior jumped the gun

Happiness is a warm gun (bang, bang, shoot, shoot)
Happiness is a warm gun, momma (bang, bang, shoot, shoot)

When I hold you in my arms (ooh, oh, yeah)
And I feel my finger on your trigger (ooh, oh, yeah)
I know nobody can do me no harm (ooh, oh, yeah)
Because

(Happiness) is a warm gun momma (bang, bang, shoot, shoot)
Happiness is a warm gun, yes it is (bang, bang, shoot, shoot)
Happiness is a warm, yes it is, gun (happiness, bang, bang, shoot, shoot)
Well, don't you know that happiness is a warm gun momma?
(Happiness is a warm gun, yeah)

Writer/s: John Lennon, Paul McCartney 
Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Courtesy of Songfacts

Song Lyric Sunday – Disturbia

The prompts for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday, hosted by Jim Adams, are Concern, Fear, Fret and Worry, courtesy of our friend Fandango from the blog This, That and The Other.

I have selected Disturbia by Rihanna.

The Song

This dance/pop track about being in a state of mental anguish was co-written by Rihanna’s boyfriend at the time Chris Brown, who also contributed backing vocals. The other co-writers were Andre Merritt and Robert Allen who together with Brown comprise his songwriting team, the Graffiti Artists. The trio also penned Brown’s hit “Forever.”

This was produced by Brian Kennedy who has also worked with Ciara (“My Love”), Jesse McCartney (“Runnin'”) and Menudo (“Inside Out”).

The video for this song was directed by acclaimed fashion photographer David LaChapelle. Among the other videos he has directed include “Dirrty,” “I’m With You” and “The Voice Within” all by Christina Aguilera.

This entered the Hot 100 at #18, the first single by the Barbadian singer to debut in the top half of the chart.

This dance-pop song was Rihanna’s fourth #1 hit on the Hot 100. It also topped the singles charts in a number of other countries, including Belgium, New Zealand and Turkey.

L.A. Reid – the head of Rihanna’s record company Def Jam, told MTV News that with this song, the Barbadian singer was taking control of her career. He explained that when Def Jam repackaged Rihanna’s Good Girl Gone Bad, the second single from the repackage was this song. Reid added: “It was the first time that Rihanna actually came to me and said, ‘Here’s the song I want to put out.’ She played me the song. That was her taking control, even on her last album. She understands what hits are, and she knows what she wants to say. She’s at that place where she can do it.”

The Lyrics

Bum bum be-dum bum bum be-dum bum
Bum bum be-dum bum bum be-dum bum
Bum bum be-dum bum bum be-dum bum
Bum bum be-dum bum bum be-dum bum

No more gas in the red
Can't even get it started
Nothing heard, nothing said
Can't even speak about it
All my life on my head
Don't want to think about it
Feels like I'm going insane
Yeah

It's a thief in the night
To come and grab you
It can creep up inside you
And consume you
A disease of the mind
It can control you
It's too close for comfort

Throw on your break lights
We're in the city of wonder
Ain't gonna play nice
Watch out, you might just go under
Better think twice
Your train of thought will be altered
So if you must falter be wise
Your mind is in Disturbia
It's like the darkness is the light
Disturbia
Am I scaring you tonight
Your mind is in Disturbia
Ain't used to what you like
Disturbia
Disturbia

Bum bum be-dum bum bum be-dum bum
Bum bum be-dum bum bum be-dum bum
Bum bum be-dum bum bum be-dum bum
Bum bum be-dum bum bum be-dum bum

Faded pictures on the wall
It's like they talkin' to me
Disconnectin' your call
Your phone don't even ring
I gotta get out
Or figure this shit out
It's too close for comfort

It's a thief in the night
To come and grab you
It can creep up inside you
And consume you
A disease of the mind
It can control you
I feel like a monster

Throw on your break lights
We're in the city of wonder
Ain't gonna play nice
Watch out, you might just go under
Better think twice
Your train of thought will be altered
So if you must falter be wise
Your mind is in Disturbia
It's like the darkness is the light
Disturbia
Am I scaring you tonight
Your mind is in Disturbia
Ain't used to what you like
Disturbia
Disturbia

Bum bum be-dum bum bum be-dum bum
Bum bum be-dum bum bum be-dum bum
Bum bum be-dum bum bum be-dum bum
Bum bum be-dum bum bum be-dum bum

Release me from this curse I'm in
I've been trying to maintain
But I'm struggling
You can't go, go, go
I think I'm going to oh, oh, oh

Throw on your break lights
We're in the city of wonder
Ain't gonna play nice
Watch out, you might just go under
Better think twice
Your train of thought will be altered
So if you must falter be wise
Your mind is in Disturbia
It's like the darkness is the light
Disturbia
Am I scaring you tonight
Your mind is in Disturbia
Ain't used to what you like
Disturbia
Disturbia

Bum bum be-dum bum bum be-dum bum
Bum bum be-dum bum bum be-dum bum
Bum bum be-dum bum bum be-dum bum
Bum bum be-dum bum bum be-dum bum
Writer/s: Brian Kennedy Seals, Christopher Maurice Brown, Andre Darrell Merritt, Robert L. Allen 
Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Universal Music Publishing Group, BMG Rights Management, Songtrust Ave

Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Courtesy of Songfacts

Song Lyric Sunday – The Show Must Go On

The guest prompter for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday is Melanie from Sparks From A Combustible Mind and she has given us Entertainment, Circus and Show. My mind went immediately to my Queen index and sure enough there was the perfect song. The Show Must Go On. It is a wonderful song written towards the end of Freddie Mercury’s life. I hope you enjoy it along with the video which is patchwork quilt of wonderful performances by Freddie and Queen along with humorous clips.

The Song

Guitarist Brian May wrote this while lead singer Freddie Mercury was dying of AIDS. It was Mercury’s last official album with Queen, and when it was released, very few people knew he had the disease.

The lyrics are about the need to press on and make the most out of life while you can still enjoy it. It is inevitably a comment on Mercury’s worsening condition, and his attitude towards life – May noted his incredible courage in the Days of our Lives documentary. “He never moaned, he never said ‘my life is s–t, this is terrible, I hate it,'” said May. “He had an incredible strength and peace.”

The song’s placing as the final track on Innuendo is notable, as it’s likely that the band thought that this might be the last album Mercury would be healthy enough to perform on before his death. In the sessions, he made enough recordings to provide the band with material to release the posthumous 1995 album Made In Heaven.

This was used in the movie Moulin Rouge. It is performed in an operatic style by Jim Broadbent and Nicole Kidman in a scene that sets up the climax of the movie.

In a 2005 poll by digital TV channel Music Choice where 45,000 adults across Europe were asked which song they would like played at their funeral, this was the favorite.

The video is mainly just clips of old Queen videos and a few live performances, but it is so cleverly edited and spliced together that it works as a video of it’s own.

This song was performed in dramatic style in 1997 with Elton John on guest vocals with an Italian ballet troupe. It would be John Deacon’s last performance with the band, and last public appearance – he retired from music after the performance.

The Lyrics

Empty spaces, what are we living for?
Abandoned places, I guess we know the score
On and on, does anybody know what we are looking for?
Another hero, another mindless crime
Behind the curtain, in the pantomime
Hold the line, does anybody want to take it anymore?

The show must go on
The show must go on
Yeah
Inside my heart is breaking
My make-up may be flaking
But my smile still stays on

Whatever happens, I'll leave it all to chance
Another heartache, another failed romance
On and on, does anybody know what we are living for?
I guess I'm learning (I'm learning), I must be warmer now
I'll soon be turning (turning, turning, turning), 'round the corner now
Outside the dawn is breaking
But inside in the dark I'm aching to be free

The show must go on
The show must go on (yeah yeah)
Ooh, inside my heart is breaking
My make-up may be flaking
But my smile still stays on

Yeah

My soul is painted like the wings of butterflies
Fairy tales of yesterday will grow but never die
I can fly my friends

The show must go on, yeah
The show must go on
I'll face it with a grin
I'm never giving in
On with the show 

Ooh, I'll top the bill, I'll overkill
I have to find the will to carry on 
(On with the show, on with the show)

Show (show must go on, go on, go on, go on, go on, go on, go on)
Writer/s: Roger Taylor, John Deacon, Brian May, Freddie Mercury 
Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, BMG Rights Management

Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Courtesy of Songfacts

Song Lyric Sunday – I Need You Now

For another week our friend Amy Braun from the blog ai love music – Aisasami – has given us the prompts for today’s Song Lyric Sunday. They are, Electronic communication devices (pagers, iPhone, Android, fax machine, computer, TV). My choice of song that fits the prompt is ‘Need You Know’ by the band Lady A, previously known as Lady Antebellum. Thankfully they dropped the word Antebellum from their name in the summer of 2020 when racial tensions were again on the rise in the US following the death of George Floyd. The word Antebellum has an association with slavery.

The song is about a telephone call made late at night to a former lover. Very relatable to many of us I am sure. I mean, haven’t you ever made a drunk phone call to an ex lover at 1:00 am? I know I have!

I hope you enjoy it. Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to all of you.

The Song

This is the first single and title track from country trio Lady A’s sophomore album, Need You Now. (they were known at the time as Lady Antebellum, a name they changed in 2020 to avoid the association with slavery – “antebellum” refers to the pre-Civil War period in America). Group members Dave Haywood, Charles Kelley and Hillary Scott, along with co-writer Josh Kear, wrote this song about yearning for companionship in the middle of the night. Scott explained that the song, and many others on the album, “Are about what we are learning as we go through the ups and downs of different relationships.” She added: “All three of us know what it’s like to get to that point where you feel lonely enough that you make a late night phone call that you very well could regret the next day. But you do it anyway because it’s the only thing that’s going to give you any relief in that moment.”

Josh Kear explained how quickly the song was written during the pre-telecast segment of the Grammy awards. “Actually, it was the second song we wrote that day,” he said. “We were only together for two-and-a-half hours. We finished the first one in the first 45 minutes. Charles had a guitar thing and an opening line for a song and we wrote ‘Need You Now’ really fast and went, ‘great, that was fun.’ It was the first day I’d ever spent with them. They went their separate ways: it was Charles wife’s birthday, I went home to my wife. Next thing you know it, it’s on the record, title track, first single and here we are. It was actually the very last song they played for the label for deciding what songs were going to put on the album.”
This was Lady A’s second #1 on the Country chart. “I Run To You” topped the chart four months previously.

This song was the first by a country group to reach the Hot 100’s Top 10 for over two and a half years. The previous one to do so was Dixie Chicks’ “Not Ready To Make Nice,” which reached #4 in March 2007.
Charles Kelley told AOL’s The Boot about the day the Lady A trio along with Josh Kear penned this song: “I had a writing appointment with Josh Kear, Dave and Hillary, and my wife didn’t want me to write that day, because it was her birthday. She was so upset that I was going to keep my writing appointment. We already had another song halfway done, so we finished that first. Then Josh asked what else we had. So we actually wrote two songs that day. I’d been fooling around with this little guitar melody at home and had that first line, ‘Picture perfect memories scattered all around the floor.’ But I didn’t have a chorus melody. I played what I had for Josh, and everybody liked it, so we just started writing. Everybody brought in a little piece of that song after I started playing some of the basic chords. But I’m not that great of a guitar player, so I put the guitar back in Dave’s hands. And with his expert knowledge, he just took it to the next level. That’s the beautiful thing about co-writing.

I had that little piece of melody, but I told Hillary it would probably be a more beautiful melody if she sang it. A lot of times you’ll be mumbling things when you’re writing, and something like that first line will come out… and then you’ll immediately put yourself in that place. You may not be going through that in the moment, but you’re able to put yourself in one of those times you were going through something like that. That’s kind of how the three of us write together. We’ll sit there and come up with some melodies, and Hillary and myself will be mumbling words over it… and then something will happen. We’ll say something, and we’ll start writing a song around it. After we had the chorus, we started toying with the idea — what if now, from a man’s perspective, he comes in and says his part? We were a little worried though, about that one line: ‘It’s a quarter after one, and I’m a little drunk’… We were wondering if it was OK to say that! It was one of those songs that came together really quickly. But truthfully, I don’t think we really knew what we had when we walked out of there that day! We thought we’d just written a couple of good songs.”

The Need You Now album debuted at #1 on the Billboard 200 albums chart, selling 481,000 copies, the biggest opening week for an album released in January since the Game’s The Documentary bowed with 587,000 in 2005. It was also best debut sales week for a country album since Taylor Swift’s Fearless opened at #1 with 592,000 copies in November 2008.

Need You Now spent four weeks on top of the album chart, making it the equal longest-reigning album by a core country group in the Billboard 200’s history, matching the four-week reign of Dixie Chicks’ Home in 2002-03.

This won both Single of the Year and Song of the Year at the 2010 ACM Awards. The trio also won Vocal Group of the Year at the same ceremony.\

Lady A performed “Need You Now” at the 2010 Grammy Awards, where it won for Record of the Year and Song of the Year. It marked just the second time a country song won the Record of the Year prize and the third time Song of the Year went Country. The Dixie Chicks’ “Not Ready To Make Nice” also won both awards at the 2007 ceremonies, and Willie Nelson’s “Always On My Mind” was honored with Song of the Year in 1983.

British singer-songwriter Adele recorded a cover version of this tune with Darius Rucker live at CMT’s 2010 Artists of the Year Awards. The track was made available in a Target stores-exclusive version of Adele’s album 21

It was announced on April 7, 2011 that this had become the most downloaded country song ever, overtaking Taylor Swift’s “Love Story.”

The Lyrics

Picture perfect memories,
Scattered all around the floor,
Reaching for the phone cause, I can't fight it any more
And I wonder if I ever cross your mind
For me it happens all the time

It's a quarter after one, I'm all alone and I need you now
Said I wouldn't call but I lost all control and I need you now
And I don't know how I can do without, I just need you now

Another shot of whiskey, can't stop looking at the door
Wishing you'd come sweepin' in the way you did before
And I wonder if I ever cross your mind
For me it happens all the time

It's a quarter after one, I'm a little drunk, and I need you now
Said I wouldn't call but I lost all control and I need you now
And I don't know how I can do without, I just need you now

Guess I'd rather hurt than feel nothing at all
It's a quarter after one, I'm all alone and I need you now
And I said I wouldn't call but I'm a little drunk and I need you now
And I don't know how I can do without, I just need you now
I just need you now

Oh baby I need you now

Writer/s: Joshua Kear, Hillary Scott, Dave Haywood, Charles Kelley 
Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Warner Chappell Music, Inc.,
Round Hill Music Big Loud Songs
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind


Song Lyric Sunday – Radio Ga Ga – No Nonsense

Our friend Amy Braun, from the blog ailovemusic, has provided the prompt for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday, hosted by Jim Adams, and it’s a good one. She has asked us to find a song with nonsense lyrics. I was stumped at first and then I got to thinking about it and remembered one of my favorite songs, Radio Ga Ga by Queen. To me it never seemed like nonsense lyrics. I mean, really, whoever cared about the lyrics to rock songs? it was all about the music and who doesn’t remember the great Freddie Mercury’s performance at the Live Aid concert at Wembley Stadium?

The Song

Queen drummer Roger Taylor wrote this song. When it charted, all four members of the group had written at least one Top 10 hit either in the US or UK.

Roger Taylor wrote this as a critique of radio stations, which were becoming commercialized and playing the same songs over and over (and this was before radio was deregulated, allowing companies to own multiple stations in a market, resulting in more corporate ownership, less competition and generally bad radio).

Taylor claimed that he was inspired to write this after watching MTV. He noticed that lots of kids were watching the channel instead of listening to the radio.

The video is based on the 1926 movie Metropolis, directed by Fritz Lang. Queen had to pay the German government to use clips of it in the video.

Originally, this was “Radio Ca-Ca,” which was something Roger Taylor’s part-French son Felix exclaimed one day in trying to say the radio was bad (“radio, CACA!). The phrase stuck with Taylor and inspired the anti-commercial radio themes in the lyrics.

Taylor liked the title, but the rest of the group objected and asked for a re-write. As a result, it went from a song condemning radio (“Ca-Ca”) to praising it (“Ga Ga”). Interestingly however, even in the final recorded version, the phrase “Ca-Ca” is present – maybe as a compromise for Taylor?

Queen stole the show at Live-Aid when Freddie Mercury, battling laryngitis, got everybody in Wembley Stadium singing the chorus of this song.

The extras in the video got the clapping sequence right on the first try, but it took practice for the members of Queen to get it down. Director David Mallet was surprised the extras picked up the routine so easily, considering they’d never heard the song, which hadn’t yet been released.

The rock band Electric Six recorded this on their 2005 album Señor Smoke. In the video, their lead singer Dick Valentine is shown as the ghost of Freddie Mercury appearing in front of his grave, which caused controversy amongst Queen fans. Valentine was quick to stress that it was meant in tribute, not to denigrate the group – the band were massive Queen fans.

Lady Gaga took her name from this song. Born Stefani Germanotta, she started using the moniker when she needed a stage name. Who came up with the name is a matter of dispute, as her former producer Rob Fusari claims that he originated it, while the singer says it was given to her by her co-workers in her burlesque days.

When director David Mallet was coming up with the concept for the music video, he wanted to stray from the usual performance pieces full of guitar solos and drum fills. “And even [guitarist] Brian May agreed to that,” Mallet told the documentary series Video Killed the Radio Star. Freddie Mercury suggested the Metropolis concept, but Mallet wanted to make sure the band still played a key role in the clip. “So we built that funny car and them flying through the air, and used the wide shots from Metropolis … All I was trying to do is find some way of fitting Metropolis into a different setting, and I thought, what if we make the whole video a period – wartime, for instance, or semi-wartime, and it would tie it all together. And it did.”

Some critics feel the choreography in the hand-clapping scene is a reference to Nazis, an idea that Mallet dismisses: “It didn’t really have any bearing on Nazi rallies at all.” Roger Taylor added: “That section was meant to sort of portray the mind control of the workers in the movie Metropolis.”

An extended version was released as a 12″ single at the same time.

Fun Facts

  • Freddie Mercury was born in Zanzibar, went to boarding school in India, and came to England with his parents in 1964. His birth name is Farrokh Bulsara, but due to racial abuse he suffered in his early teens, he legally changed his name in 1972.
  • Mercury died of AIDS the day after announcing he had the disease. He died the morning of November 24, 1991 at age 45.
  • May is an accomplished scholar. He studied astronomy and physics at Imperial College in London.
  • All four members wrote at least one of their hits. Since they all wrote, it gave them a very diverse sound.
  • Before forming Queen, May and Taylor were in a psychedelic band called Smile.
  • Brian May’s guitar is called the Red Special, and was made with the help of his father, who was an engineer, while Brian was still in high school. The body was made from an old mantelpiece that a family friend had discarded while renovating his house and the whammy bar was made from parts of an old bicycle kick stand. It is the interesting mix of materials that make May’s guitar tone impossible to duplicate and why he sounds so original. It has a unique tone, which has become his signature, and it allowed him to create various sound effects found on many of Queen’s songs, such as “Get Down, Make Love.”
  • They first toured the US as the opening band for Mott The Hoople in 1974.
  • In 1981, they did the soundtrack for the movie Flash Gordon, which was a huge flop.
  • All of the members are very intelligent. In addition to May’s degree in astronomy, they have degrees in biology (Taylor), illustration (Mercury), and electronics (Deacon).
  • They proudly declared that no synthesizers were used in their music until 1980. Roger Taylor was the first member of Queen to get a synth. Taylor recalled to Mojo: “Freddie was all over it – ‘Ooh what does this do?’ It changed the way we did things.”
  • When Mercury moved to England in 1959, he lived less than a football field distance from May, but the two never met until 1970.
  • Mercury’s stamp collection was purchased by the British Postal Service for almost $5,000. It is currently on display at the National Postage Museum.

The Lyrics

I'd sit alone and watch your light
My only friend through teenage nights
And everything I had to know
I heard it on my radio

You gave them all those old time stars
Through wars of worlds invaded by Mars
You made 'em laugh, you made 'em cry
You made us feel like we could fly

So don't become some background noise
A backdrop for the girls and boys
Who just don't know or just don't care
And just complain when you're not there

You had your time, you had the power
You've yet to have your finest hour
Radio, everybody!

All we hear is radio ga ga
Radio goo goo
Radio ga ga
All we hear is radio ga ga
Radio blah blah
Radio, what's new?
Radio, someone still loves you

We watch the shows, we watch the stars
On videos for hours and hours
We hardly need to use our ears
How music changes through the years

Let's hope you never leave, old friend
Like all good things, on you we depend
So stick around 'cause we might miss you
When we grow tired of all this visual

Had your time, you had the power
You've yet to have your finest hour
Radio

All we hear is radio ga ga
Radio goo goo
Radio ga ga
All we hear is radio ga ga
Radio goo goo
Radio ga ga
All we hear is radio ga ga
Radio blah blah
Radio, what's new?
Radio, someone still loves you

Loves
You

Writer/s: Roger Taylor 
Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Courtesy of Songfacts

Song Lyric Sunday – Home

This week, our friend Paula from Light Motifs II, has given us the prompts for Song Lyric Sunday. She has suggested House, Room, Kitchen, Shower and Attic. Hmmm, interesting. I can’t wait to see what everyone comes up with today.

I have chosen ‘Home’ by Daughtry. It’s a great song and I hope you like it.

The Song

Chris Daughtry wrote this on his couch in North Carolina, shortly before had even appeared on the American Idol show.

After coming only 4th on American Idol, Chris Daughtry performed this song to Clive Davis, the head of Sony BMG Music Entertainment who have signed all the “Idol” winners and runners-up. His performance won him a record contract.

“Home” became the send off song for exiting American Idol contenders on the show’s sixth season replacing Daniel Powter’s “Bad Day.”

Daughtry’s self-titled debut was the most popular US album of 2007 selling 3.2 million copies in the States. The American Idol finalist was followed by Akon, who sold 2.7 million copies of Konvicted.

At the 2007 American Music Awards, Daughtry won for Favorite Album, Favorite Adult Contemporary Artist, and Breakthrough Artist. They performed this song at the show.

Before he auditioned for American Idol, Chris Daughtry fronted a band called Absent Element, which formed in a church in Burlington, North Carolina. In 2012 the other three members – lead guitarist Mark Perry, drummer Scott Crawford and bassist Ryan Andrews – claimed they had a role in penning this hit tune, as well as three other songs recorded by Daughtry. According to legal papers filed in North Carolina, it was claimed the singer had reached an understanding on sharing revenues from their compositions and has subsequently defrauded them of the proceeds. Chris Daughtry responded on his website, by describing the accusations as “false.” “I am very hurt,” he added. “The songs listed in this lawsuit were written solely by me and no one else and at this time, I have no further comment.”

The Lyrics

I'm staring out into the night
Trying to hide the pain
I'm going to the place where love
And feeling good don't ever cost a thing
And the pain you feel is a different kind of pain

I'm going home
Back to the place where I belong
And where your love has always been enough for me
I'm not running from
No, I think you got me all wrong
I don't regret this life I chose for me
But these places and these faces are getting old
So I'm going home
Well, I'm going home

The miles are getting longer it seems
The closer I get to you
I've not always been the best man or friend for you
But your love remains true
And I don't know why
You always seem to give me another try

So I'm going home
Back to the place where I belong
And where your love has always been enough for me
I'm not running from
No, I think you got me all wrong
I don't regret this life I chose for me
But these places and these faces are getting old

Be careful what you wish for
'Cause you just might get it all
You just might get it all
And then some you don't want
Be careful what you wish for
'Cause you just might get it all
You just might get it all, yeah

Oh, well I'm going home
Back to the place where I belong
And where your love has always been enough for me
I'm not running from
No, I think you got me all wrong
I don't regret this life I chose for me
But these places and these faces are getting old
I said these places and these faces are getting old
So I'm going home, I'm going home

Written by Chris Daughtry

Song Lyric Sunday – Education – Another Brick In The Wall

For today’s Song Lyric Sunday our friend Paula, from Light Motifs II, has given us the prompts School, College, Education, Class and Degree. Thinking about education I remembered the Pink Floyd classic, Another Brick In The Wall. It has an interesting backstory as well as a fantastic video. Hang in there when you play it, the vocals start at around 1:50 minutes. The video is fascinating to watch so you won’t feel like you’re waiting.

The Song

One of Rolling Stone‘s “500 Greatest Songs of All Time,” this 1979 rock song protests overly restrictive schooling and boarding schools. According to the song, thought control and dark sarcasm are among the tactics that teachers use to control students, and students are better off without them

Roger Waters wrote this song about his views on formal education, which were framed during his time at the Cambridgeshire School for Boys. He hated his grammar school teachers and felt they were more interested in keeping the kids quiet than teaching them. The wall refers to the emotional barrier Waters built around himself because he wasn’t in touch with reality. The bricks in the wall were the events in his life which propelled him to build this proverbial wall around him, and his school teacher was another brick in the wall.

Waters told Mojo, December 2009, that the song is meant to be satirical. He explained: “You couldn’t find anybody in the world more pro-education than me. But the education I went through in boys’ grammar school in the ’50s was very controlling and demanded rebellion. The teachers were weak and therefore easy targets. The song is meant to be a rebellion against errant government, against people who have power over you, who are wrong. Then it absolutely demanded that you rebel against that.”
The children’s chorus that sang on this track came from a school in Islington, England, and was chosen because it was close to the studio. It was made up of 23 kids between the ages of 13 and 15. They were overdubbed 12 times, making it sound like there were many more kids.

The addition of the choir convinced Waters that the song would come together. He told Rolling Stone: “It suddenly made it sort of great.”

Pink Floyd’s producer, Bob Ezrin, had the idea for the chorus. He used a choir of kids when he produced Alice Cooper’s “School’s Out” in 1972. Ezrin liked to use children’s voices on songs about school.

There was some controversy when it was revealed that the chorus was not paid. It also didn’t sit well with teachers that kids were singing an anti-school song. The chorus was given recording time in the studio in exchange for their contribution; the school received £1000 and a Platinum record

.The disco beat was suggested by their producer, Bob Ezrin, who was a fan of the group Chic. This was completely unexpected from Pink Floyd, who specialized in making records you were supposed to listen to, not dance to. He got the idea for the beat when he was in New York and heard something Nile Rodgers was doing.

Pink Floyd rarely released singles that were also on an album because they felt their songs were best appreciated in the context of an album, where the songs and the artwork came together to form a theme. Producer Bob Ezrin convinced them that this could stand on its own and would not hurt album sales. When the band relented and released it as a single, it became their only #1 hit.

Two more songs from the album were subsequently released as singles in America and various other countries, but not in the UK: “Run Like Hell” and “Comfortably Numb.” They had little chart impact.
The concept of the album was to explore the “walls” people put up to protect themselves. Any time something bad happens, we withdraw further, putting up “another brick in the wall.”

The Wall was one of two ideas Waters brought to the band when they got together to record in 1978. His other idea was The Pros and Cons of Hitchhiking, which he ended up recording as a solo album.
Waters’ original demo for this song was just him singing over an acoustic guitar; he saw it as a short interstitial piece for the album. He explained in Mojo: “It was only going to be one verse, a guitar solo and out. Then the late Nick Griffths, the engineer at Britannia Row, recorded the school kids, at my request. He did it brilliantly. It wasn’t until I heard the 24-track tape he sent while we were working at Producer’s Workshop in Los Angeles that I went, ‘Wow, this now a single.’ Talk about shivers down the spine.”

When they first recorded this song, it was one verse and one chorus, lasting 1:20. Producer Bob Ezrin wanted it longer, but the band refused. While they were gone, Ezrin extended it by inserting the kids as the second verse, adding some drum fills, and copying the first chorus to the end. He played it for Waters, who liked what he heard.

“Another Brick In The Wall (part I)” is the third track on The Wall. This section, which contains many of the motifs found on Part II, explains that because Pink’s father went off and died in WWII, he built The Wall to protect him from other people. In the movie you see him at the playground with the other kids and their fathers, then one of the kids leaves with his father and Pink tries to touch the father’s hand. The father pushes him away quite aggressively, then leaves.

This segues seamlessly into Track 4, “The Happiest Days of Our Lives,” which runs 1:50. this is the section that includes the lines:

When we grew up and went to school
There were certain teachers who would
Hurt the children any way they could

“The Happiest Days of Our Lives” explains that the teachers must have it rough in their own homes, getting thrashed by their “fat and psychopathic wives,” which is why they take out their frustrations on the students.

This section flows into “Another Brick In The Wall (part II),” which is Track 5. Radio stations would sometimes play all three songs together, or start at “The Happiest Days of Our Lives.” >>
To make the album, the band came up with the concept of the character “Pink.” Bob Ezrin wrote a script, and they worked the songs around the character. The story was made into the movie The Wall, starring Bob Geldof as “Pink.” Many people believe you have to be stoned to enjoy the film.

For the stage show, a giant wall was erected in front of the band using hidden hydraulic lifts as they played. It measured 160x35ft when completed, and about halfway through the show, the bricks were gradually knocked down to reveal the band.

Waters sang lead. When he left Pink Floyd in 1985 and the band toured without him, Gilmour sang it.
Speaking with Top 2000 a gogo, Roger Waters said: “In the mid-’70s, I’d only just figured out a couple of years before that I was living my life, that I wasn’t actually preparing for something, that life was not something that was going to start at some point. This sudden realization that it started a long time ago, you just didn’t notice.

Really, the most important thing about that song is not the relationship with the school teacher. It was the first little thing I wrote where I lyrically expressed the idea that you could make or build a wall out of a number of different bricks that when they fit together provided something impermeable, and so this was just one of them.

When you hit puberty and start getting snotty, it’s good to have an adult around who will say, ‘Well hang on, let’s talk about that,’ rather than ‘be quiet.'”

The line “We don’t need no education” is grammatically incorrect. It’s a double negative and really means “We need education.” This could be a commentary on the quality of the schools.

The original idea for the concept of the actual Wall they wanted to create came from a problem Roger Waters was having during their concerts. When he started thinking about the show, he wanted to isolate himself from the public because he couldn’t stand all the yelling and shouting. “The Wall” was not just a symbol and a concept, but a way of separating the band from their audience.

The 1998 movie The Faculty has a version of this song remixed by Class Of ’99.

In England, this was released in November 1979 and became the last UK #1 of the ’70s.

On July 21, 1990, Waters staged a production of The Wall in Berlin to celebrate the destruction of The Berlin Wall.

In 2004, Peter Rowan, a Scottish musician who ran a royalties firm, started tracking down the kids who sang in the chorus, who were by then in their 30s. Under a 1996 copyright law, they were entitled to a small amount of money for participating on the record. Rowan was not so much interested in the money as in getting the chorus together for a reunion.

On July 7, 2007, Roger Waters performed this at the Live Earth concert at Giants Stadium in New Jersey. Live Earth was organized to raise awareness of global warming, and the slogan for the event was “Save Our Selves” (S.O.S.). Waters poked fun at Pink Floyd and the event by flying a giant inflatable pig overhead, which was a classic Pink Floyd stage prop, except this one was emblazoned wit the words “Save Our Sausages.”

Roger Waters did the Scottish voices on the track. He told Mojo magazine December 2009, “I can do mad Scotsman and high court judges.”

The teacher character in this song shows up again in Pink Floyd’s next album, The Final Cut (1983), notably in the song “The Hero’s Return.” He is based on the many men who returned from war and entered the teaching profession, as they had no other opportunities.

“Bully For You” is a song by Tom Robinson Band. The song’s lyrical hook is the repeated line, “We don’t need no aggravation.” Tom Robinson believe Pink Floyd (with whom the TRB shared both management and record label) took it as an influence when they were writing “Another Brick In The Wall,” specifically the line, “We don’t need no education.” TRB Two was released in March 1979; Floyd’s The Wall followed nine months later. Tom Robinson says in Classic Rock, November 2015: “There’s no question ‘We don’t need no aggravation’ was in the air around Roger Waters. Roger’s skills as writer are were far more developed than my own. He put a great idea to better use, so fair play to him.”

In 2021, Floyd frontman Roger Waters turned down a “huge, huge amount of money” from Facebook for the right to use “Another Brick in the Wall (part II)” in an ad campaign. For years Waters had been a very vocal supporter of Julian Assange, the head of Wikileaks, who was imprisoned in 2019 for espionage. Waters viewed Assange’s arrest as an attempt to silence true journalism and to stifle dissenting voices. He sees Facebook and the other big tech platforms as being part of that effort to silence dissent and “take over absolutely everything.”

Waters minced no words in his refusal of the money, stating, “And the answer is, F- you. No f-in’ way.” He also called Facebook owner Mark Zuckerberg “one of the most powerful idiots in the world” after questioning how Zuckerberg became so powerful after starting FaceMash, which rated Harvard women based on their looks.

Waters did not make the announcement on social media. He did it the old fashioned way: at a press conference.

Courtesy of Songfacts

The Lyrics

Daddy's flown across the ocean
Leaving just a memory
Snapshot in the family album
Daddy what else did you leave for me?
Daddy, what'd'ja leave behind for me?!?
All in all it was just a brick in the wall.
All in all it was all just bricks in the wall.

"You! Yes, you! Stand still laddy!"

When we grew up and went to school
There were certain teachers who would
Hurt the children any way they could

By pouring their derision
Upon anything we did
And exposing every weakness
However carefully hidden by the kids

But out in the middle of nowhere
When they got home at night, their fat and
Psycopathic wives would thrash them
Within inches of their lives

We don't need no education
We dont need no thought control
No dark sarcasm in the classroom
Teachers leave them kids alone

Hey! Teachers! Leave them kids alone!

All in all it's just another brick in the wall.
All in all you're just another brick in the wall.

We don't need no education
We dont need no thought control
No dark sarcasm in the classroom
Teachers leave them kids alone
Hey! Teachers! Leave us kids alone!
All in all it's just another brick in the wall.
All in all you're just another brick in the wall.

[8:20] "Wrong, Do it again!"
"If you don't eat yer meat, you can't have any pudding. How can you
have any pudding if you don't eat yer meat?"
"You! Yes, you behind the bikesheds, stand still laddy!"

{9:00} [Sound of many TV's coming on, all on different channels]
"The Bulls are already out there"
Pink: "Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaarrrrrgh!"
"This Roman Meal bakery thought you'd like to know."

I don't need no arms around me
And I dont need no drugs to calm me.
I have seen the writing on the wall.
Don't think I need anything at all.
No! Don't think I'll need anything at all.
All in all it was all just bricks in the wall.
All in all you were all just bricks in the wall.

[10:50] Goodbye, cruel world
I'm leaving you today
Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye

Goodbye, all you people
There's nothing you can say
To make me change my mind
Goodbye

Song Lyric Sunday – Spirit – Lion

Lion, Tiger, Bear, Eagle and Shark are the prompts for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday, hosted by our friend Jim Adams.

Plenty of material to choose from once you start looking. The Lion King is a favorite musical of mine and this beautiful song, ‘Spirit” by Beyonce is perfect for the prompt. It refers to our path in life and need for strength while facing the unknown as in Simba’s journey after the death of his father, Mufasa I hope you enjoy it along with the beautifully produced video.

The Song

Beyoncé recorded this inspirational song for the soundtrack of the live-action remake of The Lion King and the companion album The Lion King: The Gift. It plays in the film during a pivotal scene with Nala, Simba’s childhood best friend and future love interest. Beyoncé also stars in the movie as the voice of the powerful Nala.

The Lion King tells the story of Simba, a young lion who struggles to succeed his father as King of the Pride Lands. The song starts off with a chant in Swahili, which translates as “long live the king.” The phrase acts as encouragement for the lion and his spirit to prevail.

Beyoncé co-wrote and co-produced this song of strength with:

Swedish-Persian songwriter IIya Salmanzadeh, who has co-penned several of Ariana Grande’s hits, including “Problem,” “No Tears Left to Cry,” “God Is A Woman” and “Break Up With Your Girlfriend, I’m Bored .”

English dance/hip-hop singer and producer Labrinth. Best known for his own hit single “Beneath Your Beautiful,” Labrinth has also contributed to tunes by Noah Cyrus (“Make Me (Cry)”), The Weeknd (“Losers”) and Nicki Minaj (“Majesty”).

Beyoncé produced and curated The Lion King: The Gift companion album. She said that the songs were inspired by the remake’s storyline, which “gives the listener a chance to imagine their own imagery, while listening to a new contemporary interpretation.”

The song’s music video features shots of Beyoncé rocking some colorful gowns against picturesque landscapes (parts of the visual were shot at Havasu Falls in Arizona). Those scenes are interspersed with clips from The Lion King. Her daughter, Blue Ivy, also makes a brief appearance when she joins her mom among a troupe of dancers.

Beyoncé told ABC News’ Robin Roberts the concept of the video is “to show how God is the painter and natural beauty in nature needs no art direction.”

“It’s the beauty of color, the beauty of melanin, the beauty of tradition,” she added.

The Lyrics

Uishi kwa muda mrefu mfalme
(Uishi kwa, uishi kwa)
Uishi kwa muda mrefu mfalme
(Uishi kwa, uishi kwa)

Yeah, yeah, and the wind is talkin'
Yeah, yeah, for the very first time
With a melody that pulls you towards it
Paintin' pictures of paradise

Sayin' rise up to the light in the sky, yeah
Watch the light lift your heart up
Burn your flame through the night

Whoa, spirit
Watch the heavens open (open), yeah
Spirit, can you hear it callin'? (Callin')
Yeah

Yeah, yeah, and the water's crashin'
Trying to keep your head up high
While you're tremblin', that's when the magic happens
And the stars (stars) gather by (gather by)
By your side

Sayin' rise up to the light in the sky, yeah
Let the light lift your heart up
Burn your flame through the night

Yeah, spirit
Watch the heavens open (open), yeah
Spirit, can you hear it callin'? (Callin')
Yeah (yeah)

Your destiny is comin' close
Stand up and fight
So go into that far off land
And be one with the great I am, I am
Boy becomes a man

Whoa, spirit
Watch the heavens open (open), yeah
Spirit, can you hear it callin'? (Callin'?) Yeah
Spirit, yeah, watch the heavens open, open, yeah
Spirit, spirit, can you hear it callin'? (Callin')
Yeah (yeah)

Your destiny is comin' close
Stand up and fight
So go into a far off land
And be one with the great I am

Writer/s: Beyonce Gisselle Knowles, Ilya Salmanzadeh, Timothy Lee Mckenzie 
Publisher: Walt Disney Music Company
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Courtesy of Songfacts

Song Lyric Sunday – Born on the Bayou


Our host for Song Lyric Sunday, Jim Adams, has given us the prompts of Birth, Death and Life this week. Thanks Jim, because now I can use one of my favorite Creedence Clearwater Revival songs, Born on the Bayou. I love vintage CCR and have included the best version of the song along with a video of the band from Woodstock. John Fogerty can still rock that song to this day!

The Song

Creedence Clearwater Revival frontman John Fogerty, who wrote the song, had never actually been to a bayou when he wrote the song – he researched it in encyclopedias and imagined a bayou childhood for the song’s narrative. Fogerty, who is from the very unswamplike Berkeley, California, got his first look at a bayou courtesy of John Fred, the one-hit wonder who sang “Judy In Disguise (with Glasses).” Fred was from Louisiana, and when Creedence played a show in Baton Rouge in 1969, he met Fogerty at a rehearsal and offered to take him to a real bayou. They drove 15 minutes to Bayou Forche, where they ate some crabs and crayfish, giving Fogerty the idea for this song.
In Rolling Stone’s “100 Greatest Guitar Songs” issue, Fogerty explained that the song originated when Creedence Clearwater Revival were booked at San Francisco’s Avalon Ballroom in 1968. Said Fogerty: “We were the #7 act on the bill, bottom of the totem pole. And as the first guys to go on, we were the last to soundcheck before they opened the doors. It was like, ‘Here’s the drums, boom, boom; here’s the guitar, clank, clank.’ I looked over at the guys and said, ‘Hey, follow this!’ Basically, it was the riff and the attitude of ‘Born on the Bayou,’ without the words.”

Drummer Doug Clifford remembers it happening in the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles. >>
Fogerty says the song was inspired by gospel music and popular movies. He explained in Bad Moon Rising: The Unofficial History of Creedence Clearwater Revivial, “‘Born on the Bayou’ was… about a mythical childhood and a heat-filled time, the Fourth of July. I put it in the swamp where, of course, I had never lived. I was trying to be a pure writer, no guitar in hand, visualizing and looking at the bare walls of my apartment. ‘Chasing down a hoodoo.’ Hoodoo is a magical, mystical, spiritual, non-defined apparition, like a ghost or a shadow, not necessarily evil, but certainly otherworldly.”

Hoodoo was the name of a 1976 solo album by Fogerty that he never released. By his own account, it was terrible. A couple of singles leaked out, though. Unfortunately for Fogerty, at least one (“You’ve got the Magic”) can be found on Youtube.
Fogerty considers this his favorite CCR song. He performed it on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno in November 2005. >>
This was the first song Creedence played in their set at Woodstock in 1969. They were a big part of the festival, performing 11 songs on the second day. The band first hit the stage at 3:30 am when the majority of the Woodstock crowd was zonked out. Fogerty recalled:

“We were ready to rock out and we waited and waited and finally it was our turn … there were a half million people asleep. These people were out. It was sort of like a painting of a Dante scene, just bodies from hell, all intertwined and asleep, covered with mud.

And this is the moment I will never forget as long as I live: A quarter mile away in the darkness, on the other edge of this bowl, there was some guy flicking his Bic [lighter], and in the night I hear, ‘Don’t worry about it, John. We’re with you.’ I played the rest of the show for that guy.”

The Foo Fighters covered this song at “Shelter from the Storm: A Concert for the Gulf Coast” following Hurricane Katrina in 2005.


Doug Clifford said “Born on the Bayou” is his favorite CCR song, “bar none.”
“Born on the Bayou,” “Proud Mary,” and “Choolgin'” were all connected in John Fogerty’s mind. In Bad Moon Rising, he said, “I was writing these at night, and I remember that Bobby Kennedy got killed during this time. I saw that late at night. They kept showing it over and over. ‘Bayou’ and ‘Proud Mary’ and ‘Chooglin” were all kind of cooking at that time. I’d say that was when the whole swamp bayou myth was born—right there in a little apartment in El Cerrito. It was late at night and I was probably delirious from lack of sleep. I remember that I thought it would be cool if these songs cross-referenced each other. Once I was doing that, I realized that I was kind of working on a mythical place.”
This is referenced in Stephen King’s 1978 short story collection, Night Shift. It plays on the truck stop jukebox in the story “Trucks.”

The Lyrics

Now, when I just was a little boy
Standin' to my Daddy's knee
My poppa said "Son, don't let the man get you
And do what he done to me

I can remember the fourth of July
Runnin' through the backwood bare
And I can still hear my old hound dog barkin'
Chasin' down a hoodoo there
Chasin' down a hoodoo there

Born on the Bayou
Born on the Bayou
Born on the Bayou

Wish I was back on the Bayou,
Rollin' with some Cajun Queen.
Wishin' I where a fast freight train
Just a chooglin' on down to New Orleans
Born on the Bayou
Born on the Bayou
Born on the Bayou

I can remember the fourth of July,
Runnin' through the back wood bare.
And I can still hear my old hound dog barkin'
Chasin' down a hoodoo there
Chasin' down a hoodoo there

Born on the Bayou
Born on the Bayou
Born on the Bayou

Written by John Fogerty

Song Lyric Sunday – Stay – Past, Present, Future


This was a tough Song Lyric Sunday for me this week. Our host, Jim Adams, gave us Past, Present and Future as the prompts. My first thought was Living in the Past by Jethro Tull, but that was covered just last week. Typically I prefer to find a song with a prompt word in the title but found it difficult today. So I have chosen a song by Rihanna, featuring Mikky Ekko, called Stay. It is about temptation and Rihanna would like him to stay in the present, but he will probably move on and be a thing of her past.

The Song

Stay” was recorded by Barbadian singer Rihanna for her seventh studio album, Unapologetic (2012). It features guest vocals by Mikky Ekko and was released as the second single from the album on January 7, 2013. “Stay” was co-written by Ekko and Justin Parker. The song’s lyrical content speaks of temptation and the inability to resist true love. Music critics were generally positive in their opinion regarding the balladry, with most describing it as a standout track on the album.

Upon the release of Unapologetic, “Stay” charted on multiple charts worldwide. Following its release as a single, it reached number one in Bulgaria, Canada, the Czech Republic, Denmark and Israel and the top five in twenty-four countries worldwide including Australia, France, Germany, New Zealand, Norway, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. It peaked at number three on the US Billboard Hot 100, becoming Rihanna’s twenty-fourth top ten on the chart, thus surpassing Whitney Houston’s tally. Furthermore, it has charted at number one on the US Pop Songs chart and 16 on the Hot Dance Club Songs chart. Worldwide the single has sold over 10 million copies making it one of the best selling singles of all time.

The song’s accompanying music video, directed by Sophie Muller, depicts Rihanna naked in a bathtub filled with cloudy water, while Ekko sings in a separate bathroom. Critics likened the vulnerability and raw emotion in the video to the song itself. Rihanna premiered “Stay” on Saturday Night Live in the United States, while she performed the song in the United Kingdom on the ninth series of The X Factor. Rihanna and Ekko also performed “Stay” at the 2013 Grammy Awards. The track was included on the set list of the majority of her 777 Tour promotional tour dates, in support of the album, while it was included on Rihanna’s fifth headlining tour, the “Diamonds World Tour” in the encore and the opening song of her seventh headlining tour, the “Anti World Tour”.

Courtesy of Wiki

The Lyrics

All along it was a fever
A cold sweat, hot headed believer
I threw my hands in the air, said, "Show me something"
He said, "If you dare, come a little closer"

Round and around and around and around we go
Oh, now tell me now, tell me now, tell me now you know

Not really sure how to feel about it
Something in the way you move
Makes me feel like I can't live without you
It takes me all the way
I want you to stay

It's not much of a life you're living
It's not just something you take, it's given

Round and around and around and around we go
Oh, now tell me now, tell me now, tell me now you know

Not really sure how to feel about it
Something in the way you move
Makes me feel like I can't live without you
It takes me all the way
And I want you to stay

Ooh, the reason I hold on
Ooh, 'cause I need this hole gone
Well, funny you're the broken one 
But I'm the only one who needed saving
'Cause when you never see the light 
It's hard to know which one of us is caving

Not really sure how to feel about it
Something in the way you move
Makes me feel like I can't live without you
It takes me all the way
I want you to stay
Stay
I want you to stay
Ooh

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: John Stephen Sudduth / Justin Parker / Mikky Ekko
Stay lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Universal Music Publishing Group, Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd.
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