Tag: Song Lyric Sunday

Song Lyric Sunday – New Wave Music

The genre for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday is New Wave. Thank you to our host, Jim Adams, for the prompt. New Wave Music really came into its own in the early 80s with a rush of new bands. It was cool and chic and the bands had a definite new look and sound. The use of synthesizers became more prominent. One of my favorite bands at that time was Tears For Fears. Their biggest and most recognizable song is “Everybody Wants To Rule The World”. It has been covered many times over the 30 plus years since its release, by different artists and featured in TV shows and movies, Most recently it was featured in the Budweiser video for The FIFA World Cup theme “The World is Yours To Take” by Lil Baby and Tears For Fears (See end of post for video)

The Song

This song is about the quest for power, and how it can have unfortunate consequences. In an interview with Mix magazine, the band’s producer Chris Hughes explained that they spent months working on “Shout,” and near the end of the sessions, Roland Orzabal came into the studio and played two simple chords on his acoustic guitar, which became the basis for the song. Said Hughes: “‘Everybody Wants to Rule the World’ was so simple and went down so quickly, it was effortless, really. In fact, as a piece of recording history, it’s bland as hell.”

This was the first US #1 hit for Tears for Fears. “Shout” went to #1 two months later.

“Everybody Wants To Rule The World” is a line from the 1980 Clash song “Charlie Don’t Surf.” Did Tears for Fears lift it? Joe Strummer of The Clash thought so. He recounted a story to Musician magazine about confronting Roland Orzabal in a restaurant, informing Orzabal that “you owe me a fiver.” Strummer said that Roland reached in his pocket and produced a five pound note, ostensibly as compensation for poaching the line for his hit title.

Although musically this is quite a jangly and catchy song, its lyrical theme is actually pretty dark. “The concept is quite serious – it’s about everybody wanting power, about warfare and the misery it causes,” Curt Smith of Tears For Fears explained on the band’s website.

Dennis Miller used this over the closing credits of his HBO TV show, which ran from 1994-2002.

Curt Smith did a solo, acoustic version of this for the soundtrack to The Private Public, a 2001 movie where he made his acting debut.

The song was covered by Lorde for the Hunger Games: Catching Fire soundtrack, which was released by Republic. She reworked Tears for Fears’ tune into a haunting dirge, bringing out its inherent darkness. The label’s executive VP Tom Mackay explained to Billboard magazine that the New Zealand singer-songwriter was wrapping her Pure Heroine album at the time tracks were being solicited for the soundtrack. “There was not time for her to write a demo, submit it and come back after changes [are requested],” Mackay said. “Like a lot of songs on this album, it’s an artistic leap. When we heard it, we were amazed how she reshaped it-it’s hard not to think about President Snow and the Capitol in the film and in the book.”

In a season 2 episode of the TV series Mr. Robot, the character Angela Moss (Portia Doubleday) sings a plaintive karaoke version of this song as she struggles through a moral crisis. “You really have a desire to rule the world?” a guy asks her when she comes to the bar. “Oh, my desires go way beyond that,” she replies.

The band had trouble getting into the original incarnation of the song, which featured the lyric “everybody wants to go to war.” When it was changed to the title phrase, everything clicked. “Once we got those lyrics, it was a joyful song,” Orzabal explained.

Tears For Fears spent most of 1985 touring in support of the Songs From The Big Chair album. It took so much out of them physically and emotionally, they didn’t go back to work until a few years later, finally emerging in 1989 with their album The Seeds Of Love. Curt Smith explained in Outlook magazine: “We soon realized that touring isn’t much fun with a bunch of drum machines and sequencers. We didn’t get into the music business to be computer programmers. I did it to be a musician! On that tour, I just went out and did the album for nine months. If people wanted to hear the album, they could’ve stayed home and listened to it.”

This was used in the 1985 movie Real Genius, about a group of teen geniuses, led by Val Kilmer, who try to foil their professor’s plot to sell their high-powered laser to the military. It was also featured in the 1997 comedy Romy and Michele’s High School Reunion, starring Lisa Kudrow and Mira Sorvino, the 2015 NWA biopic  Straight Outta Compton and the ’80s-themed Steven Spielberg film Ready Player One (2018).

This was featured in several TV shows, including ER (“Sharp Relief,” 1998), Cold Case (“Greed,” 2004), Malcolm in the Middle (“Lois Battles Jamie,” 2005), Numb3rs (“Hot Shot,” 2006), Brothers & Sisters (“States of the Union,” 2007), The Wire (“React Quotes,” 2008), Medium (“But for the Grace of God,” 2008), Psych (“A Nightmare on State Street,” 2014), and Riverdale (“Chapter Thirty-Nine: The Midnight Club,” 2018).

Because “Shout” was the group’s first single in the rest of the world, Tears For Fears thought it should also be their first release in the US, but the record label insisted “Everybody Wants To Rule The World” was better suited for their American debut. “Which is interesting in retrospect,” Smith told Consequence of Sound, “because it was one of those times when the record company was right and we were wrong, because for America, yes, it was a better first single.”

The 30th anniversary re-release of the album contains a few different versions of the song, including a live performance from Canada’s Massey Hall, an alternate single, and an instrumental rendition. Smith said of the instrumental: “When you strip a vocal off a track, you get to then appreciate how that track was built because you’re just listening to the elements of the music behind it.”

Gloria Gaynor and the Glee Cast are among the artists to cover this song. Weezer included it on their 2019 covers collection known as The Teal Album.

In 2016, the musician Ted Yoder played this in his backyard on a hammered dulcimer. Streamed to Facebook Live, it got over 100 million views, earning Yoder the title, “Dulcimer Dad.”

Courtesy of Songfacts

The Lyrics

Welcome to your life
There's no turning back
Even while we sleep
We will find you

Acting on your best behaviour
Turn your back on mother nature
Everybody wants to rule the world

It's my own design
It's my own remorse
Help me to decide
Help me make the most

Of freedom and of pleasure
Nothing ever lasts forever
Everybody wants to rule the world

There's a room where the light won't find you
Holding hands while the walls come tumbling down
When they do I'll be right behind you

So glad we've almost made it
So sad they had to fade it
Everybody wants to rule the world

I can't stand this indecision
Married with a lack of vision
Everybody wants to rule the world
Say that you'll never, never, never, never need it
One headline why believe it?
Everybody wants to rule the world

All for freedom and for pleasure
Nothing ever lasts forever
Everybody wants to rule the world
Writer/s: Christopher Merrick Hughes, Ian Stanley, Roland Orzabal 
Publisher: BMG Rights Management, Songtrust Ave, Tratore, Universal Music Publishing Group, Warner Chappell Music, Inc.
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – I’m a Little Bit Country

Jim Adams, our host for Song Lyric Sunday, has given us Country Music this week. Being a big city girl I was never really into country music growing up. I was not familiar with it at all. However after living in Texas for a number of years, I opened my senses to it and was pleasantly surprised. In recent years country has a lot of crossover into other genres and has an immense appeal to most audiences. I am sharing a song by an artist I really like. Her style combines elements of Bluegrass, Appalachian, Folk and Country. I think this particular choice fits the bill for today. It is Gillian Welch singing ‘The Way It Goes’

The Song

I was unable to find any background for the writing of The Way It Goes but being a country song it tells its own story.

The song is from the album The Harrow & the Harvest. The fifth studio album by American singer-songwriter Gillian Welch. It was Welch’s first album in eight years and was released on June 28, 2011. The album was nominated for Best Folk Album for the 54th Grammy Awards.

The eight years since the release of 2003’s Soul Journey marked the longest period of time between album releases for Welch. In explaining the relatively long recording absence, Welch said, “The sad truth is we never liked anything enough to put it out, which is not a pleasant place to be.” She added, “over the course of that time that we were quiet we probably had enough songs to put out two or three records. Actually we made a few tentative steps at trying to record, but inevitably the heart would go out of it when we realized that we simply didn’t like the material enough to go on with it.” Welch frequently performed the song “The Way It Will Be” in years prior to the release of the album. Welch explains that this tense time period inspired the album title: “Our songcraft slipped and I really don’t know why. It’s not uncommon. It’s something that happens to writers. It’s the deepest frustration we have come through, hence the album title.”[3] The writing process involved “this endless back and forth between the two of us,” Welch said, stating that “It’s our most intertwined, co-authored, jointly-composed album.” John Dyer Baizley provided artwork for the album.

Courtesy of Wiki

The Lyrics

Becky Johnson bought the farm
Put a needle in her arm
That's the way that it goes
That's the way

And her brother laid her down
In the cold Kentucky ground
That's the way that it goes
That's the way

That's the way that it goes
Everybody's buying little baby clothes
That's the way that it ends
Though there was a time when she and I were friends

Well, Miranda ran away
Took her cat and left LA
That's the way that it goes
That's the way

She was busted, broke and flat
Had to sell that pussy cat
That's the way that it goes
That's the way

That's the way that it goes
Everybody's buying little baby clothes
That's the way that it ends
Though there was a time when he and I were friends

See the brightest ones of all
Early in October fall
That's the way that it goes
That's the way

While the dark ones go to bed
With good whiskey in their head
That's the way that it goes
That's the way

Now Billy Joe's back in the tank
You tell Russo, I'll tell Frank
That's the way that it goes
That's the way

Did he throw her down a well?
Did she leave him for that swell?
That's the way that it goes
That's the way

That's the way that it goes
Everybody's buying little baby clothes
That's the way that it ends
Though there was a time when all of us were friends

When you lay me down to rest
Leave a pistol in my vest
That's the way that it goes
That's the way

Do you miss my gentle touch?
Did I hurt you very much?
That's the way that it goes
That's the way

That's the way that it goes
Everybody's buying little baby clothes
That's the way that it ends
Though there was a time when you and I were friends

The Way It Goes Lyrics as written by Gillian Welch David Rawlings
Lyrics © Wixen Music Publishing
Lyrics powered by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – Mersey Sound

A blast from the past is the prompt from Jim Adams, the host of Song Lyric Sunday. He has asked us to find a song from the Mersey Beat era of the 60s. There are so many that came out of Liverpool at that time, including the Beatles, but for me one that song that describes the feeling of the time is ‘Ferry Cross The Mersey” by Gerry and the Pacemakers. Gerry Marsden wrote the song.

The first video below was remastered in stereo and the second is the original song. Hope you enjoy them.

Wishing you all a Happy Holiday Season!

The Song

The Mersey Ferry runs along the Mersey river from Liverpool to the Wirral Peninsula in England. It still runs, but these days is mostly a tourist attraction. Written by lead singer Gerry Marsden, the song is a nostalgic look at the area where he is from.

The music played by bands from the Liverpool area around this time became known as the “Mersey Sound.” This song came to symbolize the style, which was made famous by The Beatles and The Kinks.
In 1965, Gerry & the Pacemakers starred in a film called Ferry Cross The Mersey, which was based on this song. The song and the film took off together. The song reached the top ten in the UK in 1964 and in the USA in 1965. Many years later, the life of frontman Gerry Marsden was re-created in a stage musical, also called Ferry Cross the Mersey. The musical opened in Liverpool and was staged elsewhere, including Australia and the USA.

“Ferry Cross The Mersey” was remade in May 1989 as a charity version to help those affected by the Hillsborough disaster, which claimed the lives of 96 Liverpool football fans. Featuring Gerry Marsden and other Liverpool stars such as Paul McCartney, The Christians, and Frankie Goes To Hollywood’s Holly Johnson, it reached #1 in the UK and raised millions of pounds.

Fun Facts

The Mersey is a famous river in Liverpool, England, a city in which the Beatles began their musical career. But this song was begun by another group of Merseyside musicians called Gerry and the Pacemakers. “Ferry Cross the Mersey” was produced by George [now Sir George] Martin, who was responsible for almost all of the records recorded by The Beatles.

You can still catch the Mersey ferry and cross the river Mersey today. It sails from Birkenhead into Liverpool. And as sometimes happens with song lyrics, there is a dispute as to whether the word is “cross” or “across.” Some people write “Ferry, ‘Cross the Mersey,” meaning “across” the river, but the correct version is “cross.” It’s a command or request to the ferry captain meaning, “Please cross the Mersey.”

The Lyrics

Life goes on day after day
Hearts torn in every way

So ferry 'cross the Mersey
'Cause this land's the place I love
And here I'll stay

People, they rush everywhere
Each with their own secret care
So ferry 'cross the Mersey
And always take me there
The place I love

People around every corner
Seem to smile and say
We don't care what your name is, boy
We'll never turn you away

So I'll continue to say
Here I always will stay

So ferry 'cross the Mersey
'Cause this land's the place I love
And here I'll stay
And here I'll stay
Here I'll stay

Writer/s: Gerrard Marsden 
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind


Courtesy of Songfacts

Song Lyric Sunday – Motown – Ooo Baby Baby

It’s Motown Week at Song Lyric Sunday! I have chosen an old favorite by Smokey Robinson and the Miracles, Ooo Baby Baby. It’s such a sexy break up/make up smoochy song. I love it.

Have a great Sunday.

The Song

The song is about cheating, with the singer apologizing for stepping out on his girl and letting her know that he’s all torn up about it. Robinson insists it isn’t autobiographical.

When Smokey Robinson appeared on American Idol in 2009, he said that this song came about by accident. The Miracles used to sing a medley of love songs on stage, and at the end of the medley (a song called “Please Say You Want Me” by the Schoolboys) he broke off into singing “ooh, baby baby.” The Miracles were so in tune that the other members started harmonizing with him, and the crowd went crazy. They incorporated this bit into their live act, then used it as the basis for the song when they decided to record it.

Smokey Robinson wrote this with fellow Miracle Pete “Warren” Moore. It is now considered the Miracles’ signature song.

According to the Rolling Stone Top 500 Songs, “Robinson called this ballad his ‘National anthem,’ noting, ‘Wherever we go, it’s the one song that everybody asks for.'”

This is one of the most confusingly credited songs of all time; the title sometimes appears as “Ooo Baby Baby” instead of “Ooh Baby Baby,” and the group alternately listed as The Miracles or Smokey Robinson & the Miracles. We’ve even seen a demo 45 where the song is listed as “Oo Baby Baby.”

On most compilation albums, the song is listed as “Ooo Baby Baby.”

It is officially published as “Ooh Baby Baby,” with the alternate titles covering all the permutations:

“Baby Baby”
“Oh Baby Baby”
“Ooo Baby Baby”
“Oo Baby Baby”

Linda Ronstadt, who also covered the Miracles song “The Tracks Of My Tears,” released a version of this song that went to #7 US in 1979. The Five Stairsteps also charted with the song, taking it to #63 US in 1967. Other popular versions are by Shalamar, Sylvester and Ella Fitzgerald.
John Lennon, a huge fan of American soul music, copped the “I’m Crying” line in “I Am The Walrus” from the refrain in this song.

Lenny Kravitz covered the song for his 2014 Strut album. Kravitz told The Daily Telegraph that he rarely does covers, but an unexpected blast of this tune left him wanting to record it. “One morning early I was having my make up done for Hunger Games and the make-up artist was listening to a Motown station and it came on,” he said. “I hadn’t heard it for a long time (and) it sounded so beautiful.”

Courtesy of Songfacts

The Lyrics

Ooo la la la la
I did you wrong my heart went out to play
But in the game I lost you
What a price to pay, hey I'm crying

Ooo baby baby
Ooo baby baby

Mistakes I know I've made a few
But I'm only human
You've made mistakes too, I'm crying

Ooo baby baby
Ooo baby baby

I'm just about at the end of my rope
But I can't stop trying I can't give up hope
'Cause I feel that one day I'll hold you near
Whisper I still love you
Until that day is here I'm crying

Ooo baby baby
Ooo baby baby
Ooo baby baby
Ooo baby baby ooo

Writer/s: CLIFFORD N. BRANCH JR., PHYLLIS ROBINSON
Publisher: Universal Music Publishing Group
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – Reflections

Our friend Clive, from Take it Easy, has offered up this week’s Song Lyric Sunday prompt and it is “Songs with a recognizable intro”. I have chosen Reflections by the Supremes. The intro to this song is memorable, well at least to me. The album Reflections was released in 1967. The song was also used as the theme for a TV drama here in the States called China Beach about the Vietnam War. It ran from late 80s to early 90s and was the springboard for some now recognizable.actors.

The Song

“Reflections” was written by the Motown songwriting team of Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier and Eddie Holland. In a Songfacts interview with Dozier, he explained: “It’s about when the love has gone bad, or when things have changed in life. One thing in life that’s ever changing is tomorrow is always different from today. Things change for many reasons, and you have to be aware of why, and what is happening around you. You have to adapt to the changes in life. That’s what that was about: your reflection on how things used to be, can be and will be, hopefully.

It’s all about hope, too. The main theme of that song is hope: although things have come to pass, you have to start changing, remembering the old to get involved with a new approach in life.”
This song tells the story of a woman who looks back in anguish at her lost love, wondering what could have been had things worked out. But the song was directed in some ways at Motown head Barry Gordy, with the same sentiment.

Starting with “Where Did Our Love Go” in 1964, the Holland-Dozier-Holland team wrote nine #1 hits for The Supremes as well as many big songs for The Four Tops, Martha & the Vandellas, and several other acts on the label. After a few years of runaway success, the three writers demanded publishing rights to their songs, but were rebuffed by Gordy. This was when they wrote “Reflections,” which pleased Gordy by providing yet another hit for The Supremes, but portended the departure of Holland-Dozier-Holland, who left a short time later, breaking their contract in the process. The legal tussle between Gordy and his former star writers stretched on for many years.

Sonically, this was a departure for The Supremes, with no saxophone or prominent electric guitar backbeat. It retained the sturdy bassline of James Jamerson, but featured a Wurlitzer electric piano by Earl Van Dyke and tambourine by Jack Ashford. Pistol Allen was the drummer and Joe Messina added guitar. The oscillator-generated sound effects also appear throughout the track.

This was the first foray for The Supremes into psychedelic pop, a sound fully realized by The Beatles a month earlier when they released their Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album.

“Reflections” has some mind-bending lyrics:

Trapped in a world
that’s a distorted reality

It also opens with some trippy sound effects that were created with a custom oscillator designed by one of The Funk Brothers, who were session musicians for most Motown songs of the period.

This was released during The Summer of Love (1967) when the Vietnam War was raging. This made it an appropriate choice for the theme song of the TV series China Beach, which was set in Vietnam during the war. The series ran on ABC from 1988-1991

The Lyrics

Through the mirror of my mind
Time after time
I see reflections of you and me

Reflections of
The way life used to be
Reflections of
The love you took from me

Oh, I'm all alone now
No love to shield me
Trapped in a world
That's a distorted reality

Happiness you took from me
And left me all alone
With only memories

Through the mirror of my mind
Through all these tears that I'm crying
Reflects a hurt I can't control
Although you're gone
I keep holding on
To those happy times
Oh, girl when you were mine

As I peer through the windows
Of lost time
Keeping looking over my yesterdays
And all the love I gave all in vain
(All the love) All the love
That I've wasted
(All the tears) All the tears
That I've tasted
All in vain

Through the hollow of my tears
I see a dream that's lost
From the hurt baby
That you have caused

Everywhere I turn
Seems like everything I see
Reflects a hurt I can't control

In you I put
All my hope and trust
Right before my eyes
My whole world has turned to dust

Reflections of
The love you took from
Reflections of
The way life used to be

In you I put
All my hope and trust
Right before my eyes
My whole world has turned to dust

Now baby, why did you do it?
Reflections

Writer/s: DAVID BRYAN BENOIT 
Publisher: Universal Music Publishing Group
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind


Courtesy of Songfacts

Song Lyric Sunday – Van Morrison – Cover of Rolling Stone

Artists who have appeared on the cover of Rolling Stone Magazine is our prompt for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday. What a fantastic subject suggested by our host Jim Adams! It was fun just scrolling through the list going back to the 1960s. My choice is probably my most favorite artist of all time, Van Morrison. He appeared on issue #62 July 9, 1970. The song I picked is ‘Someone Like You’, a favorite of mine. It was written and recorded much later than the magazine issue.

The Song

“Someone Like You” is a song written by Northern Irish singer and songwriter Van Morrison and recorded on his seventeenth studio album, Poetic Champions Compose (1987). It has become a wedding and movie classic and the song subsequently furnished the framework for one of Morrison’s most popular classics and love ballads, “Have I Told You Lately”, released in 1989.

In 1987, the single charted at number 28 on the Billboard Adult Contemporary in the U.S.In 2019, it peaked at #1 on the Ireland radio airplay chart.

“Someone Like You” was recorded in the summer of 1987 at Wool Hall Studios in Beckington, Somerset with Mick Glossop as engineer.

This song was released again on two of Morrison’s compilation albums in 2007. A remastered version has been included in the album, Still on Top – The Greatest Hits and it is one of the songs on Van Morrison’s 2007 compilation album, Van Morrison at the Movies – Soundtrack Hits.

The song was featured in the following movies:

Only the Lonely (1991)
Prelude to a Kiss (1992)
French Kiss (1995)
One Fine Day (1996)
Someone Like You (2001)
Bridget Jones’s Diary (2001)
American Sniper (2014)

Charlie’s Angel Farrah Fawcett was a huge fan of Van Morrison. When the actress was dying of cancer and too sick to attend one of his concerts, the Irish singer taped it especially for her. It was one of the last things she ever watched.

Courtesy of Wiki and Songfacts

The Song Lyrics

I've been searching a long time
Someone exactly like you
I've been traveling all around the world
Waiting for you to come through

Someone like you makes it all worth while
Someone like you keeps me satisfied
Someone exactly like you

I've been travelin' a hard road
Baby, lookin' for someone exactly like you
I've been carryin' my heavy load
Waiting for the light to come shining through

Someone like you makes it all worth while
Someone like you keeps me satisfied
Someone exactly like you

I've been doin' some soul searching
To find out where you're at
I've been up and down the highway
In all kinds of foreign lands

Someone like you makes it all worth while
Someone like you keeps me satisfied
Someone exactly like you

I've been all around the world
Marching to the beat of a different drum
But just lately I have realized
Maybe the best is yet to come

Someone like you makes it all worth while
Someone like you keeps me satisfied
Someone exactly like you
Someone exactly like you
Someone exactly like you

Writer/s: Van Morrison
Publisher: BMG Rights Management
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – Famous Parents

Our friend Paula from Light Motifs II has suggested the prompt for today’s Song Lyric Sunday. It is “Singers with Famous Musician Parents”. My immediate go to is Norah Jones who came onto the scene in 2002 with her smash album ‘Come Away With Me’. Her style and beautiful voice drew in a huge fan base curious about her music and background. It turned out she was the daughter of the famous sitar player Ravi Shanker. Yes, remember him? He taught Beatles’ guitarist George Harrison how to play the sitar!

The Song

This love song is the title track to Norah Jones’ debut album, released in 2002 when she was just 22. A patient, peaceful song, it finds Jones singing about a romantic escape where the only thing that matters is that they’re together. At the time, Jones was dating her bass player, Lee Alexander.

“Come Away With Me” is one of three songs Jones wrote on the album, which was produced by the legendary Arif Mardin (Diana Ross, Aretha Franklin, Chaka Khan) and released on the jazz label Blue Note Records. Jones had final say on the tracklist and left off a number of songs she wrote herself, going with songs written by her collaborators instead. Her guitarist, Jesse Harris, has five songs on the album, including the lead single, “Don’t Know Why.”

The Come Away With Me album is a rare massive seller with no big hits. The only song to land in the Hot 100 was “Don’t Know Why,” which made #30. “Come Away with Me” was the third single, released in December 2002 after the album had been out for nine months. By this time, it has already sold millions of copies, but many were just discovering it. In February 2003, it took Album of the Year at the Grammy Awards, one of five wins for Jones that night. The album ended up selling 10 million in America to go Diamond, a certification more familiar to acts like the Bee Gees and Backstreet Boys.

The music video was directed by James Frost, whose work includes Radiohead’s “House of Cards” and Coldplay’s “Yellow.” It shows Jones driving what appears to be the 1971 Cadillac DeVille that played a very important role in her life (we’re not sure if it’s the real one or a replica, but it has Texas plates). Jones’ mother bought her the oversized vehicle when they were living in Texas and Norah needed to commute for work. The car was pretty much indestructible, so it was a safe choice.When Jones was a student at the University of North Texas, she let a friend borrow the car to transport a band that was in town from New York City. This band and their crew ended up hanging out with Jones, and one of them, Jesse Harris, stayed in touch. When Jones moved to New York to pursue music, she started collaborating with Harris and one of the other guys from that trip to Texas bought the car. For Jones, the vehicle is a symbol of her Texas roots and of her life journey.


Courtesy of Songfacts

Song Lyric Sunday – Kiss From A Rose

This week our host for Song Lyric Sunday, Jim Adams, has given us the prompts, Hug, Kiss and Embrace. I have chosen Kiss From A Rose, by Seal. This was an easy pick for me as I just happened to hear it again today. I have always liked it as it reminds me of a visit back home to the UK in the nineties. It was such a great trip and this song was being played everywhere. On checking I did notice that I had featured this song more than three years ago for another SLS prompt. I think enough time has passed and that it really doesn’t matter if I choose it again, right?

Have a great Sunday.

.

The Song

One of the more mysterious songs ever written, there has been much speculation as to the meaning of “Kiss From A Rose” – many think it has something to do with drugs, while others hear it as an expression of love or a journey to the afterlife. Seal has never explained what the song is about, offering only that there was “some kind of relationship that inspired the lyrics.” Seal bucked convention by not including printed lyrics with the album, something he did because he didn’t want to wash away anyone’s interpretation. He also says that his songs often mean more than one thing, so attributing a meaning would be too simplistic. In lieu of lyrics, Seal wrote a screed on the subject that went with the album. “I think it’s the general vibe of what I’m saying that is important and not the exact literal translation,” he wrote. “The song is always larger in the listener’s mind because with it they attach imagery which is relative to their own personal experience. So it is your perception of what I’m saying rather than what I actually way that is the key.”

Seal wrote this song sometime around 1988 when he was living in a squat in Kensal Green, London. He says it was a liberating time, as it was before he had a record deal and there was no pressure on him. He didn’t know how to play any instruments, so he sang the instrumental parts onto a 4-track tape recorder as an experiment. He tossed the tape aside and thought nothing of it; when he recorded his 1991 debut album, he didn’t even consider it. The song was revived two years later when Seal played if for his best friend, who told Seal’s producer, Trevor Horn, about it. Horn made Seal play it for him, and he liked what he heard. They recorded the song for his second album (Seal, 1994), but they still nearly tanked it. “I thought it was too flowery and that it didn’t fit,” Seal told The Guardian. They were going to pull it from the tracklist, but reconsidered after their friend Lynne Franks heard the album-in-progress and said she liked “that song that was something about a rose.”

The song was released as a single in the UK, where it went to #20 in July 1994. In America, the song didn’t get noticed until it played under the end credits of the movie Batman Forever and was included on the soundtrack. The film was released in May 1995, nearly a year after Seal’s album was issued. The movie appearance sparked demand for the song in the US; it was issued as a single there in June 1995 and climbed to #1 in August.Batman Forever was distributed by Warner Bros., the same conglomerate that owned Seal’s US label, Sire Records. The song was submitted for a love scene featuring Nicole Kidman’s Dr. Chase Meridian character and Val Kilmer’s Batman, but the film’s director, Joel Schumacher, decided it was a better fit under the end credits.

Do you hear the lyric as “kiss from a rose on a grave?” If so, you’re not the only one, but it’s really “kiss from a rose on a gray.” David Sancious, who played keyboards on Seal’s 1998 album Human Being and joined him on the subsequent tour, found out from the source.  “We were having lunch somewhere one day and he explained it to me,” Sancious told Songfacts. “It was a poetic thing, just a little taste of poetry that happened to sound like something else.”

With its curious waltz time, lavish harmonies and epic sound proportions, “Kiss From A Rose” has a very different sound and stood out on the radio, where many stations were willing to play it. In the US, it was a #1 hit on the Adult Contemporary charts for 12 weeks.

This won Grammy Awards in 1996 for Record of the Year, Song of the Year and Best Pop Vocal Performance. It wasn’t eligible for an Oscar because the song appeared on Seal’s album before it was used in the film.

Courtesy of Songfacts

The Lyrics

Ba-ya-ya, ba-da, ba-da-da-da, ba-ya-ya
Ba-ya-ya, ba-da, ba-da-da-da, ba-ya-ya
Ba-ya-ya, ba-da, ba-da-da-da, ba-ya-ya
Ba-ya-ya, ba-da, ba-da-da-da, ba-ya-ya

There used to be a greying tower alone on the sea
You became the light on the dark side of me
Love remained a drug that's the high and not the pill

But did you know that when it snows
My eyes become large and
The light that you shine can't be seen?

Baby, I compare you to a kiss from a rose on the grey
Ooh, the more I get of you, the stranger it feels, yeah
And now that your rose is in bloom
A light hits the gloom on the grey

Ba-ya-ya, ba-da, ba-da-da-da, ba-ya-ya
Ba-ya-ya, ba-da, ba-da-da-da, ba-ya-ya

There is so much a man can tell you, so much he can say
You remain my power, my pleasure, my pain
Baby, to me, you're like a growing addiction that I can't deny
Won't you tell me, is that healthy, baby?

But did you know that when it snows
My eyes become large and
The light that you shine can't be seen?

Baby, I compare you to a kiss from a rose on the grey
Ooh, the more I get of you, the stranger it feels, yeah (yeah)
Now that your rose is in bloom
A light hits the gloom on the grey

I've been kissed by a rose on the grey
I've been kissed by a rose on the grey
And if I should fall, will it all go away? (I've been kissed by a rose on the grey)
I've been kissed by a rose on the grey

There is so much a man can tell you, so much he can say
You remain my power, my pleasure, my pain
To me, you're like a growing addiction that I can't deny (yeah)
No won't you tell me, is that healthy, baby?

But did you know that when it snows
My eyes become large and
The light that you shine can't be seen?

Baby, I compare you to a kiss from a rose on the grey
Ooh, the more I get of you, the stranger it feels, yeah
Now that your rose is in bloom
A light hits the gloom on the grey

Yes, I compare you to a kiss from a rose on the grey
Ooh, the more I get of you, the stranger it feels, yeah (yeah)
And now that your rose is in bloom
A light hits the gloom on the grey

Ba-ya-ya, ba-da, ba-da-da-da, ba-ya-ya

Now that your rose is in bloom
A light hits the gloom on the grey

Writer/s: Henry Olusegun Adeola Samuel 
Publisher: Universal Music Publishing Group
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Song Lyric Sunday – If You Could Read My Mind

This week Jim Adams has prompted us with “Songs that remind us if ourselves” for Song Lyric Sunday. As I write poetry about feelings and healing, I have always been drawn to this song. The lyrics are wonderful and poetic telling the story of Gordon Lightfoot’s breakdown of his marriage.

The Song

“If You Could Read My Mind” is a song by Canadian singer-songwriter Gordon Lightfoot. It reached number one on Canadian music charts and was his first recording to appear on the American music charts, reaching number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart in February 1971. Later in the year it reached number 30 in the UK. The song also reached number one for one week on the Billboard Easy Listening chart, and was the first of four Lightfoot releases to reach number one.

This song first appeared on Lightfoot’s 1970 album Sit Down Young Stranger, which was later renamed If You Could Read My Mind following the song’s success.

Lightfoot has cited his divorce for inspiring the lyrics, saying they came to him as he was sitting in a vacant Toronto house one summer. At the request of his daughter, Ingrid, he performs the lyrics with a slight change now: the line “I’m just trying to understand the feelings that you lack” is altered to “I’m just trying to understand the feelings that we lack.” He has said in an interview that the difficulty with writing songs inspired by personal stories is that there is not always the emotional distance and clarity to make lyrical improvements such as the one his daughter suggested. 

In 1987 Lightfoot filed a lawsuit against the writer of “The Greatest Love of All”, alleging plagiarism of 24 bars of “If You Could Read My Mind”. Lightfoot has stated that he dropped the lawsuit when he felt it was having a negative effect on the singer Whitney Houston, as the lawsuit was about the writer and not her. 

The song is in A major and uses the subtonic chord.

The Lyrics


If you could read my mind love
What a tale my thoughts could tell
Just like an old time movie
About a ghost from a wishing well
In a castle dark or a fortress strong
With chains upon my feet
You know that ghost is me
And I will never be set free
As long as I’m a ghost you can see
 
If I could read your mind love
What a tale your thoughts could tell
Just like a paperback novel
The kind the drugstore sells
When you reach the part where
the heartaches come
Come the hero would be me
Heroes often fail
And you won’t read that book again
Because the ending’s just to hard to take
 
I walk away like a movie star
Who gets burned in a three way script
Enter number two, a movie queen
To play the scene of bringing all the
good things out in me
But for now love let’s be real
 
I never knew I feel this way
And I’ve got to say that I just don’t get it
I don’t know where we went wrong
But the feeling’s gone and I just can’t get it back
 
If you could read my mind love
What a tale my thoughts could tell
Just like an old time movie about a
ghost from a wishing well
In a castle dark or a fortress strong
With chains upon my feet
The story always ends
And if you read between the lines
You’ll know that I’m just trying to understand
The feeling that you left
 
I never knew I feel this way
And I’ve got to say that I just don’t get it
I don’t know where we went wrong
But the feeling’s gone
And I just can’t get it back
Source: LyricFind

Songwriters: Gordon Lightfoot
If You Could Read My Mind lyrics
© Warner Chappell Music, Inc
 


Song Lyric Sunday – When Bands Break Up

There is an interesting prompt for today’s Song Lyric Sunday from our host Jim Adams. He has asked us to find a song from a band that broke up and we wished they were still together. I have had to go to the first band that I loved as a pre-teen, The Beatles. When they broke up, well, it was the end of the world. At the time we were all in love with the look, the sweet music and of course easily swept up with the hysteria known as Beatlemania. I couldn’t understand why the Beatles would want to break up and I hated Yoko Ono for ruining everything. Of course I now know that they wanted to pursue their experimental music instead of playing for audiences who never heard them anyway because of the screaming.

Lennon and McCartney were amazing songwriters but It wasn’t until much later, after I had watched the Beatles Anthology and other documentaries, that I realized how much George Martin, their record producer, influenced their music and recordings. He was affectionately known as the “Fifth Beatle”

So my choice of song today is Eleanor Rigby which features an amazing string section, one of George Martin’s ingenious contributions. Hope you enjoy it.

The Song

Paul McCartney wrote most of this song. He got the name “Eleanor” from the actress Eleanor Bron, who appeared in the 1965 Beatles film Help!. “Rigby” came to him when he was in Bristol, England, and spotted a store: Rigby and Evens Ltd Wine and Spirit Shippers. He liked the name “Eleanor Rigby” because it sounded natural and matched the rhythm he wrote.
McCartney explained at the time that his songs came mostly from his imagination. Regarding this song, he said, “It just came. When I started doing the melody I developed the lyric. It all came from the first line. I wonder if there are girls called Eleanor Rigby?”

McCartney wasn’t sure what the song was going to be about until he came up with the line “picks up the rice in a church where a wedding has been.” That’s when he came up with the story of an old, lonely woman. The lyrics “wearing the face that she keeps in a jar by the door” are a reference to the cold-cream she wears in an effort to look younger.

The song tells the story of two lonely people. First, we meet a churchgoing woman named Eleanor Rigby, who is seen cleaning up rice after a wedding. The second verse introduces the pastor, Father McKenzie, whose sermons “no one will hear.” This could indicate that nobody in coming to his church, or that his sermons aren’t getting through to the congregation on a spiritual level. In the third verse, Eleanor dies in the church and Father McKenzie buries her.
“Father Mackenzie” was originally “Father McCartney.” Paul decided he didn’t want to freak out his dad and picked a name out of the phone book instead.

After Eleanor Rigby is buried, we learn that “no one was saved,” indicating that her soul did not elevate to heaven as promised by the church. This could be seen as a swipe at Christianity and the concept of being saved by Jesus. The song was released in August 1966 just weeks after the furor over John Lennon’s remarks, “Christianity will go. It will vanish and shrink. I needn’t argue about that; I’m right and I will be proved right. We’re more popular than Jesus now.”

For the most part, the song eluded controversy, possibly because the lilting string section made it easier to handle.

A string section scored by Beatles producer George Martin consisting of four violins, two violas and two cellos were used in recording. Paul may have been inspired by the classic composer Vivaldi.
The Beatles didn’t play any of the instruments on this track. All the music came from the string players, who were hired as session musicians.

Paul McCartney recounted this song’s origin story in a 2018 interview with GQ. He said: “When I was really little I lived on what was called a housing estate, which is like the projects – there were a lot of old ladies and I enjoyed sitting around with these older ladies because they had these great stories, in this case about World War II. One in particular I used to visit and I’d go shopping for her – you know, she couldn’t get out. So I had that figure in my mind of a sort of lonely old lady.

Over the years, I’ve met a couple of others, and maybe their loneliness made me empathize with them. But I thought it was a great character, so I started this song about the lonely old lady who picks up the rice in the church, who never really gets the dreams in her life. Then I added in the priest, the vicar, Father McKenzie. And so, there was just the two characters. It was like writing a short story, and it was basically on these old ladies that I had known as a kid.”

In Observer Music Monthly, November 2008, McCartney said: “These lonely old ladies were something I knew about growing up, and that was what ‘Eleanor Rigby’ was about – the fact that she died and nobody really noticed. I knew this went on.”

There is a gravestone for an Eleanor Rigby in St. Peter’s Churchyard in Woolton, England. Woolton is a suburb of Liverpool and Lennon first met McCartney at a fete at St. Peter’s Church. The gravestone bearing the name Eleanor Rigby shows that she died in October 1939, aged 44. However Eleanor was not like the lonely people in McCartney’s song, as she was married. Another of the gravestones there has the word “McKenzie” written on it. McCartney has denied that that is the source of the names, though he has agreed that they may have registered subconsciously.

The Lyrics

Ah, look at all the lonely people
Ah, look at all the lonely people

Eleanor Rigby
Picks up the rice in the church where a wedding has been
Lives in a dream
Waits at the window
Wearing the face that she keeps in a jar by the door
Who is it for?

All the lonely people
Where do they all come from?
All the lonely people
Where do they all belong?

Father McKenzie
Writing the words of a sermon that no one will hear
No one comes near
Look at him working
Darning his socks in the night when there's nobody there
What does he care?

All the lonely people
Where do they all come from?
All the lonely people
Where do they all belong?

Ah, look at all the lonely people
Ah, look at all the lonely people

Eleanor Rigby
Died in the church and was buried along with her name
Nobody came
Father McKenzie
Wiping the dirt from his hands as he walks from the grave
No one was saved

All the lonely people (ah, look at all the lonely people)
Where do they all come from?
All the lonely people (ah, look at all the lonely people)
Where do they all belong?

Writer/s: John Lennon, Paul McCartney
Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind
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