Tag: Searching

Song Lyric Sunday – Search

Van Morrison – Van the Man – is my favorite artist.  He is still touring and recording amazing albums.  This is a lovely song about searching.  Enjoy!

in response to Helen Vahdati’s Song Lyric Sunday – Search

Philosophers Stone
Van Morrison

Out on the highways and the by-ways all alone
I’m still searching for, searching for my home
Up in the morning, up in the morning out on the road
And my head is aching and my hands are cold
And I’m looking for the silver lining, silver lining in the clouds
And I’m searching for and
I’m searching for the philosophers stone
And it’s a hard road, Its a hard road daddy-o
When my job is turning lead into gold
He was born in the back street, born in the back street Jelly Roll
I’m on the road again and I’m searching for
The philosophers stone
Can you hear that engine
Woe can you hear that engine drone
Well I’m on the road again and I’m searching for
Searching for the philosophers stone
Up in the morning, up in the morning
When the streets are white with snow
It’s a hard road, it’s a hard road daddy-o
Up in the morning, up in the morning
Out on the job
Well you’ve got me searching for
Searching for, the philosophers stone
Even my best friends, even my best friends they don’t know
That my job is turning lead into gold
When you hear that engine, when you hear that engine drone
I’m on the road again and I’m searching for the philosophers stone
It’s a hard road even my best friends they don’t know
And I’m searching for, searching for the philosophers stone
According to Wikipedia
The Philosopher’s Stone (album) The Philosopher’s Stone is a compilation album by Northern Irish singer-songwriter Van Morrison released in 1998 (see 1998 in music). The songs released on this 2-CD thirty-track album were previously unreleased outtakes from 1969 to 1988.

Serendipity

Is it Serendipity
Or just stupidity
Searching for you
Looking for affinity
Hoping for sensitivity
Can I see this through

Hopes are raised
Personalities praised
Skipping a heartbeat
Eyes are glazed
Not amazed
Once more repeat

A merry-go-round
In an adult playground
Is there a better way
You just want to mess around
Another king uncrowned
Try again another day

Christine Bolton

Life Patterns

Two lost souls wandering
Life had broken the heart
Born same place and time, yet
Three thousand miles apart

Opposites in every which way
Growing and learning
Fighting life’s battles
All the while yearning

Affection withheld
When so desperately needed
Tricked by those convincing them
To go there unheeded

In disguise to dupe
Love appeared from the blue
Confusing and manipulating
Never proving to be true

Love was a weakness
It was an Achilles heel
Difficult to hold on to
Like a slippery eel

Pain and torture
Of trying again and again
Handing out life’s résumé
Never knowing when

Some would turn on the crazy
Never knowing what you’d get
Hokey-pokey relationships
You’re in, you’re out, never a duet

To embrace the notorious game
Somehow continuing to look
Knowing each other was out there
Until discovered by hook or by crook

So similar were the life patterns
They were smitten instantly
Their pieces came together
Fitting each other beautifully

Bodies and minds now intertwined
Looking back at the past
Coming from different worlds
And celebrating together at last

Christine Bolton

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Looking For The Other Half

The Word of The Day Challenge for June 17 is Moiety. Admittedly I had to look this one up, but I’m thankful to learn its meaning.  It’s definition according to Merriman-Webster’s dictionary is “Moiety: one of two equal parts – Half” It reminded me of a Plato allegory that I discovered some years ago and instantly loved. It’s a beautiful story and worth the read. Here is a brief synopsis of the lengthy document I found on theconversation.com with some links to the Symposium if you are interested.

“In the beginning, humans were androgynous. So says Aristophanes in his fantastical account of the origins of love in Plato’s Symposium. Not only did early humans have both sets of sexual organs, Aristophanes reports, but they were outfitted with two faces, four hands, and four legs. These monstrosities were very fast – moving by way of cartwheels – and they were also quite powerful. So powerful, in fact, that the gods were nervous for their dominion. Wanting to weaken the humans, Zeus, Greek king of Gods, decided to cut each in two, and commanded his son Apollo “to turn its face…towards the wound so that each person would see that he’d been cut and keep better order.” If, however, the humans continued to pose a threat, Zeus promised to cut them again – “and they’ll have to make their way on one leg, hopping!” The severed humans were  a miserable lot, Aristophanes says. “[Each] one longed for its other half, and so they would throw their arms about each other, weaving themselves together, wanting to grow together.” Finally, Zeus, moved by pity, decided to turn their sexual organs to the front, so they might achieve some satisfaction in embracing.”

I find this story very romantic.  For those of us who believe in soulmates and two halves making a whole, this allegory would seem to confirm our thoughts.  I found it buried in a self-help relationship book that someone had recommended to me.  I felt better instantly because I always had an indescribable feeling my whole life that something was missing.  As if I were limping through life with only one leg. For fear of sounding dramatic, the book, and Plato’s allegory, changed my way of thinking about life and the universe.  We waste too much time searching for the wrong things and not realizing that it is us who hinder our own progress.   I hope you enjoyed this. Christine Bolton Word of the day Challenge: Moiety Follow Poetry For Healing on WordPress.com

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