Tag: music

Song Lyric Sunday – Breakfast at Tiffany’s

Our friend Paula of Light Motifs II has given us this week’s prompts for Song Lyric Sunday, hosted by Jim Adams. Her suggestions are Breakfast, Brunch, Dinner, Lunch, Snack and Supper.

I have chosen Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Deep Blue Something. A cute song and video that I remember from the 90s. but the band was really a one hit wonder. The good thing about Song Lyric Sunday is that when you start researching these songs you sometimes find a really interesting backstory. In this case it was Truman Capote’s connection to Rock Music!.

Songfacts

Breakfast at Tiffany’s” is a 1995 song recorded by American alternative rock band Deep Blue Something. Originally appearing on the album 11th Song, it was later re-recorded and released on their album Home. It was the band’s only hit,  peaking at number five on the US Billboard Hot 100. Outside the United States, “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” topped the UK Singles Chart and peaked within the top ten on the charts of Australia, Flanders, Canada, Denmark, Germany, Iceland, the Republic of Ireland and Sweden.

Follow-up singles failed to match the success of “Breakfast at Tiffany’s”, hence the reason for the band’s classification as a one-hit wonder.

Deep Blue Something lead singer Todd Pipes was inspired to write this song after seeing Audrey Hepburn in the film Roman Holiday, but he thought “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” would be a better title.
Breakfast at Tiffany’s is a 1961 movie based on a book by Truman Capote. It starred Audrey Hepburn as Holly Golightly, a high-priced escort looking for a rich man to marry. The movie made the song “Moon River” famous.

The song is a humorous and optimistic look at a failing relationship. One partner focuses on how different the two people are and how they aren’t going to last as a couple:

You say that we’ve got nothing in common
No common ground to start from
And we’re falling apart

The other partner, however, focuses on one small detail they have in common which is that they both like the movie Breakfast at Tiffany’s. The speaker clings to this one detail and repeats it five times as the chorus in the song:

And I said, “What about Breakfast at Tiffany’s”
She said, “I think I remember the film”
and as I recall, I think, we both kinda liked it
And I said, “Well, that’s one thing we got”

Deep Blue Something was formed by four college students from the University of North Texas. This was their only hit, and they did not release another album until Byzantium in 1998.
Todd Pipes recalled to Q magazine November 2008 that promoting this song got to be pretty tiresome. He explained: “As the song had Breakfast in the title, radio stations thought it would be genius to have us on at breakfast time. We’d be up till 3 a.m. and they’d wonder why we were pissed off playing at 6am.”

Truman Capote (1924 – 1984) was an American author, many of whose short stories, novels, plays and non-fiction are recognized literary classics. He was born in Louisiana and his early works, including The Glass Harp, are about the South. He then moved to New York, where he wrote scripts for plays and films plus further novels including his 1958 novella Breakfast at Tiffany’s. In the early 1960s, Capote’s career flagged until In Cold Blood (1965), his journalistic work about the murder of a Kansas farm family in their home, made Capote a celebrity.

Capote was 5 feet 3 inches tall and openly homosexual. His distinctive, high-pitched voice and odd vocal mannerisms were bought to life in Philip Seymour Hoffman’s Oscar-winning portrayal of him in the 2005 movie, Capote.
Apart from this song, Capote has several other connections to rock music. They include:

1) In 1972 Capote was commissioned by Rolling Stone to cover the Rolling Stones’ tour of North America. And though he set out on the tour and began taking copious notes, he quickly fell out with Mick Jagger and refused to write the article. “Mick Jagger is about as sexy as a pissing toad,” he later cattily averred.

2) Capote posthumously appeared on the sleeve of The Smiths’ 1985 single, The Boy with the Thorn in His Side. English fashion and portrait photographer Cecil Beaton took the picture in 1949.

3) Capote was name-checked along with a number of other famous people in the Red Hot Chili Peppers’ 1991 track, “Mellowship Slinky In B Major.”

Courtes of Wiki and Songfacts

Lyrics

You'll say we've got nothing in common
No common ground to start from
And we're falling apart
You say the world has come between us
Our lives have come between us
Still I know you just don't care

And I said, "What about Breakfast at Tiffany's?"
She said, "I think I remember the film
And as I recall, I think we both kinda liked it"
And I said, "Well, that's the one thing we've got"

I see you, the only one who knew me
But now your eyes see through me
I guess I was wrong
So what now? It's plain to see we're over
And I hate when things are over
When so much is left undone

And I said, "What about Breakfast at Tiffany's?"
She said, "I think I remember the film
And as I recall, I think we both kinda liked it"
And I said, "Well, that's the one thing we've got"

You say that we've got nothing in common
No common ground to start from
And we're falling apart
You say the world has come between us
Our lives have come between us
Still I know you just don't care

And I said, "What about Breakfast at Tiffany's?"
She said, "I think I remember the film
And as I recall, I think we both kinda liked it"
And I said, "Well, that's the one thing we've got"

Ooh, and I said, "What about Breakfast at Tiffany's?"
She said, "I think I remember the film
And as I recall, I think we both kinda liked it"
And I said, "Well, that's the one thing we've got"

And I said, "What about Breakfast at Tiffany's?"
She said, "I think I remember the film
And as I recall, I think we both kinda liked it"
And I said, "Well, that's the one thing we've got"

Writer/s: Todd David Pipes 
Publisher: Warner Chappell Music, Inc.
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – Smooth

We have been prompted with one word titles this week for Song Lyric Sunday challenge, hosted by our good friend Jim Adams. I have to go with the perennial Santana and “Smooth” featuring Rob Thomas. It’s hard for me to believe that this song is over 20 years old already! I hope you enjoy it. I know I never get tired of listening to it.

Rob Thomas from Matchbox Twenty wrote this with Itaal Shur, a songwriter and producer who has worked with Jewel, Robi Rosa and Maxwell (co-writing his first hit, “Ascension (Don’t Ever Wonder).” Shur said in a Songfacts interview: “I was already active in the music business. I had some hit records with Maxwell and I was already touring the world with Groove Collective, so people knew me more in the underground scene, but I wasn’t as big as Rob Thomas, of course. My manager at the time told me that Pete Ganbarg, who was working at the time at Arista, he was looking for music for the new Santana record. At the time, I had my own band and was performing a lot around the city. I jumped at it because I grew up with an older brother who hipped me up to classic rock and I always loved Santana.

I went up to the office and I wanted to hear what they had first to see what kind of direction they were going for, and when I went up there I heard the Wyclef track, I heard the Dave Matthews track, I heard a couple of other tracks, and I realized there wasn’t the kind of track that was, in my opinion, a standard Santana groove like ‘Black Magic Woman,’ ‘Oye Como Va,’ ‘Evil Ways.’ So I went home and wrote this track on guitar with all the arrangements called ‘Room One Seven.’ It was about this couple that meet after a long time and have a little tryst in the hotel room.

I brought it to Arista and they loved the instrumental and they liked parts of the melodies, but they didn’t like the lyrics – they thought it was a little too sexual for Santana – so they asked me if I wanted to work with Rob Thomas. I didn’t know him; I’d heard a little bit about Matchbox Twenty. He happened to live at the time in Soho very close to me. He came over and he had already written the verses to the instrumental that Arista gave him. I had a chorus that had the same melody: ‘Room One Seven on the seventeenth floor. Take the elevator and I’ll meet you at the door.’ He didn’t have a chorus, so before he came, I changed the words around to, ‘Give me the ocean, give me the moon, give me something hot to make my body move,’ and this turned into the chorus that we all know.”

Thomas sang lead on this, but that wasn’t the plan. He had never written a song for someone else before, so he jumped at the chance to write a song with Shur for Santana, figuring it would boost his songwriting bona fides. When they finished the song, Thomas suggested George Michael, one of his musical heroes, as the vocalist. Arista Records ended up asking Thomas to do the vocals, and when he did, it was in Michael’s style. “If you listen to the melody and the cadence, it’s an attempt to emulate his style in so many ways,” he told Billboard.

When Thomas launched his solo career a few years later, he once again emulated Michael, who also made the transition from a group (Wham!) to a solo artist.

Many of the lyrics are Thomas’ ode to his wife, the former Marisol Maldonado, who is Puerto Rican. “My Mu Equita” translates to “My Little Doll” in Spanish; Thomas also calls her his “Spanish Harlem Mona Lisa.” Marisol appears in the video.

GQ published an “oral history” satire of this song in 2016, which is filled with confabulations like this quote from Rob Thomas: “I didn’t even know who Carlos Santana was at this point. I actually thought he was the guy that who was in charge of Libya.”

The song’s co-writer Itaal Shur told us: “The guitar solo from my demo, Santana copied that solo, which was a huge compliment and all the breaks were also on my demo. It was really weird, my demo was kind of like a template for the live band to play. They sped up the song two beats: it was like at 1/13 and went to 1/15 and it went from A Flat Minor to A Minor. They played it as a band and recorded it all live, pretty much. Me and Rob, when we were writing the song, the verses were fine, but we went through about four or five changes with the record company; from like, ‘Give me the ocean, give me the moon,’ ‘You’re just like the ocean…’ Pete Ganbarg, who if it wasn’t for him this song wouldn’t have come together because he put me and Rob together, he said some really good comments about the lyrics – he was an English major and really picky about lyrics. It was a really good collaboration.”

This won Song Of The Year and Record Of The Year at the 2000 Grammys. Supernatural also won for Best Rock Album and Album Of The Year. >>

Clive Davis is a legendary record executive who was the mastermind behind this album. Santana had not had a hit since “Hold On” in 1982, so Davis teamed him up with contemporary musicians like Wyclef Jean, Everlast and Lauryn Hill to make sure the younger generation took notice. The result was a wildly successful album that went over well with Santana’s old fans and created a legion of new ones. This was the first single, and it spent 12 weeks at #1 in the US.

Santana has the distinction of waiting the longest between his first charting single and first #1 hit. In 1969, “Tango” hit #56 in the US, and 30 years later this was #1.

The trend of aging rockers calling in hot young artists to give them contemporary appeal became known in the music press as “The Carlos Santana Effect,” thanks to his Supernatural success.

Marcus Raboy directed the music video. He also did the video for the Supernatural track “Maria Maria.”

Looking back on the song in 2020, Thomas told Songfacts: “I believe the best part of the whole process is that Carlos and I have become so close that we communicate just about every day. Always sending silly messages or song ideas or pics from our day. He’s been a great mentor but an even greater friend.”

Thomas found out this had been released as a single when he was standing on a street corner in Manhattan. A convertible full of girls pulled up with the song blasting on the car radio. He knew it was really big when he went to Los Angeles a short time later and encountered Jason Newsted of Metallica coming out of an elevator. Thomas told CBC Radio: “He came out of an elevator and was like, ‘Hey Rob’ – and I’d never met him – ‘Hey Rob, man, love that Carlos song.’ And I was like, ‘Alright, this has gone from New York hot girls to Metallica. There’s something happening here.”

LYRICS

Man, it's a hot one
Like seven inches from the midday sun
Well, I hear you whispering in the words, to melt everyone
But you stay so cool
My muñequita, my Spanish Harlem, Mona Lisa
You're my reason for reason
The step in my groove

And if you said this life ain't good enough
I would give my world to lift you up
I could change my life to better suit your mood
Because you're so smooth

And it's just like the ocean under the moon
Oh, it's the same as the emotion that I get from you
You got the kind of lovin' that can be so smooth, yeah
Give me your heart, make it real or else forget about it

But I'll tell you one thing
If you would leave it would be a crying shame
In every breath and every word
I hear your name calling me out
Out from the barrio
You hear my rhythm on your radio
You feel the turning of the world, so soft and slow
It's turning you round and round

And if you said this life ain't good enough
I would give my world to lift you up
I could change my life to better suit your mood
Because you're so smooth

And it's just like the ocean under the moon
Oh, it's the same as the emotion that I get from you
You got the kind of lovin' that can be so smooth, yeah
Give me your heart, make it real or else forget about it

And it's just like the ocean under the moon
Oh, it's the same as the emotion that I get from you
You got the kind of lovin' that can be so smooth, yeah
Give me your heart, make it real or else forget about it

Or else forget about it
Or else forget about it
Let's not forget about it
Give me your heart, make it real
Let's not forget about it
Let's not forget about it
Let's not forget about it
Let's not forget about it
Let's not forget about it

Courtesy of Songfacts

The Music in Me

The Music in Me

I hear an old song
as if for the first time
Words beautiful
Resonating deeply
Taking up residence
in my head
Playing over and over
taking me to places
I have never gone
The music hypnotic
and lyrics
touching my soul
Inspiring my own
poetry in motion
Compelled to write
of the visions that dance
in my head
Round and round
in circles spinning
Spherical objects
floating in air
Lifting me 
Taking me
away
 
 
Copyright © 2021 Christine Bolton - Poetry for Healing
All Rights Reserved

Merril is hosting D'Verse Poets tonight
and has prompted us with 'Connections'

'For this prompt, I want you to think about
connecting or connections—in any sense.
It could be connecting ideas, connecting
historical moments, or your own connections
with people, places, nature, or art'

I recently participated in a music prompt of
'Circles' from another blog and chose the song
Windmills of your Mind. It is from the movie
remake of The Thomas Crown Affair.  For some
reason I could not get it out of my head, so
I guess I connected with it. I'm sharing it below.

Image by freeillustrated from Pixabay

Music of Madness – Poem of the Month – December 2020

Music of Madness

Hypnotic sounds
calling in silver
from sitar strings
Following though 
forests of jade jewels 
Arms stretched wide
clutching as rainbows
slip through hands 
Crimson-pink quavers
trail from fingertips
Words of grey
float on clouds 
scratched into 
purple sky
The rusty refuge
sunken deep
into monotone
memories
as a finale of
spinning cymbals
of gold crash land on
symphony’s saffron strands

 
Copyright © 2020 Christine Bolton - Poetry for Healing
All Rights Reserved

Grace is hosting D'Verse Poets tonight
and has prompted us with part two of
Synesthesia.
Today we will incorporate music in our poem
from the perspectiveof a synesthete.
Create your own Symphony.
Infuse your musical experience when listening
to a band, artist or musical genre, with colors,
sounds & textures.
Write a song filled with colors.

I was inspired by "Tomorrow Never Knows"
by the Beatles from their Revolver album.
It is 'trippy' and easy to conjure up
colors and movement.

Word Prompts

Refuge - FOWC
Jade - RDP


Image by Raheel Shakeel from Pixabay 

Impetuous

Impetuous

The melodious sound
of instruments
broke the still night air
A soft rhythmic beat
appealing and seducing 
daring to share
 
Like a moth to a flame
it lured and cajoled
with musical ingenuity
Lacking self-control
It was easy to be tempted
Succumbing to promiscuity
 
Heart racing
and adrenalin flowing
Caution thrown to the wind
The course uncharted
and on this whim
all hopes were pinned
 
 
Christine Bolton - Poetry for Healing ©
Mish is hosting D'Verse Poets
Open Link Night

Word Prompts
Melodious - WotD
Ingenuity - RDP
Chart - FOWC

Photo - Stephan Keller, Pixabay

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